Have Taken All Possible Steps To Ensure Sanctity Of Electoral Roll, EC Tells Kerala High Court

first_imgNews UpdatesHave Taken All Possible Steps To Ensure Sanctity Of Electoral Roll, EC Tells Kerala High Court Lydia Suzanne Thomas30 March 2021 1:35 AMShare This – xIn a Statement presented before the High Court today, the Election Commission has submitted that it has taken all possible steps to ensure that the sanctity of the electoral roll is maintained, and no person is allowed to cast an unauthorized vote in the upcoming Kerala Legislative Assembly elections. The Commission’s statement is a response to a petition filed by Kerala Leader of…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginIn a Statement presented before the High Court today, the Election Commission has submitted that it has taken all possible steps to ensure that the sanctity of the electoral roll is maintained, and no person is allowed to cast an unauthorized vote in the upcoming Kerala Legislative Assembly elections. The Commission’s statement is a response to a petition filed by Kerala Leader of Opposition Ramesh Chennithala alleging the existence of bogus voters and double entries of voters in the electoral rolls prepared by the Election Commission. A Bench of Chief Justice S Manikumar and Justice Shaji P Chaly is seized of the matter presently.Pursuant to an intensive analysis of data provided by political parties on the issue of multiple entries, out or 316671 entries, as on today, the Commission has been able to identity only 38586 DSE in respect Legislative Assembly constituencies in the State, the Commission informs the Court via this statement. In its statement filed by the Commission’s Standing Counsel Deepu Lal Mohan, the Commission lays out the procedure for the alteration of the electoral list. Submitting that the electoral roll is dynamic to make provision for the migration/deletion of voters and new entries, it is stated that the process of deleting entries is far more stringent. This is so as to avoid any wrongful deletion which may deprive an eligible elector from his voting right, the Commission’s statement explains. One example of how a double vote is created is where there are instances of an elector getting enrolled at his new residence while not applying for deletion at the old address, the Statement reveals. To overcome these difficulties, the Commission details certain steps to ensure no voter places more than one vote, *ldentification of Demographically-Similar Entries (DSEs) through Software *Table top verification by Electoral Roll Officer (ERO) *Field verification through Booth Level Officers (BLO) *Taking Form -7 and removal of entries after proper service of notice The Commission places on record that it has been receiving complaints about wrongful deletions. To prevent such instances from repeating, extra safeguards have been put in. For this reason, in all cases where it is proposed to delete an electoral entry, Form-7 is a must. The test/verification will be carried out by EROs, supervised and checked by Deputy DEO/DEO/Roll Observer and Chief Electoral Officer. Significantly, the Commission places on record that all deletion lists proposed as well as final are shared with political parties and posted on the website. A software is used to generate and flag DSEs, lists of which would be handed to the State or Union Territory Chief Electoral Officers. After a physical verification by booth level officers, the lists are updated. Past experience shows that not all these turn out to be duplicates as in several instances different electors are having same names, father’s name, age & gender and hence cannot be deleted. These are marked as Non-DSE in the system (i.e. these are different electors and should not be flagged again as DSE in future). To ensure that DSEs that persist and creep in after the electoral rolls are frozen are not allowed to vote more than once, another mechanism is used to generate a list of Absentee, Shifted and Duplicate/Dead Voters to prevent personation (ASD list), the Statement lays out. It is stated, “If any person listed in the ASD list turns up for voting, his identity has to be verified thoroughly before allowing the person to vote. At the polling Station, such elector would be required to prove his/her identity by producing either EPIC or any of the alternative documents prescribed by the Commission for identificaltion. Besides, thumb impression of such elector would mandatorily be taken in Register of Voters (Form 17A). Extra precautions have been prescribed to be taken at the polling station so as to ensure that those found in ASD list could not vote more than once. Further as an abundant caution all DEOs have been instructed to capture photographs of all ASD voters.” It is revealed that in Kerala, the electoral list for the upcoming election was frozen on March 19, 2021. Averring that the Commission has taken all steps to ensure no voter votes more than once, the Commission prays for suitable direction from the Court.As a rejoinder to the statement, Chennithala through his counsel Advocate Asaf Ali sought the following measures to be taken in addition to those listed by the Commission:- Those persons who have been found to have more than one vote have to communicate to the Commission where they intend to vote.- All Photographs already uploaded should be examined by use of a software.- Those who currently have two votes have to upload their photos in the Commission server.- Those who have voted once must submit undertaking to the effect that they have voted only once. Pertinently, at the previous hearing of the case yesterday, the Court recorded a finding that there was prima facie material to demonstrate discrepancies in the final voters list prepared by the Election Commission of India (Commission).In this context the Bench ruled,”We are of the view that a voter should be permitted to cast only one vote, wherever his name is registered.”Therefore the Court ordered the Commission to ensure that there is no double voting by any voter with sufficient State / Central force posted at all voting places, to ensure fair and democratic election.Next Storylast_img read more

