OC Girls & Coaches Ready for Their Shot at Girls Under 15 National Lacrosse…

first_imgNew Jersey South All Stars coaches Abby Mullen.4 Ocean City will be well-represented July 19-21 at the Girls’ Under 15 U.S. Lacrosse Championships, to take place in Westfield Indiana, a suburb of Indianapolis.Not only will there be six current or future members of the Red Raiders participating as part of the NJ South All Stars, but the squad is coached by Abby Mullen, the Raiders’ Head JV coach and assistant varsity coach and a physical education teacher at the high school; and Mikenzie Helphenstine, a third grade teacher at Ocean City Primary School and freshman field hockey coach at OCHS.  Mikenzie also coaches lacrosse for the Upper Twp./Ocean City Warriors recreation league squad.“The team looks good,” Mullen said Thursday night following their last formal practice prior to leaving for Indianapolis.The squad then chowed down on pizza provided by Tony P’s House of Pies.Incoming Ocean City Freshmen Abbey Fenton, Emma Finnegan Abigail Bennett and Ashley Devlin will be joined on the All Star squad by Sophomores Danielle Donoghue, and Ali Hendricks.Ocean City participants include (from left) Emma Finnegan, Danielle Donoghue, Coach Abby Mullen, Ashley Devlin, Abbey Fenton and Ali HendricksTeam members were nominated by their school or recreation league coaches and survived a two-day tryout camp. Other local players include Ava Wells, Aubrey Hunter, Kira Sides and Madison Barber, all of Middle Twp., Robin Spector of Mainland, Sophia Facenda of Holy Spirit and Taylor Herr of Ocean Township.The coaches praised the players’ parents, who financed their travel costs, Beth Serughetti of US Lacrosse’s South Jersey chapter, which paid for uniforms and coaches’ expenses, and Seneca High School, which provided practice facilities.The team will fly out of Philadelphia on Monday night and play their first game Tuesday morning in pool play, a 9 a.m. contest against Top Guns Purple of New York. Other teams in South Jersey’s pool include Lacrosse Monkey (Minnesota) and Team 180 2019 of Colorado. Following pool play, the teams are seeded from pool results and they advance to elimination play.Fenton, the goalie, and Donoghue played in the tournament last year and provide veteran leadership for the rest of the squad, Mullen said.“It is an interesting tournament because we get to play against teams from other regions of the country with completely different styles of play,” Helphenstine said. “I think we have a chance to go out there and play well.  But more importantly it is a great experience for the girls and an opportunity for them to have fun.”She said the games take place in the mornings to allow the girls to experience Indianapolis the rest of the day.“We talked about some of the things we wanted to do and the girls really want to go zip lining,” said Helphenstine said.  “So I guess we will be zip lining,” she said with a laugh.last_img read more

Lending pros share pandemic-fueled lending lessons

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Credit unions have been learning a lot about their capacity to lend during the coronavirus pandemic, and we’re not talking about just liquidity.As members were thrown out of work or saw their income otherwise plummet, their financial cooperatives responded with low-interest loans, forgiving terms, and flexibility in getting the deals done even while members and staff alike were often stuck at home.That commitment extended to beyond just existing members, as many credit unions stepped up to help non-members apply for job-saving Paycheck Protection Program loans that were dispensed by the hundreds of billions across the country.This week, cooperatives from Oregon, Nevada, Kansas, Indiana, and Ohio share what they’ve learned about themselves and lending as a critical member service along the way. continue reading »last_img read more

