Local hoteliers rest easier as occupancy up

first_img Previous articleMurray gets nod at nine for openerNext article‘New moral low’ as graveside visitor robbed admin Facebook Print Linkedin Twitter WhatsAppcenter_img HARD work and ingenuity is paying off for Limerick’s hoteliers, who have driven business up after getting in bed with tourism attractions and restaurateurs to cut deals.According to the Mid-West Hotel Federation branch of the Hotel Federation of Ireland, Limerick is now “the most competitively priced tourist city in terms of hotel prices in the country”.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Chairman of the Mid-West branch, Clare hotelier Michael Vaughan, said that the work being done by the city’s hotels is to be applauded. “They have got together with the tourism attractions, such as Thomond Park and the restaurants and done deals for packages. They have sought funding for marketing and brochures and it’s paying off. The latest report is that there is an increase of three per cent in occupancy year on year,” Michael told The Limerick Post.He was speaking in the wake of the publication of the release of the latest hotel figures from STL Global for Dublin, which show that rates being charged in the capital are up by 5.4 per cent. “There is a two-pronged recovery. One is the kind of recovery seen in Dublin and aside from the fact that it is a capital city, there have also been massive investments in attractions like the Aviva stadium and the Grand Canal Theatre. Limerick is recovering in terms of occupancy”.There is also increased activity in terms of coach tour business in the city, the hotels representative said. “Limerick is probably now the most competitively priced tourist city in Ireland”. The improvement is welcomed in the entire region, Michael said, as Limerick “has underperformed for the last 10 years. The Mid-West branch (of the IHF) had identified Limerick city tourism as the single biggest tourism difficulty in the region. If Limerick improves its tourism draw, then that brings people into the region”. Email NewsLocal NewsLocal hoteliers rest easier as occupancy upBy admin – September 13, 2011 466 Advertisementlast_img read more

USNS Spearhead Starts Cameroonian Phase of APS

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today USNS Spearhead Starts Cameroonian Phase of APS View post tag: africa The USNS Spearhead and its embarked detachment of U.S. Navy Sailors, civil service mariners and U.S., Spanish and British Marines began the Cameroonian phase of Africa Partnership Station (APS) March 11, 2015 in Douala, Cameroon.Spearhead will function as a training platform for Cameroonian marines to practice maritime interdiction boardings in preparation for Obangame Express 2015, an upcoming multinational maritime security exercise, focusing on interoperability.While in port, Spearhead will host a shipboard visit attended by U.S. ambassador to Cameroon Michael S. Hoza and Vice Commander, U.S. 6th Fleet Rear Admiral Thomas Reck.[mappress mapid=”15369″]Image: US Navy View post tag: USNS Spearhead View post tag: phase USNS Spearhead Starts Cameroonian Phase of APS View post tag: News by topic Authorities View post tag: APS View post tag: Naval View post tag: Navy View post tag: Cameroonian View post tag: starts Share this article March 12, 2015last_img read more