Teekay LNG swings to profit

first_imgTeekay LNG Partners, one of the world’s largest owners of LNG carriers, swung back to profit in the second quarter of 2018.The partnership reported a net income of $2.7 million for the quarter under review, compared to a net loss of $6.9 million in the first quarter of the year and a net loss of $16 million reported in the corresponding period in 2017.The adjusted net income dropped to $13.5 million from $22 million in the previous quarter and $17.8 million in the second quarter of 2017.The net income increase has been positively impacted by the deliveries of seven liquefied natural gas (LNG) and three LPG carrier newbuildings between July 2017 and May 2018 and the commencement of short-term charter contracts for certain of the vessels in the Partnership’s 52 percent-owned joint venture with Marubeni Corporation, the company said in its report.The company’s president and CEO, Mark Kremin said that it has “experienced another quarter of increased earnings and cash flow from” LNG carriers.“We have taken delivery of nine LNG carriers over the past nine months, including the Myrina and the Megara in early-May and mid-July 2018, respectively, both of which are on long-term, fixed-rate charters to Shell, and we are anticipating the delivery of the Bahrain Spirit FSU later this month,” Kremin said.Quarterly voyage revenues increased during the period under review, reaching $122 million compared to $100 million reported in the quarter ending June 30, 2017.last_img read more

Northern players shine at St Rule Trophy

first_img The St Rule Trophy, played over the New and Old courses at St Andrews, turned into a Cheshire and Lancashire celebration thanks to Emma Goddard, Bethany Garton, Emily Taylor, Charlotte Wild and Brogan Townend. Emma Goddard (Royal Liverpool Ladies’) was runner-up on five-under par for the 54-hole event, finishing two shots behind the winner, Scottish champion Laura Murray. Emma (image © Leaderboard Photography) had posted the clubhouse target of five-under-par 222 with half the field still to come in, after scoring four-under-par 72 in the final round on the Old Course. In the end only Laura Murray overhauled the Cheshire player. Emma had a startling recovery from a double bogey six at the comparatively simple first hole when she birdied the next five holes and also the ninth to be out in four-under-par 34. She bogeyed the 11th but birdied the 13th in level par 38 home. Bethany Garton (Royal Lytham & St Annes, Lancashire) saved her best to last, shooting the low score of the tournament in the final round with a six-under 70 which lifted her into a share of third place on her debut appearance. The 18-year-old had 31 putts in a bogey-free round. Irish strokeplay champion Emily Taylor (Royal Lytham & St Annes) won the U18 event for the Lawson Trophy. Her final round of 71 was the joint second best and included six birdies with just one bogey. The field of 17 competitors aged U18 was a record for the tournament, which was first played in 1984. Overall, Emily tied for seventh place with Charlotte Wild (Mere, Cheshire), who had a great run in the middle of the final round with birdies on the fourth-fifth-sixth and then on the eighth-ninth-tenth. Charlotte is a past English strokeplay champion. Charlotte, Emily and Brogan Townend (Pleasington, Lancashire) combined to give England second place in the international team event, two shots behind the winners, Scotland. Leading final scores Par 227 New Course (first round) par 75, CSS 76 Old Course par 76, CSS 78 76 220 Laura Murray (Alford) 73 74 73 222 Emma Goddard (Royal Liverpool Ladies) 75 72 72 223 Bethany Garton (Royal Lytham) 74 79 70, Jenny Haglund (Sweden) 73 78 72, Louise Kenney (Pitreavie) 74 75 74 224 Megan Briggs (Kilmacolm) 76 77 71 225 Emily M Taylor (Royal Lytham) 76 78 71, Charlotte Wild (Mere) 78 73 74 226 Eilidh Briggs (Kilmacolm) 76 74 76 227 Jessica Meek (Carnoustie Ladies) 75 77 75 228 Jane Turner (Craigielaw) 76 76 76, Clara Young (North Berwick) 79 76 73, Kelsey MacDonald (Nairn Dunbar) 77 78 73 231 Emilie Lundstrom (Sweden) 78 81 72 232 Lesley Atkins (Gullane Ladies)  74 75 83, Ailsa Summers (Carnoustie Ladies) 80 76 76, Ami Storey (Ponteland) 79 77 76, Jess Wilcox (Blankney) 78 79 75 233 Chloe Williams (Wrexham) 79 79 75, Gabriella Cowley (West Essex) 74 77 82, Alyson McKechin (Elderslie) 76 85 72 234 Rachael McQueen (Troon Ladies) 78 80 76, Susan Jackson (Ladybank) 77 78 79 235 Hannah McCook (Grantown on Spey) 80 78 77, Lauren Blease (Burhill) 76 81 78, Samantha Birks (Wolstanton) 75 83 77, Joelle Van Baarle (Belgium) 82 78 75, Brogan Townend (Pleasington) 76 81 78 6 Jun 2012 Northern players shine at St Rule Trophy last_img read more