Whicker: Frank Robinson played the game for keeps

first_imgPreviousBaltimore Orioles outfielder Frank Robinson, the American League’s Most Valuable Player in 1966, was presented with a plaque symbolic of the award in Baltimore, April 28, 1967. League President Joe Cronin presented the Kenesaw Mountain Landis award, named for the late baseball commissioner. Robinson is the first player ever to win the MVP balloting in both the National and American Leagues.(AP Photo)FILE – In this April 2, 2005, file photo, Washington Nationals manager Frank Robinson watches batting practice before a spring training game against the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, in St. Petersburg, Fla. Hall of Famer Frank Robinson, the first black manager in Major League Baseball and the only player to win the MVP award in both leagues, has died. He was 83.(AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)Frank Robinson SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsSan Francisco Giants manager Frank Robinson at a press conference. (By Lonnie Wilson / Oakland Tribune)San Francisco Giant’s Frank Robinson on the field during practice. (Leo Cohen / Oakland Tribune Staff Archives)Published August 21, 1983Frank Robinson, manager of the Cleveland Indians. checks the game’s action while his wife, Barbara keeps an eye on the playing field. (Kenneth Green / Oakland Tribune Staff Archives)Frank Robinson on the field of Candlestick Park after a winning game for the Giants. (By Lonnie Wilson / Oakland Tribune)Giants manager Frank Robinson. (Ron Riesterer / Oakland Tribune)Published January 13, 1982; April 5, 1981.Giants manager Frank Robinson. (Russ Reed / Oakland Tribune)Frank Robinson, with son Kevin, acknowledges his tribute day at Candlestick Park. (Ron Riesterer / Oakland Tribune)Frank Robinson, front, with local children at a baseball clinic put on by the San Francisco Giants. In the left background is Chili Davis. (Roy H. Williams / Oakland Tribune)Published July 15, 1983.Giants general manager Frank Robinson. (Ron Riesterer / Oakland Tribune Staff Archives)Published May 1, 1984.Frank Robinson (L), baseball’s fourth all time home run hitter, congratulates Hank Aaron (R) after the Hank Aaron award was unveiled before the start of the Atlanta Braves and Philadelphia Phillies game at Turner Field in Atlanta, GA 08 April 1999. The award will be determined by the player’s combined numbers of hits, home runs and RBI and is scheduled to be presented to the best hitter in each league Championship Series. (STEVE SCHAEFER/AFP/Getty Images)Sandy Koufax (L), the Hall of Fame Dodgers’ pitcher who makes infrequent public appearances, talks with fellow Hall of Fame member Frank Robinson (R) after they took the stage before induction ceremonies in Cooperstown, NY 26 July. Koufax and Robinson were among the 35 returning Hall of Fame members who attended the ceremonies. (HENNY RAY ABRAMS/AFP/Getty Images)Former Cleveland Indians manager and player Frank Robinson speaks during the unveiling of a new statue commemorating his career prior to the game between the Cleveland Indians and the Kansas City Royals at Progressive Field on May 27, 2017 in Cleveland, Ohio. Frank Robinson became the first African-American manager in Major League history on April 8, 1975, as a player-manager for the Indians.(Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)U.S. President George W. Bush (R) congratulates baseball Hall of Famer Frank Robinson after presenting him with the medal of Freedom during a ceremony at the White House November 9, 2005 in Washington DC. President Bush presented medals to the 2005 Medal of Freedom recipients during a ceremony in the East Room. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)U.S. President George W. Bush shares a laugh with Nationals manager Frank Robinson before throwing out the first pitch at the Washington Nationals home opener before their game against the Arizona Diamondbacks at RFK Stadium April 14, 2005 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)Cal Ripken Jr. of the Baltimore Orioles (R) talks to Frank Robinson, former Orioles player and manager and honorary National League team captain during practice for the Major League All-Star game at Jacobs Field in Cleveland, OH, 07 July. The All-Star Game will be held 08 July. (JEFF HAYNES/AFP/Getty Images)Washington Nationals Frank RobinsonBaseball Hall of Famer Frank Robinson speaks to the media before the Atlanta Braves play the Washington Nationals at Nationals Park on May 9, 2015 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)Baseball Hall of Famer Frank Robinson throws out the first pitch before the Atlanta Braves play the Washington Nationals at Nationals Park on May 9, 2015 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)San Francisco, CA June 10, 1984 – Frank Robinson walks from the pitcher’s mound to the dugout after replacing the pitcher during an Astros verus Giants baseball game. (By Angela Pancrazio / Oakland Tribune)The Cincinnati Reds’ Frank Robinson takes batting practice in this 1956 photo. Robinson, a Hall of Fame player for the Reds and Baltimore Orioles and the only MLB player to ever win the MVP in both leagues, later became the first African-American manager in MLB history as a player-manager for the Cleveland Indians. Robinson passed away Thursday at 83. (AP Photo/File)Baltimore Orioles outfielder Frank Robinson, the American League’s Most Valuable Player in 1966, was presented with a plaque symbolic of the award in Baltimore, April 28, 1967. League President Joe Cronin presented the Kenesaw Mountain Landis award, named for the late baseball commissioner. Robinson is the first player ever to win the MVP balloting in both the National and American Leagues.