Dodgers to renovate stadium ahead of 2020 season, All-Star Game

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmaildszc/iStock(LOS ANGELES) — The Los Angeles Dodgers on Tuesday announced plans to renovate their stadium in time for the 2020 season.The improvements to Dodger Stadium, MLB’s third-oldest ballpark, will cost $100 million and come as the team prepares to host the All-Star Game next season.“Dodger Stadium has always been and remains the most beautiful place ever built to play or watch the game of baseball, and these renovations will enhance every aspect of the fan experience with modern and family-friendly amenities,” Dodger President and CEO Stan Kasten said in a press release. “This latest project continues to demonstrate ownership’s commitment to give a first-class experience to the best fans in baseball.”Among the improvements are a new centerfield plaza, renovations to the left and right field pavilions, new elevators and bridges, a new sound system and a statue dedicated to Hall of Fame left-handed pitcher Sandy Koufax.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Written by July 24, 2019 /Sports News – National Dodgers to renovate stadium ahead of 2020 season, All-Star Gamecenter_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

Innovation Program Director – CCI

first_img Johns Hopkins University Level of Independent DecisionMaking:High level of independentdecision makingClassifiedTitle:Sr. Program ManagerWorking Title: Innovation Program Director -CCI ​​​​​Role/Level/Range: ATP/04/PG Starting Salary Range:Commensurate withExperienceEmployee group: Full Time Schedule: 5/37.5 Exempt Status: ExemptLocation: 01-MD:Homewood Campus Department name: 60006654-KSAS – Centers for Civic ImpactPersonnel area: School of Arts &SciencesThe successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject toa pre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply dependingon which campus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www.eeoc.gov/sites/default/files/migrated_files/employers/poster_screen_reader_optimized.pdf Reputation Marketing Manager Salary Not Specified Program Officer II Maryland, United States HomewoodCampus Facebook Twitter More searches like this GeneralSummary/Purpose:Johns Hopkins Universityseeks an Innovation Program Director for its soon-to-be-launchedcenter focused on public sector innovation, city transformation,and civic engagement. The new center will become a globallyrecognized organization focused on advancing the art and science ofpublic sector innovation, especially among local governments.Specifically, the center will advance research, engage students,and support local governments around organizational, program, andpolicy innovation.Working closely with the inaugural Executive Director and othersenior leadership, the Innovation Program Director will play acritical role in developing the center, designing and deliveringprograms, and building a team to increase the legitimacy and impactof local government innovation with a special emphasis on the waysin which residents contribute to the design, development, anddelivery of new services and policy approaches. The InnovationProgram Director will work in close collaboration with BloombergPhilanthropies, which has been a pioneer in supporting creativitywith city halls for the past decade and is providing the initialfunding for the new center.Under the direction of the Innovation Program Director, the Centerwill deliver technical assistance and training to city hall teams,to help them engage residents more effectively, design creativeinitiatives to tackle urban challenges, and apply approaches suchas human-centered design, crowdsourcing, and behavioral science todeliver better results for residents. The selected candidate musthave expertise in public sector innovation and experience leadingteams or organizations; an understanding of local government;exceptional leadership skills; comfort liaising with the highestlevels of city government; and a deep commitment to impact andmeasurement.The Innovation Program Director must have a forward-thinkingmindset and the vision to lead innovation strategy and deliverimpactful programs that benefit city residents, both expanding onthe legacy of existing initiatives and designing new ones. Ourideal candidate will demonstrate a strong point of view on theopportunity to reimagine the role and opportunities of localgovernments, what it means to create meaningful civic engagement,and the capacity for transformational resident-driveninnovation.The new center is committed to addressing structural and entrenchedracism and recognizes the public sector’s role in perpetuatingthese legacies over time and addressing them today. We are lookingfor a leader committed to dismantling structural and entrenchedracism and addressing these issues, both as they build a neworganization and advance this work in communities.This position reports tothe Executive Director.SpecificDuties/Responsibilities:In partnership with Centerleadership and funders, developing a strategy for innovationprogramming that helps build the field of public sector innovation,including establishing clear goals and measuring progress towardsthose goalsOverseeing the delivery ofmultiple innovation programs in cities around the world incoordination with staff, partner organizations, and philanthropicfundersEstablishing the Center asan international thought leader for governmentinnovationOverseeing the developmentof materials presenting innovation trends and results seen incitiesDeveloping and documentingbest practices in the field of government innovation, ensuringlocal governments can learn from one anotherBuilding a world-classteam to deliver innovation programming, and providing regularprofessional development on best practices and deliverymethodsOverseeing the work ofcenter staff and partner organizations delivering technicalassistance, ensuring engagements meet targeted goals and aredelivered on budgetBuilding and maintainingstrong relationships with city leaders, elected officials, andcritical stakeholdersRepresenting the center toexternal stakeholders including governments, philanthropy,nonprofit organizations, and academic and public sectorleadersOther duties asassigned Academic Affairs Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Salary Not Specified Business & Administrative Affairs Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Similar jobs LinkedIn You need to sign in or create an account to save You need to sign in or create an account to save Special knowledge, skills, andabilities:Experience with MicrosoftOffice, G Suite, and project management applicationsFamiliarity with learningmanagement systemsExperience using projectmanagement and collaboration software such as Asana andSlackDemonstrated effectivenessin coordinating with subject matter expertsUnderstanding ofqualitative and quantitative research methodsExcellent oral, written,communications, and research skillsCommitment to a collegialworkplaceCapacity to workindependently and in a results-oriented workplaceAbility to work onmultiple projects concurrentlycenter_img Salary Not Specified Johns Hopkins University Apply(This will open in a new window from which you will be automatically redirected to an external site after 5 seconds) Save Program Officer II Save Reputation Marketing Manager Enrollment Marketing Specialist Save Enrollment Marketing Specialist Maryland, United States Johns Hopkins University You need to sign in or create an account to save Maryland, United States Research Administration Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Minimum Qualifications(mandatory):Master’s degree in publicpolicy or related fieldAt least five years’experience in the field of government innovationExperience managingdiverse teamsAdditional education maysubstitute for experience, and additional experience may substituterequired education to the extent permitted by the JHU EquivalencyFormulaPreferredQualifications:City hall experience orother experience working with citiesGovernment transformationand program delivery experience, changing how government works toserve residents and delivering results-oriented programs, fromdesign to implementation to storytelling and impactmeasurementDiplomatic and customerservice orientation to liaise with the highest levels of governmentand successfully achieve common goals in cities—maximizing theimpact of programs, pushing for new innovation methodologies thatmay be unfamiliar, and collaboratively clearingroadblocksInterest in forgingrelationships between cities and growing a worldwide network ofgovernment innovation practitionersStrong communicationsskills to serve as a persuasive representative for programs withcities and partner organizations and at public forumsA record of strongprofessional achievements in public policy, public administration,or a related fieldProven ability to develop,manage, and thrive in relationships with public sector executivesand senior staffersSeasoned personnel skillsto manage a team of mid-level professionalsAbility to work in andlead teams in a result-driven workplaceExtensive familiarity withgovernment, nonprofit, and philanthropic stakeholdersUnderstanding of andability to communicate stories about the impact of innovation onthe public sector Share The successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject to apre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office at [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply depending on whichcampus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster.pdfImportant legal informationhttp://hrnt.jhu.edu/legal.cfm Administrative Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Other Business & Administrative Affairs Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimorelast_img read more