Leafs look to build on first win of season

first_imgThe Nelson Leafs will be looking to add to its one-game winning streak when the club visits Grand Forks Border Bruins in Kootenay International Junior Hockey League action tonight in the Boundary City.The Leafs, 1-4 to start the season, are still smarting from a 6-2 pounding the club took at the hands of the Bruins and hope to right the wrong of a week ago.“The game in Grand Forks we had kind of a depleted lineup,” said Leaf coach Chris Shaw, who picked up his first win of the season Sunday against Penticton Lakers. “That was kind of a weird hockey game where all of their six goals came on the power play.” The good thing for the Leafs is the Green and White have had little time to forget, which could be bad for the Bruins.Saturday, the road to respectability doesn’t get any easier as the high-flying Fernie Ghostriders visit the NDCC Arena.The ‘Riders are unbeaten in four games, and leaders of the Eddie Mountain Division, heading into the weekend. Fernie boasts former Beaver Valley scoring leader Scott Morisseau and Jordie Cool as offensive weapons.Morisseau, with seven points in four games, had 84 points last season for the Hawks. Game time is 7 p.m.Look for Marcus Beesley and Darren Hogg to continue to split the goaltending duties for Nelson.Nelson hosts Spokane Braves Wednesday at the NDCC [email protected]last_img read more

Dimestore Fishermen TV series featuring Nelson airs Friday and Saturday

first_imgDimestore Fishermen is an outdoor fishing TV show that focuses on more than just fishing.Show creator Jim Hoey brought his team to the Heritage City on the invitation of Kerry Reed of Reel Adventures Fishing Charters to bring to the rest of North America what Nelsonites have known for years.”We try to focus on the cultural, historical and recreational aspects of communities we visit as much as the actual fishing,” Hoey, in his 12th season as host of Dimestore Fisherman, said during an interview with The Nelson Daily in the fall.“So moving around Nelson, all of Nelson’s natural character came out. We had the opportunity to have a special guest on the water … Mayor John Dooley is a great ambassador of this community.” And several Nelsonites stepped up and gave the crew the character and the natural beauty of the city from people who have lived here their whole lives, added Hoey, the father of three wonderful children. The crew fished on Kootenay Lake for four days in late October, obtaining more than enough footage of the best of what Kootenay Lake has to offer in the way of great fish. All fish caught were released.“(Jim Hoey and) the crew were very impressed with what they saw and they were definitely treated to an amazing experience,” said Reed, who began courting Hoey in March. “I think we highlighted our community in a very positive way and it will reflect in the final product of the TV episode.” Nelson will be showcased once again on television, this time as part of the Dimestore Fishermen series appearing on the World Fishing Network (WFN) Friday.The episode shot on Kootenay Lake in the fall of 2011 is on Channel 152 on Shaw TV. Airtimes are Friday at 2 p.m. and 10 p.m. and Saturday 6 a.m. All ties PDT.last_img read more