(AP Photo)FILE – In this April 2, 2005, file photo, Washington Nationals manager Frank Robinson watches batting practice before a spring training game against the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, in St. Petersburg, Fla. Hall of Famer Frank Robinson, the first black manager in Major League Baseball and the only player to win the MVP award in both leagues, has died. He was 83.(AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)NextShow Caption1 of 23FILE – In this April 2, 2005, file photo, Washington Nationals manager Frank Robinson watches batting practice before a spring training game against the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, in St. Petersburg, Fla. Hall of Famer Frank Robinson, the first black manager in Major League Baseball and the only player to win the MVP award in both leagues, has died. He was 83.(AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)ExpandThe worst thing you can say about today’s major league baseball is that you can’t see Frank Robinson anywhere.The only exception is the Dodgers’ dugout. Dave Roberts will be the lone African-American manager in 2019.There have been 16. Robinson was the first, in 1975, and he was still a player, winding down a career of 586 home runs and Most Valuable Player awards in both leagues, the only man to do that.He got the job in Cleveland, amid some veterans who didn’t like his skin or what was underneath. Kuiper was in the on-deck circle when Robinson called out, “I”m going to pinch-hit for you.”“With who?” Kuiper replied, annoyed.“Me,” Robinson said.Hard to argue with that.Another time, Robinson called in Kuiper, a speedy infielder, and said, “You’re hitting the ball in the air too much.” Over the next 10 at-bats, he offered Kuiper $100 for each grounder he produced but demanded $100 back for each ball in the air.“And people wonder why I only hit one home run in my career,” said Kuiper, now the Giants’ TV play-by-play man.“He would try to intimidate you, but if you didn’t come back at him, he’d just dismiss you. He was always testing you. Once he told our pitchers to check out how many hitters were 35 years old, figure out who they were, and always pound them inside. If they didn’t, he’d fine them. But he also said there was one exception to that, and that was him. Sure enough, Fergie Jenkins came to town and tried to go inside and Frank buried one to left.”On Opening Day 1975, Robinson homered off New York’s Doc Medich to win. Rachel Robinson, Jackie’s widow, was on hand. “People here still talk about that game,” Manning said.Robinson was not a ceremonial hire. He saw the opportunity long before anyone else and prepared by managing the Santurce Crabbers in Puerto Rico for a couple of winters.His leadership was proven. When a loud rookie named Pete Rose beat out Don Blasingame for the second base job in 1963 and got ostracized by Blasingame’s buddies, Robinson and Vada Pinson basically adopted him.When Robinson thought the Orioles were overlooking the details, he put a mop on his head, called himself The Judge, and held a nightly postgame kangaroo court. Due process was not observed. Robinson cited every mistake, intentional or not, and imposed fines. Players needled each other and laughed. They also got better, and closer. In today’s 25-man, 25-phone clubhouses, you’re more likely to see a rhinoceros than a magistrate.Robinson was not the only one in the 60s who played with spikes up. He was just the best player who did.“He wanted you to go into second base hard,” said Kuiper, a former second baseman. “But he also expected you to stand there and take it.”Related Articles Robinson is still 10th all-time in home runs. In 1956 he homered 38 times with a league-leading 122 runs and was NL Rookie of the Year. In 1961 he slugged .611 and won his first MVP. Four times his OPS exceeded 1.000.Reds president Bill DeWitt considered Robinson “an old 30” and traded him to Baltimore in 1966 for pitcher Milt Pappas. Robinson thereupon won the Triple Crown and was MVP again, and the Orioles swept the Dodgers in the World Series.Robinson came to the Dodgers in 1972. Al Campanis handed him a booklet on The Dodger Way To Play Baseball. Robinson handed it back.“If I don’t know how to play by now I never will,” he said.He learned, and taught, the game by heart. Dodgers’ Will Smith: ‘I feel like it’s been five years’ since his 2019 debut Gaylord Perry said he didn’t want to be Robinson’s “slave” and aspired to make “one more dollar” than Robinson did. Perry was traded, but Robinson couldn’t get through 1977, with designated hitter Rico Carty leading the opposition.Robinson, who passed away Thursday at 83, was frequently asked about being the First Black Manager and he would shake his head. “I’ll be the First Black Manager fired,” he said.He got three other jobs, all with struggling clubs, and lost them, too.Sign up for Home Turf and get exclusive stories every SoCal sports fan must read, sent daily. Subscribe here.What mattered was a toughness that could arm-wrestle the doubts and slide hard into the prejudice. Robinson’s personality filled clubhouses, sometimes stadiums.“We came up in May, Duane Kuiper and I,” said Rick Manning, who still works the Indians’ radio broadcasts. “Dennis Eckersley, too. Frank was a tough guy, a little intimidating, but if you just did your job you were fine. Besides, we all grew up watching him play. He’d stand right there on the plate and dare you to hit him. What a great player he was.” Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros center_img Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros Harvard-Westlake alum Lucas Giolito throws no-hitter for White Sox Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Dustin May struck in head by line drive, Dodgers rally to avoid sweep in Arizona