Campus Ministry hosts Las Posadas

first_imgThe Catholic liturgical season of Advent, which began Sunday, marks a time of preparation for the celebration of Christmas, and Campus Ministry is hosting a corresponding celebration of Las Posadas, a traditional procession that celebrates the journey of Mary and Joseph to Bethlehem before Christ was born. Las Posadas, which means “lodgings” in Spanish, will be celebrated Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at 9:30 p.m. at the Grotto. Participants will then continue to Fisher Hall, Farley Hall and the Coleman-Morse Center, all of which are co-sponsors for the celebration.Campus Ministry intern and senior Steven Fisher, who focuses on Latino ministry, said in an email that the event will be a condensed version of the traditional celebration. “If you were to grow up in Mexico, Central America or the Southwest United States, the celebration of Las Posadas would be a hallmark for nine days of your Advent season,” he said. “Each day you and your family would join a procession led by two individuals dressed as Mary and Joseph, and together, everyone reenacts their journey to the inn in Bethlehem. You’d arrive at certain designated homes in the neighborhood and in song ask for lodging until the homeowner finally recognizes Mary and Joseph. Once inside everyone joins together for prayer and good tamales, piñatas, punch and, if you’re my grandmother, a hidden bottle of tequila.”Fisher said the Notre Dame version will start with a short gathering at the Grotto before two students, in the role of Mary and Joseph, lead a musical procession to each building, where there will be a short prayer service and Gospel reading before refreshments are served. Coro Primavera, a Spanish choir, and MariachiND will lead the songs. “The song we sing goes back and forth between the procession and the hosts playing the role of the innkeepers,” Fisher said. “It’s one that illuminates my own childhood memories in Mexico of days leading to Christmas and allows my heart to swell with love for my own faith and heritage. To ask for lodging not only from the cold, but also from our own loneliness and longing to be loved and love others invites everyone to open their hearts. Together as a community, we serve as each other’s shelter.”Offering different Catholic traditions at Notre Dame is important because it exposes students to different “modes of expression that the Catholic faith offers for everyone’s spiritual growth,” Fisher said. “For Latino students and all who participate, Las Posadas presents an opportunity to forge culture and identity in creative alliance for an understanding of faith that collaborates with tradition, local experience and scripture, and as a result, reclaims the diversity of Catholicism as a source of vitality,” he said. Elaine DeBassige, rector of Farley Hall and the woman who brought Las Posadas to campus, said in an email that including cultural Catholic traditions is important because it embodies the Catholic faith. “Christ invites everyone to the table, and by including other cultural celebrations, it gives light to the many ways people from around the world come together to honor and praise God.” Tags: Advent, Campus Ministry, Las Posadaslast_img read more