Kootenay Ice outlast South Island to get back into win column

first_imgCoy Prevost of Kimberley, Amour, Klimchuk, Mitch Titus of Montrose and Nelson’s Sawyer Hunt scored for Kootenay which held periods leads of 2-1 and 3-1.Saturday South Island scored twice in the final 40 minutes to edge Kootenay 4-2.Kyle Chernenoff of Crescent Valley and Prevost scored in the first period as the teams played to a 2-2 tie.South Island took the lead for good with a second period goal before icing the game with a third period insurance marker.The Ice host the Cariboo Cougars of Prince George Saturday at 12:30 p.m. in the NDCC Arena.Sunday the teams play in the Civic Arena. Puck drop is 10:15 a.m. The Kootenay Ice have suffered their share of losses this BC Hockey Major Midget League season.But the Ice can boast a better record than a season ago after outlasting South Island Royals 5-4 Sunday in Major Midget action Sunday in Victoria.Trail’s Ross Armour, Kadrian Klimchuk of Castlegar and Austin Tambellini of Nelson each finished with two points to lead the Ice to the narrow victory.Kootenay now sports a 4-21-5 record for 13 points.last_img read more

This is another great test of the Nelson Leafs

first_imgSporting a 3-3 record, the Nelson Leafs play host to hottest team in the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League, Murdoch Division leading Beaver Valley Nitehawks, Friday at the NDCC Arena.The Hawks have been tearing up the league, outscoring the opposition 29-13 en route to a six-game winning streak to open the campaign.“It’s early in the year,” said Leaf coach and GM Dave McLellan when asked about the tail of two different teams taking to the ice for the 7 p.m. puck drop Friday.“It’s not like we’re getting blown out in our games. We’re out shooting most of the teams we’ve played against.”Some of the Leafs troubles have been the tough, early season schedule McLellan penciled in during the summer and the roster filled with younger, but skilled, players needing understand the difference between junior and minor hockey.Nelson has played league heavyweights like Kelowna, Fernie and Osoyoos, all in the first month of the season.“I did that on purpose . . . schedule us against a lot of the top teams,” McLellan explained. “It provides us with a benchmark of  where our team is in the league.”Beaver Valley has been led by 20-year-old forwards Braden Fuller and Jace Weegar, and set-up man Allan Pruss, leading the Hawkls with eight assists.Nelson travels to Spokane Sunday to meet the Braves in an afternoon encounter.The Leafs defeated Spokane 4-1 in the first meeting of the season.
New players join the Leafs McLellan told The Nelson Daily he’s added a few new players to the roster, a little earlier than the skipper previously thought would happen.Tyler Garia, who played for Nelson in the past, arrives in camp from 100 Mile House Wranglers to provide some much-needed leadership on the forward line for the Leafs. “Tyler is a 20-year-old forward we’re looking to to help some of our younger players learn how to score,” McLellan explained.“We’ve got 14 rookies on this team who are very skilled but are not used to playing at the junior level.”Garcia, from Anchorage, Alaska, played 26 games for Nelson in 2013-14 before being traded to Kimberley Dynamiters.He started the next season with Kimberley before being dispatched to 100 Mile House.Also expected in camp soon is defenceman Austin Anselmo, who was released by Coquitlam Express of the BC Hockey League.Players in, Players outMcLellan said forward Timothy Nichols should be back after missing the past four games due to injury.However, captain Rayce Miller is gone for both weekend games after being hit with a two-game suspension.Miller twice was whistled for goaltender interference penalties during Friday, September 25 against Princeton Posse.The two goalie infractions carries an automatic two-game sit.Green and White Rotation between the Pipes It’s goaltending by committee to start the season for the Leafs as the coaching staff continues to rotate goalies.McLellan said both Joseph Barton and Everett Yasinski will continue to see action as the Leafs sort out the the net minding position.Parent to fill seats on Parent WeekendNext weekend Nelson hosts three games at the NDCC Arena as the franchise welcomes the parents to the Heritage City to see the players in action.Nelson meets Golden Rockets, Friday, Beaver Valley, Saturday, and Summerland Steam, Sunday.last_img read more