Senate shoots down reallocation of funds resolution

first_imgAfter last week’s closed meeting, in which the Notre Dame senate heard and declined to overturn an appeal regarding the sanction of the Dugan-Pozas Garza ticket, it reconvened for its regular programming last night. The agenda included further debate over the allocation of funding between Student Union organizations and the Club Coordination Council (CCC). First, the senate heard a presentation from senior director of Campus Dining Chris Abayasinghe, who spoke over the changes to come to meal plans for the undergraduate student body next fall. “We began this journey roughly four years ago,” Abayasinghe said. “What we heard were some common themes, and I think this also coincides with the announcement in 2017 about enhancing the on-campus residential communities including free laundry and the meal plans.”Abayasinghe said the decision to offer more meal plan options with flex points rollover and block meal plans came from the realization of two things: the value students see in flex points and how many meal swipes students have left over at the end of each week. After Abayasinghe’s presentation, the senate returned to debate over Resolution SO1290-27, which called for clubs to receive more funding. If passed, the resolution would allocate 46% of funds available from the Financial Management Board (FMB) to the CCC and 53% of funds to the remaining Student Union organizations. Currently, the CCC receives 40% of available funds and 59% goes to Student Union organizations. The 6% change was the cause of much tension in the questioning and debate period two weeks ago during the Feb. 5 senate meeting, in which the debate period was postponed. Wednesday’s meeting proved much the same. Approximately a year ago, the student senate debated a similar resolution and ultimately rejected it.Senior and CCC president Jordan Isner started the debate by encouraging those in attendance to try to remain ”unbiased.” He then presented a number of statistics in favor of the resolution, citing the surplus of unspent funds spent by the Student Union over the last three years. Not accounting for deficits, the Student Union ran a surplus of $51,323 for the 2018-2019 year.“I didn’t subtract out the deficits because Student Union boards shouldn’t be running deficits,” Isner said.Student body vice president Patrick McGuire added that the Student Union board had a roughly $30,000 deficit last year, which would be subtracted from the $51,323 Isner presented. Christine Arcoleo, Student Union treasurer and senior, who helped draft and sign off on the resolution, explained what happens to funds that are not spent each year.“[The surplus] can be rolled back into the endowment and it can earn interest to be used in the following year,” Arcoleo said. ”So basically it’s OK to have some leftover money to go back into the endowment, but it is a problem if there’s a huge surplus not going to any clubs or organizations.” Isner also cited direct quotes from club leaders who told him their clubs need more funding.Junior Class Council president Sam Cannova then took to the floor to argue against the resolution. Cannova explained the $26,508.25 surplus from the Student Union is due to how the Hall President’s Council (HPC) uses its funds.“For the last three years, HPC has run a $35 — $36 — $37,000 surplus, but for the two [years] prior, they were totally flat,” Cannova said. ”[I] talked to the HPC chairs who said it’s because of a problem in how they actually get funds to the halls to do their events. Basically, the hall throws the event, then they request the funds, without knowing if they’ll get the funds in the first place.” Cannova then cited information that only 25% of, or 106 clubs, receive CCC funding, and the other 75% of clubs are self-sufficient.“About 44% [of funds] go to athletic clubs and less than 9% go to cultural and service clubs,” he said. ”Basically what we are seeing is there is a need. It’s comparable to the Student Union, but it is not as dire.” Fisher senator and junior DC Morris also opposed the resolution.“Fisher guys are proud of the Regatta. Keenan guys are proud of the Revue,” Morris said. ”I don’t know if your dorm doesn’t have pride like that, but we are [about] to take money from things that help fund those and [give it] to clubs who quite frankly in my opinion, like men’s volleyball club, may impact 25 individuals on campus. … The dorms are the heart of the community at Notre Dame, and I just want to protect the dorms.” Diversity Council chair and senior Tiffany Rojas offered a different perspective.“Halls aren’t a source of community for all Notre Dame students,” Rojas said. “Most students find their communities in these 400 clubs. I think the thing with club sports is a bit unfair, because a lot of times this is where students can find their outlet outside of the academic sphere.” After a half hour of debate, the resolution was voted on and fell shy of the majority. With 14 votes for the resolution, 19 votes against it and one abstaining vote, the motion failed to pass. “Are clubs underfunded? The answer should be a resounding ‘Yes.’ Does student government effectively represent students? Tonight, senate proved the answer to this question is a resounding ’No,’” Isner said in an email. “I am disappointed that clubs will continue to struggle for funding, while Student Union branches waste tens of thousands of dollars every year.’’Cannova also commented on the passing of the resolution.“I’m glad that the senate could take the time to share a fact-based discussion on an important topic,” he said. “After last year’s decision to shift 3% of all Student Union funds into clubs, and with thorough review of Student Union budgets and broad figures on the CCC-funded clubs, it seems that we are already at a good balance. It’s important to remember that we’re all working towards the same end here: improving the student experience. With that in mind, I’m looking forward to finding more creative ways to collaborate with different clubs and other Student Union organizations through the rest of the year.”Tags: Club Coordination Council, club funding, Senate, Student Unionlast_img read more

PA Task Force One Returns to Philadelphia after Federal Deployment for Harvey and Irma Response

first_img September 20, 2017 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Hurricane Harvey,  National Issues,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf announced that members of PA Task Force One, Urban Search and Rescue Task Force returned to their home station in Philadelphia after several weeks on federal deployment to assist first responders after Hurricane Harvey hit Texas and Hurricane Irma hit Florida.Five members remain deployed as part of a federal Incident Support Team currently stationed in San Juan, Puerto Rico to provide support to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands in anticipation of significant impacts from Hurricane Maria. Their mission is to coordinate operations of federal resources currently on the ground there.“The men and women of Task Force One make tremendous sacrifices in time away from their loved ones in both training and actual deployments,” said Governor Wolf. “We’re proud that we can help our fellow Americans during the incredibly difficult response and recovery process.”The team has the capability to conduct water rescues and consists of highly trained personnel in search and rescue such as heavy rigging and structural specialists, hazardous materials, specialized communications, medical personnel and canine handlers, as well as staff who will aid the team with ground support once they arrive on site.It is not known how long deployed members will remain in Puerto Rico. PA TF1 US&R is just one of numerous task forces from multiple states to receive federal activation orders.center_img PA Task Force One Returns to Philadelphia after Federal Deployment for Harvey and Irma Responselast_img read more