first_img“We definitely felt adversity in this series and … it’s good to feel that every once in awhile. It was a humbling series for us. Now we can get back on track.”May felt more than adversity. He felt the impact of a Jake Lamb line drive that was measured a 91 mph off the bat. May underwent concussion testing and passed. He stood at his locker answering questions about the incident, claiming he didn’t even have a headache — an outcome that allowed teammate Ross Stripling to joke that May’s fluffy head of hair cushioned the impact.“I’m really kind of upset that I didn’t catch it because it grazed my glove,” May said. “It just pretty much grazed my glove but I think it slowed it down enough to not do too much damage. It hit off the band part of my hat so it was probably the best possibility I could look for. But it was really scary.“I saw it coming and I was, ‘Ohhhhh, get out of the way!’”The drive caught May in the side of the head behind and above his right ear. The ball caromed sharply into left field. The 21-year-old rookie dropped to the ground and lay there for a few minutes as a Dodgers trainer rushed out to check on him and May’s teammates gathered around. Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies May eventually stood up, put his hat back on and walked off the field with two members of the Dodgers’ training staff flanking him.“When it hit me at first it really just frightened me,” May said. “Then when I was on the ground, it was like, ‘Well, dang, I wish that wouldn’t have happened.’“Then I was like, I don’t want to rush it to get up because I’ve seen other people do that and it’s a worse outcome. So I figured I’d just stay down and see what happens, see what they say when they come out. … It still hasn’t really set in, that it hit me. We’ll see how it feels tomorrow.”Related Articles How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start PreviousLos Angeles Dodgers staring pitcher Ross Stripling throws against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the first inning of a baseball game Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Dustin May, left, is comforted by Dodgers’ David Freese, second from right, as manager Dave Roberts (30) runs on the field during the fourth inning of a baseball game, after May was hit by a batted ball from Arizona Diamondbacks’ Jake Lamb Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Dustin May rolls on the ground after being hit by a batted ball from Arizona Diamondbacks’ Jake Lamb during the fourth inning of a baseball game Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Dodgers medical staff Yosuke Nakajima, bottom left, attends to relief pitcher Dustin May, front, after May was hit by a batted ball from Arizona Diamondbacks’ Jake Lamb during the fourth inning of a baseball game Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Phoenix. Dodgers’ David Freese, left, Justin Turner (10), Chris Taylor (3), Dave Roberts (30) and Jedd Gyorko, right, all look on. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Dustin May, middle, walks off the field as he is flanked by medical staff Neil Rampe, left, and Yosuke Nakajima, right, after May was hit by a batted ball from Arizona Diamondbacks’ Jake Lamb during the fourth inning of a baseball game Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)Arizona Diamondbacks’ Jake Lamb, right, runs to first base after hitting Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Dustin May, left, with a batted ball during the fourth inning of a baseball game Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)Los Angeles Dodgers shortstop Chris Taylor (3) forces out Arizona Diamondbacks’ Nick Ahmed (13) before throwing to first base to complete a double play during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Russell Martin (55) celebrates his home run against the Arizona Diamondbacks with teammates Ross Stripling, center, and A.J. Pollock (11) during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)Arizona Diamondbacks right fielder Tim Locastro (16) watches a fan catch a home run by Los Angeles Dodgers’ Russell Martin during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)Los Angeles Dodgers second baseman Jedd Gyorko barehands a ground ball hit by Arizona Diamondbacks’ Tim Locastro during the fourth inning of a baseball game Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Phoenix. Locastro beat out an infield single on the play. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)Los Angeles Dodgers’ David Freese (25) celebrates his home run against the Arizona Diamondbacks with Dodgers’ Cody Bellinger during the first inning of a baseball game Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)Los Angeles Dodgers’ David Freese (25) celebrates his home run against the Arizona Diamondbacks with Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw, second from right, and Joc Pederson, right, during the first inning of a baseball game Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)Arizona Diamondbacks starting pitcher Alex Young, left, walks back on the mound after giving up a home run to Los Angeles Dodgers’ David Freese, right, during the first inning of a baseball game Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)Los Angeles Dodgers staring pitcher Ross Stripling throws against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the first inning of a baseball game Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Dustin May, left, is comforted by Dodgers’ David Freese, second from right, as manager Dave Roberts (30) runs on the field during the fourth inning of a baseball game, after May was hit by a batted ball from Arizona Diamondbacks’ Jake Lamb Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)NextShow Caption1 of 13Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Dustin May, left, is comforted by Dodgers’ David Freese, second from right, as manager Dave Roberts (30) runs on the field during the fourth inning of a baseball game, after May was hit by a batted ball from Arizona Diamondbacks’ Jake Lamb Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)ExpandPHOENIX — Pitching in relief has not gone well for Dustin May.Making his second relief appearance since being promoted from Triple-A a month ago, the Dodgers’ top pitching prospect took a line drive off the side of the head, knocking him from the game.The liner back to the mound was the fourth of five consecutive singles the Arizona Diamondbacks had in the fourth inning as they scored three times, erasing an early Dodgers lead for the fourth consecutive game. This time, the Dodgers rallied on home runs by Cody Bellinger in the ninth and Joc Pederson in the 11th to win 4-3 Sunday.“We definitely felt some adversity, losing three out of three to start the series,” Dodgers catcher Russell Martin said. “Then we had to dig deep all the way to the end. Belly with a huge home run then Pederson coming off the bench with an absolute moon shot.center_img Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season Lefty reliever Adam Kolarek replaced May and gave up the fifth consecutive single in the inning, allowing the go-ahead run to score.The Dodgers held multi-run leads early in each of the four games in Arizona – 3-0 the first three days and 2-0 on Sunday – but let them all get away.Sunday’s lead was built on solo home runs by David Freese and Martin. Freese’s homer came in his first at-bat since July 23 after being activated from the Injured List. Martin’s was the Dodgers’ 236th home run of the season, setting a new franchise record.Stripling handed that off to May in the fourth inning after pitching three scoreless innings in his return from the IL.In his first relief appearance on August 18 in Atlanta, May retired the first batter he faced then loaded the bases and gave up a grand slam.Against the Diamondbacks, he again retired the first batter and loaded the bases on three consecutive singles. That brought up Lamb who lined a 1-and-1 fastball back off May’s head. The ball ricocheted towards left field as two runs scored to tie the game. Josh Rojas singled off Kolarek to put the Diamondbacks in the lead.The Diamondbacks’ bullpen made their lead stand up into the ninth inning when manager Torey Lovullo chose to bring in lefty reliever Andrew Chafin to face Bellinger. Bellinger tied the game with his 43rd homer (tied for the major-league lead).Sixteen of those have come against left-handed pitching, the most for any batter in the majors this season. Bellinger also has the highest OPS for a left-handed batter against left-handed pitching.“He’s always hit left-handed pitching. Last year was certainly an aberration against lefties at times,” said Roberts who platooned Bellinger late last season. “He’s made the adjustments he’s needed to make. I feel very confident with him in the box against anyone.”Bellinger wore Pederson’s cleats Sunday — a superstition that has carried over for awhile now. For his part, Pederson took a bat given to him by Andre Ethier up to the plate against right-hander Taylor Clarke to lead off the 11th. The retired outfielder visited his old team Saturday.“He said it had a lot of hits in it,” Pederson said.It had one very big one. Pederson worked the count full then blasted the eighth pitch of the at-bat 454 feet into the right-field seats.Pedro Baez closed it out in the 11th for his first career save (in his 329th appearance), helping the Dodgers end a three-game losing streak and avoid a four-game sweep in Arizona.“It was as big of a hit for us as we’ve had all year considering obviously losing the first three here, where the pitching was at — you’re down to a couple arms at that point in time,” Roberts said of Pederson’s homer.“You have a four-game set and to come in here and lose four — there’s a lot of, I hate saying pressure, but it’s kind of a must-win situation as far as getting back on the winning track.” Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