JOURNALIST JOHN WATERS VISITS MOVILLE TO SEE SITE OF PLANNED SEWAGE PIPE

first_imgResidents meet John WatersThe renowned Irish Times journalist John Waters has travelled to Donegal to visit the site of the proposed controversial Waste Water Treatment Plant and it’s associated discharge pipe in the town land of Carnagarve midway between Moville and Greencastle.He was provided with details of the sewage plant and pipe by members of the Campaign for a Clean Estuary Group and local residents.Said Enda Craig, from the campaign group: “Mr Waters was highly impressed with the beauty of the area and it’s surroundings. “He has stated that he will make a return journey at some point in the future and will also study in detail the information provided to him.”Last week the European Commission launched an investigation into Donegal County Council’s handling of the dispute, which has been running since 1989. JOURNALIST JOHN WATERS VISITS MOVILLE TO SEE SITE OF PLANNED SEWAGE PIPE was last modified: January 19th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:CarnagarveGreencastleIrish TimesJohn Watersmovillelast_img read more

What You Are Not Being Told About Earth’s Magnetic Field

first_imgAll you need to know is right here: (1) scientists don’t understand it, and (2) without it we would be dead. Read more if you dare.In New Scientist‘s piece, “The paradox powering earth’s magnetic field,” Marcus Woo knows that we rely on our magnetic field:IT IS Earth’s silent defender. Without it, a constant onslaught of charged particles would bombard our planet’s atmosphere, changing its chemistry and disrupting our electronic infrastructure. Assuming any of that stuff was even there to disrupt. In Earth’s infancy, our guardian may have prevented the sun’s action from stripping away the protective bubble of gas surrounding our planet entirely, and so allowed life – and eventually intelligent life – to flourish.But then Woo reveals a tale of scientific nakedness covered by fig leaves. First, the fig leaves:This silent defender is Earth’s magnetic field, a force field whose source lies in the churning molten iron that forms the planet’s core. Electrons flowing through this fluid generate an electric current, which in turn creates a magnetic field. The core is a giant, self-sustaining electromagnet: a dynamo.Now, the unveiling:That’s been the general story for decades. But over the last few years, it has run into a problem. Evidence is mounting that the dynamo could only have emerged comparatively recently. At the same time, geological clues show that the magnetic field has existed for most of Earth’s 4.5-billion-year history. This contradiction – an ancient magnetic field without anything to power it – is forcing us to rethink our planet’s insides.Not a pretty sight. No dynamo? That’s dynamite.Marcus Woo is a moyboy, of course, not questioning the consensus age of the earth. Now, however, the moyboy position leads to a contradiction. What to do? Geophysicists need a dynamo tale for their billions of years, but can’t find a place to plug it in. What powers the convection that’s supposed to generate the field?So it seems that one way or another, the dynamo has been kept turning for most of Earth’s history. But it’s here we encounter the most recent twist in this magnetic tale. In the past few years, researchers have begun to doubt whether the first part of the story, thermal convection, could ever have happened – and if it did, whether it would have been strong enough to power the magnetic field. “If you want to rely on thermal convection alone, then we’re in trouble,” says David Stevenson at the California Institute of Technology.The fig leaves came off recently. Woo quotes Francis Nimmo: “Five years ago, everyone thought they knew the answer.” Under the best theoretical models, the dynamo could not have gotten jumpstarted till a billion years ago, billions of years after the earth’s emergence as a planet. But without it running from the beginning, life would have cooked under an atmosphere doing a striptease in the hot sun.Woo doesn’t want to leave the models naked. He brings in some tailors. One guy dresses the model with magnesium; another, with silicon. Others try entertainment till some covering arrives. Ever seen the Wobble Dance? The Jostle Dance? They sound lun-ey if not risque.Some researchers have even suggested that convection may not drive the dynamo at all. Instead, Earth’s wobbling rotation could jostle the molten iron. Or the moon’s gravity could tug the liquid core in the same way it causes ocean tides. “There’s a group of people that are enthusiastic about the idea, but I would say it’s probably not mainstream,” says Bruce Buffet at the University of California, Berkeley.For now, “everything’s up in the air,” Woo laments. Even the fig leaves. Try not to think about it.At the moment, everything’s up in the air. Even the thermal conductivity calculations could be wrong. In fact, a study contradicting Hirose’s measurements ran alongside his in the same scientific journal. “This is a fast-moving field,” Nimmo says. “I don’t think we have a completely satisfactory answer.”And you thought the tale of the Earth’s magnetic field was as elegant as Melanie Trump’s inauguration gown by Ralph Lauren. Sorry; that was only the textbook drawing for the TV animators. The real tailors are threadbare, leaving their critics in stitches.And that’s what you are not being told. The secular geophysicists can’t power the magnetic field or keep it going, and they can’t live without it. All these problems ensue because they’re moyboys. Take away the requirement for millions and billions of years: problem (1) solved. Think of it as intelligently designed for human life: problem (2) solved. So what’s the problem? Not evidence, but worldview commitment. (Visited 216 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Accounting for Renewable Electricity Savings