Junior Parents Weekend allows students to introduce their family to the Notre Dame community

first_imgThis past weekend, parents of Notre Dame juniors flooded campus for Junior Parents Weekend (JPW), a deep-rooted tradition in the Notre Dame community that has taken place annually ever since the first “Parent-Son Day” was held in 1953.The weekend kicked off with a gala Friday night in the Duncan Student Center, which featured music, food, dancing, cash bars and opportunities for photographs and caricature drawings. Saturday’s events included academic programs, Mass and the President’s dinner. The weekend concluded with a brunch Sunday in the Dahnke Ballroom. Sophia Lauber | The Observer Juniors and their parents eat at a brunch Sunday, which culminated the Junior Parents Weekend festivities.This year was the second year that the Duncan Student Center was available for use for the event, so, while JPW executive chair junior Eric Kim said that the committee followed a lot of precedents established last year, there were also a few changes made to the gala — the biggest of these changes being the decision to expand the opening gala to Corbett Family Hall.“I believe that student activities and division of student affairs will do this again,” Kim said. “It definitely eased the traffic that Duncan had last year and improved the crowd control.”Another notable change was the addition of more cash bars at the gala, a development that was implemented in response to complaints about the lengths of lines from last year.With the improved flow of crowds, Friday night went smoothly, except for a small incident with an elevator that got stuck. Kim said while he did not know the details of what happened, he saw a large group of people exiting the elevator shouting with excitement.“Someone told me they were stuck for an hour and 15 minutes or so,” he said.  “It must’ve been claustrophobic. Hopefully they made some good memories.”Overall, Kim said that he believes the weekend is an “opportunity for junior parents to explore our spiritual, academic and social lifestyle here at Notre Dame.”The academic programs that took place Saturday morning gave parents an opportunity to experience their students’ academic lifestyle within the University, especially those in the College of Arts and Letters, junior Shady Girgis said in an email.“I hope the parents that attended the Arts and Letters program got a good idea of what a true liberal arts education at Notre Dame looks like,” Girgis said. “Also, I hope they realize the absolutely open world their children can explore upon graduation with the mentorship and guidance of the incredible faculty we have in the College of Arts and Letters.”Another goal of this year’s committee was to carry on the efforts of last year’s committee to make the weekend’s events affordable for more juniors, Kim said.“Our main goal was to establish more publicity with the Office of Student Enrichment, so in every email that we sent out before tickets sales, we incorporated the idea that financial assistance is available for students that are in need of it and that do want the assistance,” he said.Kim said he believes this year’s committee was successful in increasing the number of students who applied for assistance.Junior Takunda Ushe said he was originally not planning on having his parents attend JPW until his rector reached out to him and encouraged him to look into financial assistance. With the help of the Office of Student Enrichment, Ushe was able to have both his local host mom and his parents from South Africa attend JPW. Ushe said the weekend was a big deal for both him and his parents, who have never been to Notre Dame or the United States before.“I think I navigate between two worlds — my life before Notre Dame and my life at Notre Dame,” Ushe said. “To have those two worlds come together is just like everything coming full circle for me. It still feels surreal. I would never think that I would have my parents walking down in front of the grotto or the main building. It’s just unthinkable.”The weekend offered Ushe and many other junior students the opportunity to share with their parents the aspects of Notre Dame’s community that cannot fully be expressed in words, Ushe said.“No one has told them about the whole educating not just the mind but also the soul — they just saw that for themselves,” Ushe said.Tags: JPW, Junior Parents Weekend, Office of Student Enrichmentlast_img read more