More Dino Blood Found: Evolutionists in Denial

first_img“Can soft tissue survive 75 million years?” the caption in Science Magazine reads.No, it can’t. That’s why this cannot be original dinosaur soft tissue, some evolutionists are claiming in a news article in Science Magazine by Robert F. Service: “Signs of ancient cells and proteins found in dinosaur fossils.” Creationists have been proclaiming this evidence for a decade since Mary Schweitzer and Jack Horner found soft, stretchy tissue in a T. rex femur in 2005 (see 60 Minutes video), but evolutionists have either denied it, explained it away, or ignored it.  Can they ignore this news from America’s leading science journal?Because this was found in 8 bones tested, Service states that soft tissue in dinosaur bones may be common:The cupboards of the Natural History Museum in London hold spectacular dinosaur fossils, from 15-centimeter, serrated Tyrannosaurus rex teeth to a 4-meter-long hadrosaur tail. Now, researchers are reporting another spectacular find, buried in eight nondescript fossils from the same collection: what appear to be ancient red blood cells and fibers of ancient protein.Using new methods to peer deep inside fossils, the study in this week’s issue of Nature Communications backs up previous, controversial reports of such structures in dinosaur bones. It also suggests that soft tissue preservation may be more common than anyone had guessed. “It’s encouraging,” especially because the proteins were found in what appear to be the most unremarkable, ordinary bones, says Matthew Collins, an archaeologist and biochemist at the University of York in the United Kingdom. But he and others caution that the team hasn’t proven beyond doubt that the structures do contain ancient proteins.That’s right; they call it “encouraging,” as if paleontologists expected this or had not been denying it for a decade. This was the last thing evolutionists expected to find in bones thought tens of millions of years old.  “Proteins commonly decay hundreds to thousands of years after an organism dies, but in rare cases they have been known to survive up to 3 million years,” Service continues. That’s far short of the 75 million Darwin years needed to explain these new bones. Schweitzer found collagen in dinosaur bone previously, but others had not been able to replicate that find till now—and the results are shocking:What they found shocked them. Imaging the fresh-cut surfaces with scanning and transmission electron microscopes, “we didn’t see bone crystallites” as expected, Maidment says. “What we saw instead was soft tissue. It was completely unexpected. My initial response was these results are not real.”The U.K. team tested more fossils and ran microscopic samples from what appear to be collagen fibers through a mass spectrometer to get the weight of the component molecules. The weights came back as identical to those of the three most common amino acids in collagen, the team reports.The photo accompanying the article shows fibers that clearly look like collagen; they look nothing like pieces of rock or mineral. No DNA has been found yet, but co-discoverer Sarah Maidment is not ruling it out: “We haven’t found any in our fossils… however, I think it’s unwise to say we’ll never find any in [the] future” (BBC News). Sergio Bertazzo agrees: “It’s possible you could find fragments, but to find more than that? Who knows?” (The Guardian).Creationists are not shocked, because they believe dinosaurs died in the Flood just a few thousand years ago, like the Bible says. Secularists have treated that as mythology ever since Darwin and Lyell made it fashionable to think in terms of millions of years of earth history. Who has the empirical evidence now?  If the proteins are really from the dinosaur, it sets severe upper limits on the age of the material.Service doesn’t say anything else about the apparent “red blood cells” in the specimens. He ends with a sprinkle of doubt that the proteins are even real:But outsiders, including Schweitzer, say that the weights aren’t conclusive proof that the amino acids are real or that they came from a dinosaur rather than from bacteria or other contaminants. A different type of mass spectrometer that can provide the sequence of the amino acids in a protein fragment would strongly suggest the existence of collagen and replicate the earlier work, Collins says. Maidment says the team hopes to do such studies soon. If they succeed, the work may spur additional efforts to isolate dinosaur proteins and understand how they differed from those of their modern relatives.Service never again addresses the question, “Can soft tissue survive 75 million years?” No theory is presented about how it could last more than a few hundred thousand years, or 3 million at best. The two responses in this paragraph are: (1) deny it’s real, or (2) see what it can tell us about evolution. If that’s all, creationists are bound to celebrate this latest announcement (just one of a string of similar findings)  as a  “See? We told you so!” moment.The announcement comes just 3 days before “Jurassic World” hits the big screens around the world. The movie admits soft tissue exists, but claims that it can be preserved for millions of years by iron from hemoglobin in the dinosaur’s blood. This was a controversial claim by Mary Schweitzer in 2013 (11/16/13) that many other scientists find implausible (3/15/14).Correction: our initial post said that Service’s article was in Nature; it was in Science Magazine. The finding itself was reported in Nature Communications.Update 6/09/15: The news media are picking up on this story, suggesting it may get more traction this time around:Dinosaur blood cells extracted from 75-million-year-old fossil (New Scientist)Scientists out for dinosaur blood (PhysOrg)‘Blood cells’ found in dino fossils (BBC News)Found: preserved dinosaur cells – but sadly scientists still can’t build Jurassic World (Gareth Dyke in The Conversation)Dinosaur fossil investigation unlocks possible soft tissue treasure trove (Science Daily)Scientists See Signs of Dinosaur Blood in 75-Million-Year-Old Fossils (NBC News)75-million-year-old dinosaur blood and collagen discovered in fossil fragments (The Guardian)Paleontologists Discover Fossilized Dinosaur Blood (Popular Mechanics)How are reporters treating the obvious age implications? None of them mention creationists, the Bible, or the Flood. None of them even questions the Darwin ages of the bones. The attitude seems to be, “Well, what do you know; dinosaur blood can last for 75 million years. Let’s see what we can learn from it about evolution.”Perhaps the closest thing to skepticism is found in the last article: “the fossils contain some of their original biological proteins and amino acids—molecules that are thought to degrade completely after 4 million years,” the Popular Mechanics reporter says about statements by Susannah Maidment, the lead scientist at Imperial College London that published the findings. “‘This pushes that envelope back about 71 million years,” Maidment says. She adds that how or why these biological tissues managed to last for so long is a complete mystery. ‘We can only speculate, and there’s a lot of research that will be needed to explain how this sort of preservation has occurred.’” Her initial reaction is instructive: “”It was a total surprise,” Maidment says. “As a paleontologist my first thought was, ‘This is silly, there is absolutely no way this could be dinosaur blood’.”Update 6/09/15: The original paper in Nature Communications is open access, meaning everyone can read it and look at the evidence. The press release from Imperial College London is cautious: “potentially be red blood cells although the researchers caution that further evidence would be needed to confirm that the structures do not have another origin.” Maidment says, “Our study is helping us to see that preserved soft tissue may be more widespread in dinosaur fossils than we originally thought,” since their discoveries were made in “scrappy, poorly preserved fossils” instead of exceptionally-preserved ones. This suggests that a treasure trove of additional soft tissues are waiting to be uncovered. Mary Schweitzer, who made a splash with her soft tissue discovery in a T. rex a decade ago, calls it: “an exciting paper, particularly in showing what happens when you really look at ancient bone and are not bound by the expectation that ‘nothing could possibly persist’. If you don’t look, you won’t find. But if you do, you never know.” (BBC)Do you catch the importance of this?  It’s comparable to evolutionists stumbling upon the real Noah’s Ark. They cannot sustain the millions-of-years ages in light of this evidence. What will they do now?This will provide a highly visible test of evolutionists’ commitment to empiricism. If they continue to deny that this is evidence dinosaur bones are young, they deserve to get hammered. We’re seeing the leading edge of the toppling of evolutionists’ millions-of-years scheme, and with it, their whole theory of the history of the earth.  That’s too big a price for them to pay. If history is a guide, they will continue to be in a state of denial and carry on as if nothing happened. It’s up to the rest of us to get the word out.Creationists are also doing original research on this. Mark Armitage, who lost his job at California State University after publishing a paper on soft tissue in Triceratops horn that he found himself (11/05/14), is seeking funds to continue research. He posted a YouTube video responding to the Jurassic World claim. The osteocytes and cells he found in dinosaur bone never touch blood, he explains; therefore Schweitzer’s controversial explanation doesn’t work for bone cells (see ICR). If the bone cells are young, then the rest of the soft tissue cannot be millions of years old.(Visited 524 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享9last_img read more