first_imgAccounting for ‘source’ and ‘site’ energy useThe underlying issue, and DOE’s updated thinking, rests on some rather arcane accounting treatment that distinguishes between “site” energy and “source” energy. Site energy is the amount of electricity used at a home or business (i.e., the kilowatt-hours consumed by lights, appliances and equipment); source energy is the amount of energy used at power plants to generate and deliver that electricity to the site. What’s next?There are a number of other issues that remain to be addressed in improving energy accounting, several of which are raised but not answered in DOE’s paper. These include the appropriate treatment of other low-emissions generation, e.g., nuclear and fossil fuel power plants that use carbon capture and storage technology; consideration of marginal rather than average power plants (marginal power plants are those that are affected by an increase or decrease in load, and don’t necessarily have the same carbon intensity as the average generating fleet); avoiding stakeholder confusion and ensuring continuity with historical data when shifting to a more appropriate methodology; choosing the right source accounting methodology for the decision at hand; and thinking about how to weigh up these issues in policy-making.It would be great if DOE would embark on a broader process to work through some of those important issues, something that NRDC has previously proposed. The constructive contributions of various stakeholders in the current effort indicate that such a process would be valuable and productive.And more broadly, perhaps it’s time to consider adopting metrics that get closer to the core of society’s interests of superior consumer and business impact, reducing carbon and other harmful emissions, cost, reliability, and security. That would surely be a longer-term transition, as much of federal energy policy revolves around energy use and energy savings as key metrics, with a very good track record of success.Finally, the importance of getting these accounting items right will only grow over time as the nation’s energy mix becomes cleaner, leading to a deeply decarbonized, and economically vibrant energy future. DOE has taken a great step in that direction. Because only about 30% of the fuel that goes into the average fossil fuel power plant on the nation’s grid is ultimately delivered as electricity to a consumer’s site (with the rest lost as waste heat at the power plant or in the grid), source energy accounting for fossil fuel plants indicates energy use that is about three times higher than site energy accounting.New high efficiency natural gas power plants, while not nearly as low-emitting as wind or solar, are far more efficient than the average units on the grid and a big step forward, converting closer to 50% of the fuel into useful delivered electricity.Accounting for source energy of different energy options can be informative for good policy; e.g., in comparing the amount of energy used to make hot water for households with either an electric or natural gas water heater, it makes sense to compare the amount of energy that would be used to deliver the natural gas to the water heater and operate it, with the energy that would be used in the grid to make the electricity used in the electric water heater.Ignoring the fact that about two-thirds of the fossil fuel energy used in making electricity is lost as waste heat in the power plant and in the transmission and distribution system would give the incorrect impression that an electric water heater uses much less energy than a gas one. Furnace efficiency standards: source accounting might matterDOE’s current standards-setting process for household natural gas furnaces is an excellent example of where proper source accounting could matter. In developing the proposed standard, DOE’s detailed analysis found that while a stronger standard will deliver great consumer and environmental benefits overall, some fraction of households that currently use natural gas furnaces would switch to electric heating, due to a combination of installation challenges in special circumstances and higher up-front costs.Using its traditional source accounting approach, DOE estimated that while the stronger standard would save about 7 quads (quadrillion Btu) of natural gas energy, electricity used for heating would increase by about 4.3 quads, resulting in a net savings of 2.8 quads.However, if DOE had used an updated source accounting methodology and the assumption that 50% of generation is from non-fossil fuel power plants sources by 2040 (e.g., including wind, solar, hydro, and nuclear), the 7 quads of natural gas energy savings would be