Syracuse erases last season’s painful memories with comeback win over Missouri, becomes bowl eligible

first_img Related Stories BOWLED OVER: Syracuse stuns Missouri with late touchdown, clinches bowl eligibility for 2nd time in 3 yearsGallery: Syracuse gains bowl eligibility with 31-27 win at Missouri COLUMBIA, Mo. — This year, there was no free fall. Only resilience.As Syracuse flooded Faurot Field inside Memorial Stadium late Saturday night, the joy of a bowl-clinching upset was made sweeter by last season’s failures. Five straight losses, increasingly poor performances, a despair-filled trip from the top of the Big East to bowl-less irrelevance.It spelled turmoil within a program only one year removed from its first bowl appearance since 2004, and it pained a coach who blamed himself for every miscue.“The last half of last season left a bad taste in a lot of young guys’ mouths and a lot of upcoming seniors, which is guys like me,” Syracuse defensive tackle Deon Goggins said. “We never wanted to be in that position again.”Saturday’s win ensured that Goggins, a senior, never will be.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textRelying on a never-say-die attitude that was absent one season ago, Syracuse (6-5, 4-2 Big East) erased a double-digit deficit on Saturday on the road against Missouri (5-6, 2-5 Southeastern Conference) to earn its sixth win and become bowl eligible for the first time since 2010. The 31-27 win, which came on a last-second scoring drive and stunned the crowd of 63,045, was the Orange’s fourth win in its last five games at a point in time where it imploded last year.Instead of the disheartened and agitated Marrone from 2011, Saturday’s version of the Syracuse head coach was pleased and relieved. “If I have to start off with a statement — oof, what a game,” Marrone said, as he smiled throughout much of his postgame press conference.He’s transformed a team that was once 2-4 overall into a legitimate contender in the Big East, and by beating the Tigers he guided the Orange to its first win over a team from the SEC since September of 2001.“I can’t tell you how proud I am of these kids,” Marrone said. “The leadership, the stuff on the sideline when you look in their eyes, the confidence that’s building in them.”And on Saturday, that confidence began to build after halftime when the Syracuse defense finally slowed down Missouri and quarterback James Franklin. The Tigers had stormed out of the gates in the first quarter, surging to a 17-3 lead by slicing the Orange secondary for chunks of yards at a time.But a late touchdown drive by Syracuse closed the gap to seven before halftime, and the tweaks made by defensive coordinator Scott Shafer yielded zero third-quarter points.“Coach Shafer is a great defensive coordinator that is great at getting our adjustments down so we can go out there and just play,” Goggins said. “And that’s what you saw in the second half, our adjustments and just going out in the second half and playing.”By the 14-minute mark of the fourth quarter, the Orange had rallied back to tie the game at 17-17. And after the Tigers marched downfield for another touchdown, Syracuse matched them once again. Running back Jerome Smith sprinted eight yards up the middle for the tying score, which elicited an emphatic fist pump from offensive line coach Greg Adkins on the sideline.Despite a hostile environment and an opponent with arguably more individual talent, the Orange responded not once, but twice in a 10-minute span.“That comes with just leadership, great leadership,” SU safety Shamarko Thomas said. “I feel like last year was different from this year. We have great leaders in Ryan Nassib, Alec Lemon, Justin Pugh and Siriki Diabate and me. And it just came out and showed.”So on a third-and-1 play with less than two minutes remaining, Thomas and Diabate anchored the biggest defensive stop of the game. With the Tigers already in field goal range, a first down would have allowed them to run down the clock and attempt a game-winning field goal. But the Orange stuffed Missouri running back Kendial Lawrence for a three-yard loss, forcing a field goal by Andrew Baggett.It gave the ball to Nassib with 1:43 remaining and an opportunity to display the fortitude that Syracuse lacked over the final half of 2011. Seven plays later, the Orange found the end zone, with Lemon hauling in a 17-yard score to secure the win.“It’s incredible,” Lemon said. “This is all the hard work that we put in to go to a bowl game.”It’s work that many of the players have admitted was neglected last season. A blowout win over West Virginia midway through the year prompted relaxation, they said, and shifted eyes to the bigger picture instead of the immediate future.Saturday night undid all that, erasing painful memories and ensuring the Orange will have a 13th game. It allowed Marrone to smile and Thomas to beam and offensive coordinator Nathaniel Hackett to gush.But more important than that it allowed Cameron Lynch to roll along the turf — imitating a certain type of ball — once the final Missouri pass was intercepted.Said Lynch: “That was bowling, baby.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on November 18, 2012 at 8:36 am Contact Michael: [email protected] | @Michael_Cohen13last_img read more