Your Uber trip can help change lives

first_imgBefore, Uber would round down each passenger’s fare to the nearest rand. Now, with UberGiving, those cents are instead donated to good causes. (Image: Uber)South African non-profits are hailing the benefit of taxicab app Uber’s charitable giving. UberGiving allows the company and its passengers to donate to worthy causes.Before, Uber would round down each passenger’s fare to the nearest rand. Now, with UberGiving, those cents are instead donated to good causes. The new system does not cost the drivers, who will still earn 80% of each fare.The Reach for a Dream Foundation, which fulfils the dreams of children with life-threatening diseases, was the first beneficiary of Uber passengers’ generosity. It helped the foundation take passionate football fan Elihle Momoza, a 12-year-old with a blood disorder, to Moses Mabhida stadium for the first time. It also gave him a PlayStation with football games.UberGiving helped Faith Nifang, an eight-year-old with sickle cell anaemia, to live his special dream of a day at the beach by spending a weekend at Sun City, where he enjoyed the playground activities and the Valley of the Waves.“The magnitude of his smile said it all that day,” said Alon Lits, GM of Uber in sub-Saharan Africa.“We are honoured to be associated with Reach for a Dream, helping to assist children like Faith and Elihle. These are just some of the dreams that were made possible through UberGiving and the Reach for a Dream Foundation.”A great startUberGiving’s charitable drive has benefitted other non-profits as well. It helped the Tomorrow Trust, an educational NGO, to fund Mahlogonolo Pasha’s BSc studies in Life and Environmental Sciences at the University of Johannesburg.Pasha, from a family of five children raised by a single unemployed mother, dreams of becoming the first university graduate in her family. Education, she believes, will end their cycle of poverty.The Els for Autism Foundation is another UberGiving beneficiary. The charity was established in 2009 by golfer Ernie Els and his wife Liezl Els after their son Ben was diagnosed with severe autism.Their foundation funds an Autism Centre of Excellence, which gives under-resourced families of autistic children free access to evidence-based interventions.Other non-profits that have benefited from UberGiving include the Blow the Whistle initiative and the Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation.“We are proud to support these organisations, to help them continue the good work they do,” said Lits. “A special thanks goes out to all those riders using the Uber platform, by simply requesting a trip each of you are making a difference, and every little bit counts.”For more information, visit www.uber.com or connect with them on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Cinematography Guide: The Effective Use of the Close-Up