offset by closer to only 3 quads of increased fossil fuel used for generating electricity, for a net savings of 4 quads.So would the standard save 2.8 quads or 4 quads of energy? That’s a big difference, and might be enough to sway policy-makers to consider a different choice.Of course, the standards-setting process involves balancing a host of issues — notably including consumer, environmental, and business impacts — and not just total energy savings; there’s not a direct link between the estimated total savings and the ultimate policy decision.Further, while the furnace standards highlight the growing importance of this accounting issue, it makes sense to start thinking about the implications for future policy, rather than suggest a significant and sudden change in the current standards process. A good next step from DOEDOE has proposed a sensible, transparent methodology that it calls “captured energy” for setting the source energy of renewable electricity generation. The captured energy methodology assigns a source energy value to renewable electricity that is exactly equal to the electricity produced, with no losses other than those in transmission and distribution from the generator to the site. This approach is a big improvement.Notably, while the impact of adopting the captured energy methodology is relatively small under today’s energy mix (i.e., with relatively little wind and solar compared to that which is anticipated by 2040), it will grow considerably over the coming decades.For example, DOE’s illustrative example shows that the more sensible captured energy methodology could reduce the estimated grid average source energy by about 30%. And to be clear, a major increase in renewable electricity is already on the way due to improving economics and policies such as strong renewable portfolio standards adopted in several states. Robin Roy is a consultant for the National Resource Defense Council. This post was first posted at the NRDC website. By ROBIN ROYHow much does it matter if energy efficiency programs like Energy Star or appliance energy standards save electricity generated by renewable resources like wind and solar, rather than from fossil fuel power plants? Certainly from the perspective of reducing carbon pollution, there’s a strong case that saving renewable electricity is not as valuable as saving energy generated from burning fossil fuels.As the role of renewable electricity in the nation’s electricity supply grows, this question will become increasingly important to think through.Recognizing this, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took a great step forward to update its thinking and approach, with a report released in October. NRDC joined with the American Public Power Association, the Edison Electric Institute, and the National Rural Electric Cooperatives Association to request that DOE rethink these issues and also joined in commenting on DOE’s initial thoughts earlier this year.DOE’s efforts were further aided by thoughtful input from the natural gas industry, which also has great interest in getting the accounting right. The overall result at DOE shows that constructive, collaborative efforts can deliver real progress. RELATED ARTICLES Understanding Energy UnitsOur All-Renewable Energy FutureShould the DOE Increase Furnace Efficiency Standards?Refrigerators Get New Efficiency StandardsNew Furnaces Will Be More Efficient A key challengeWhile using source accounting makes sense, the key challenge is that DOE has traditionally used “fossil fuel equivalency” when accounting for renewable electricity. In this approach, the source value assigned to renewable electricity is based on the average source energy of all fossil fuel power plants on the grid.That’s entirely artificial, and suggests that a kWh of clean wind or solar power raises the same concern as a kWh from the oldest, least efficient, dirtiest fossil fuel power plant — and that’s just not right. As the supply of clean renewable electricity increases over the coming decades, the fossil fuel equivalency approach would become increasingly misleading and unhelpful for policymakers.So what’s the right number to use? It might be possible to come up with a technically accurate source number for wind and solar (e.g., relating to the fraction of wind energy blowing across the countryside that is captured by a wind turbine, or the fraction of sunlight that is converted into electricity in a photovoltaic panel). However, to be clear, that source accounting approach doesn’t have a bearing on what society cares about, e.g., the carbon emissions of those generators, so that wouldn’t be of much use or interest for policy-making, either.last_img read more