first_imgClose-ups have a range of uses, from comedy to horror, but as a general rule, you should use them sparingly. Here are a few reasons why.The close-up is one of the most common tools in visual storytelling, and when used correctly, it is very powerful. It allows the filmmaker to connect the audience with the subject on a deeper emotional level. But if you overuse it, the effect wears off quickly, and the film feels claustrophobic and cramped. Let’s take a look at few situations when you should, and when you shouldn’t, use a close-up.Emotional ContagionIn “Catching Characters’ Emotions,” Amy Coplan discusses the involuntary psychological response known as “emotional contagion,” wherein a person will mimic and (to a degree) feel the emotions of the people around them — or in this case, the characters in a film. Coplan uses the opening scene of Saving Private Ryan to make her point. At the beginning of the film, we do not know the characters’ back stories or personalities or motivations. But through the strategic use of close-ups, Spielberg connects the audience to these characters on an emotional level.The initial close-ups cause us to “catch” emotions, so as the rest of the scene plays out, we’re already invested in the characters’ well-being. Coplan writes, “Emotional contagion is not a deliberate or intellectual process but one that takes place involuntarily and unconsciously.” This is the power of the close-up. Regardless of the viewer’s immersion into the plot and suspension of disbelief, if the viewer is watching, chances are that, at the very least, a close-up with a powerful emotional performance will draw them in.Emotional EnduranceA thought, then, might be to use the close-up as much as possible in order to draw in and maintain the audience’s emotional attention. However, there are inherent flaws with this approach. First of all, we can only experience emotions for so long before we become mentally and physically worn out. Yes, moods last for a long period of time, but the initial experience of an emotion is brief. By the time we get to the close-up that matters, they all feel just the same.Check out this short film, “Uisce Beatha,” about an Irishman who misses his boat (the Titanic) to emigrate to America.The film is almost entirely shot using close-ups. Aside from making everything feel cramped and uncomfortable, the close-up loses its effect. There is no differentiation between a close-up during our protagonist’s regular conversations and one wherein his father is weeping. After so much emotional contagion, we’re emotionally fatigued. By the time we’re supposed to be moved by a crying father, we’re spent!The notion is similar to the jump scare. If a horror film relies only on jump scares, then most of us will eventually stop caring, and each subsequent scare will be predictable and ineffective. Watch this scene from The Haunting. Not only does it use the close-up effectively, it’s also a good use of the jump scare.The proper use of the close-up intensifies the jump scare. As our characters come together and begin to move back down the staircase, the camera pulls out to wider shots, allowing us to relax from the tension for a moment. Then, suddenly, we jump back into a close-up as the doctor’s wife emerges from a trap door, practically shoving her terrified expression into our faces. This dramatic change of composition is unsettling, and it is made even more powerful by the emotional contagion that occurs as we witness the look of horror.ContextStorytelling relies on context. The twist at the end of The Sixth Sense has little power without the entire film that precedes it. Coplan writes, “Emotional contagion leads to a synchrony between individuals, but this synchrony is not sufficient for understanding.”Out of context, the close-up will only elicit the experience of an emotion, not an understanding of it. If the opening scene of Saving Private Ryan were only close-ups of worried faces, than that’s all we would feel: worry. When the camera pulls out to show the battle taking place, we receive context for these emotions and are then able to actually relate to and grow with each character — as opposed to simply mimicking the characters’ emotions.When possible, the close-up should emphasize emotions and thoughts within a grander context. In Superbad, we see a close-up used exactly that way.For most of the scene, we see mid shots and wides of the characters in their environments and how they interact with each other. We only cut in to close-ups to emphasize the characters’ anger, disbelief, and fear. This uses the close-up as a tool for emphasis.Body LanguageMuch of our interpersonal communication relies on body language. Body language not only emotionally emphasizes words and ideas, it also conveys important characteristics of the subjects on-screen. The way characters move and comport themselves is critical to understanding who they are. Obviously, then, shooting too many close-ups hinders viewers’ ability to read characters’ body language.Compare these two scenes and how each one handles the close-up.CyrusCasino RoyaleThe performances in both are very well done, but in Casino Royale, we see more mid and wide shots of the conversation. This gives us a better view of these two characters moving about in space (even the limited space of a dinner table) — it also helps us step back from their faces. In Cyrus, we are crammed up against John C. Reilly and Jonah Hill’s faces for the entirety of their conversation. This creates a sense that these two characters are practically motionless beings.The Close-Up for EmphasisWith today’s smaller screens, it’s easy to fall into a habit of shooting mostly close-ups. A face filling a phone or television screen for most of an hour isn’t as obnoxious as one that fills a theater screen. But regardless of the size of the screen, the close-up is a powerful tool that requires moderation.As with all art, however, “rules” are really just guidance. This is not to say that close-ups can only be and are only effective in specific emotional moments. But the new filmmaker should approach the close-up with a certain degree of respect. Unless there is a thematic or narrative reason to shoot mostly close-ups (i.e., creating a sense of claustrophobia, paranoia, etc.), avoid falling into the habit of shooting entire sequences (or films, for that matter) in only close-ups. Use them sparingly.The close-up is an intimate moment, a look into a character’s mind. Find the moments when its use would create the most impact.Cover image via Casino Royale (Sony Pictures Releasing).Looking for more articles on film and video production? Check these out.Back to Basics: Mastering Wide and Close-up ShotsHow to Design a Close-Up Shot — And When You Should Use ItHow to Organically Incorporate Close-Ups Into Your EditHow to Shoot Close-Up Shots Like Sergio LeoneCinematography Tip: How the Pros Frame a Close-Uplast_img read more

3 taken for child-lifters thrashed in U.P.; victims rescued by police

first_imgThree persons were thrashed on suspicion of child-lifting in separate incidents in parts of Uttar Pradesh, the police said on Tuesday. In one of the incidents at Bahraich village, an irate mob thrashed a 25-year-old man, tried to take him hostage and hurled bricks at a police party that had gone to rescue the victim following rumours of child-lifting. The incident took place at Jamvapur village under the Ramgaon police station on Monday night when Balak Ram in an inebriated condition lost his way to his house in the adjoining village and was taken for a child-lifter, SP Gaurav Grover said. The police team reached the spot and rescued the man. When the police party was returning after rescuing him, the mob hurled bricks at it, Mr. Grover said, adding that they also tried to capture the victim. Three policemen, including a sub-inspector, were injured, the officer said. An attempt was also made to spread rumours linking the incident with child-lifting through social media on Monday night and Tuesday morning but the police found no truth in it following an inquiry. A case had been registered under Section 151 of the IPC and 21 people have been arrested so far while efforts are on to identify others in the video of the incident, the SP said. In two other incidents in the Gopiganj police station area of Bhadohi on Tuesday, two people were thrashed. In the first incident, labourer Shiv Kumar Yadav was beaten up at Beraspur village and was handed over to the police, SP Ram Badan Singh said. In a similar incident, one Babbu Singh was beaten up at Sarai Jagdish when he tried to drag a seven-year-old-girl, Mr. Singh said. The police, which immediately rushed to the spot, managed to rescue Babbu Singh, who was admitted to a hospital for treatment. The SP said Shiv Kumar was a labourer, who was going towards another village, while Babbu Singh was of unsound mind. The officer has appealed to people not to pay any heed to rumours and hand over any suspicious person to police, instead of taking the law in their hands.last_img read more

Tired realty market offers schemes to lure buyers

first_imgAs home sales have dropped in the national capital region (NCR), developers are coming up with schemes that offer relief to customers from paying their equated monthly installments (EMIs) till they get possession of their flats.’EMI sharing’ or ‘No EMI till possession’ is a concept where home-loan borrowers do not have to pay the EMI until they get occupancy of their flat.It saves the buyers from the double trouble of paying both home rent and the EMI on their home loans.More than a dozen developers, including Ansals and Jaypee, are offering such schemes on their various projects in the NCR. Ansals are offering the ‘No EMI’ scheme on its Mulberry Floors luxury flats in sector 67 Gurgaon. Similarly, Jaypee Greens is offering EMI relaxation for two years for their Personal Suites at Sports City. For their Krescent Homes project in Noida, Jaypee is offering the scheme EMI relaxation scheme for 30 months.Customers are asked to pay between 10 per cent and 20 per cent of the home price at the time of booking.The concept is not new. Many developers in Mumbai and Pune are already implementing it. It is only that the concept is getting popular among developers in the NCR only now.Developers say that it is a winwin situation for both buyers and developers.According to Mohit Arora, director, Supertech Ltd, “The customers benefit from a lower size of upfront investment, minimum risk of delay in possession, appreciation in value of the flat booked and no double burden of paying EMI and rent. This scheme provides ample time to the customers to manage their finances.” On the other hand, it helps developers to sell the project without the need to lower the prices of the property and, thus, ensure regular fund flows that can be used for construction purposes.”It helps boost the sales as it attracts those buyers who are not able to afford both rent and EMI on loans. Also, it attracts the investors as they benefit from the difference in the prevailing home loan rates and the future rates,” Honey Katiyal, chief executive officer (CEO), Investors Clinic, said.However, property experts feel that such schemes are the sign of a sagging realty market.Pankaj Kapoor, managing director of Liases Foras, a real estate research agency said that these promotional concepts are the indication that a correction in prices is at hand.”Generally these promotional schemes are among the last things developers do while holding on to current prices. If the scheme fails to generate good response, then they end up offering huge discounts, which leads the property market to correct,” Kapoor said.For brokers the big worry now is that even these schemes are not attracting enough buyers.”Earlier Jaypee was offering 24 months EMI relaxation for the Krescent Homes and when it failed to generate the required response they extended it to 30 months. Still the response is not so good,” an executive from Axiom Properties told MAIL TODAY .Courtesy: Mail Today advertisementlast_img read more