Limerick on alert as city hit by Covid outbreaks

first_imgGovernment announces phased easing of public health restrictions hand sanitiserAs the government announced tighter restrictions on communities after a spike in Coronavirus cases, Limerick was dealing with further outbreaks of the deadly virus.The Limerick Post can reveal that University Hospital Limerick (UHL), Hanratty’s Direct Provision Centre and St Patrick’s GAA Club are the latest to be hit by Covid-19.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up As UHL announced measures to tackle an outbreak of the virus on one of its medical wards, the HSE confirmed it was in the process of managing another Covid-19 cluster at a direct provision centre in the city.The HSE told the Limerick Post that a letter sent to residents at Hanratty’s Hostel was “a standard letter that we use when there is a number of cases in a congregated setting”.Management at the centre, located on Glentworth Street, which had 212 residents on the books, declined to comment.St Patrick’s GAA Club, meanwhile, joined a growing list of local sports clubs who had announced they were testing or had players test positive for Covid-19, including Claughaun, Ahane and Cratloe GAA clubs as well as Shannon, Old Crescent and Munster Rugby.On Wednesday morning, St Patrick’s confirmed that “a player from an adult group, who trained with others in an outdoor setting” had contracted the virus.The player is considered low/casual risk and the club is working with the HSE and the Limerick County Board to deal with the issue.An outbreak control team was established at UHL after two Covid-19 cases, involving a patient and a staff member, were confirmed on Tuesday.Staff who have been identified as contacts were asked to self-isolate while further testing and contact tracing continued.Meanwhile, in what was a first for fee-paying Glenstal Abbey School, international pupils were welcomed into a period of self-isolation in Murroe, ahead of the start of the new school term.“The first of our students from outside Ireland have been arriving over the weekend, to spend their 14-day period of restricted movement here in Glenstal. It is great to see students back in our school at last! #iloveboarding #growatglenstal,” Glenstal tweeted. Advertisement Covid antibody testing opens to public at Shannon Airport Linkedin Mass COVID testing to take place at University of Limerick following fresh outbreak of virus among student population Previous articleProtobaby’s Twisted Words – new single and album on the wayNext articleLimerick Post Show | Singer songwriter Dáwna David Raleigh RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Email NewsLimerick on alert as city hit by Covid outbreaksBy David Raleigh – August 20, 2020 2091 center_img WhatsApp Twitter Limerick Post Show | Careers & Health Sciences Event for TY Students Facebook Limerick health chiefs urge public not to withhold information on virus contacts, as they investigate “complex and serious outbreaks” across midwest region Institute of Public Health addresses loneliness as a challenge to national health in light of Covid-19 restrictions Print TAGSCoronavirusCovid 19healthIrelandLimerick City and CountyNationalNews last_img read more

New genetic links for Crohn’s, colitis

first_imgCrohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) — inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract — have puzzled the scientific community for decades. Ten years ago, researchers recognized that both genes and environment contributed to these diseases but knew little about precisely how and why illness occurred.Today, researchers from across the CD and UC communities have come together to share raw data as well as newly collected genetic information to dissect the biology of a group of conditions that affect millions of people worldwide. Their research centers on the two diseases, which are collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and suggests a fundamental connection between risk of IBD and genes involved in other immune-related diseases and the immune system’s response to pathogens. The work by researchers from the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Yale School of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and dozens of other organizations appears in a Nature paper this week.“This study marks the first time we’ve acquired and combined the raw data from so many research studies around the world and also the first time we’ve jointly analyzed Crohn’s with ulcerative colitis,” said Mark Daly, one of the senior authors of the work and senior associate member of the Broad Institute and co-director of its Program in Medical and Population Genetics. Daly is also chief of the Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit at MGH and an associate professor at Harvard Medical School (HMS). “We’ve been able, with this study, to evaluate the evidence for both diseases simultaneously, and discovered that the majority of genetic risk factors are associated with both diseases.”“There’s been a paradigm shift in our understanding of IBD. This gene discovery process offers an opportunity to begin identifying new targets for treatment, better diagnostic tools, and, in the long term, personalized care for patients,” said co-author HMS Associate Professor of Medicine Ramnik Xavier, a senior associate member of the Broad Institute, and chief of gastroenterology and director of the Center for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease at MGH. “We now have the necessary starting material to understand the pathways that contribute to Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, and we also have a framework to better appreciate that they may not be two distinct diseases, but rather collections of many different diseases.”Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis have much in common: Both cause many of the same gastrointestinal symptoms and both are marked by an improper response by the body’s immune system to harmless cells or bacteria.  Over the past 10 years, researchers have performed genomewide association studies, looking across the genomes of thousands of patients with either CD or UC and comparing them with genomes from people who do not have these diseases to find significant genetic differences. The new study not only brings together the original data from those previous analyses, but also adds genetic information from another 40,000 people either with or without a form of IBD.“If we want to get more hits but also dissect the differences between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis or understand the commonalities, we really need to share all of our genetic data,” said co-first author Stephan Ripke, a researcher at the Broad Institute and MGH. Ripke worked closely with co-first author Luke Jostins of the Sanger Institute to combine and then analyze genetic information collected by researchers from many different institutions.The new study identified 71 additional genetic associations for IBD, many of which have been previously implicated in other immune-related disorders, including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriasis. The new research also suggests a strong overlap between IBD susceptibility genes and genes tied to the immune system’s response to mycobacterial infections, including tuberculosis and leprosy. Researchers have observed similarities between the immune response in CD and that seen in tuberculosis, and they hypothesize that CD could be an aberrant response to certain harmless organisms present in the gut that trigger a similar reaction.In addition to drawing upon original data from previous studies, the work utilizes a relatively new tool known as the immunochip, which samples 200,000 sites in the genome previously tied to autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.“As a research community, we designed this array to target genes involved in immune-mediated diseases of all kinds,” said Daly. “This is one of our first studies using the immunochip, and there are many more results that will emerge from these studies — within IBD and across immune diseases.”At the Broad Institute, researchers are already pursuing some of the pathways identified in previous studies of UC and CD, including autophagy, a process in which infected cells eat themselves to combat microbes.“This work gives us additional leads to pursue,” said Xavier. “It gives us an opportunity for high-quality, translational research, allowing us to identify core pathways involved in IBD and better understand how genes interact with each other and with the environment, illuminating new pathways that contribute to disease.”last_img read more

CBSE Basketball meet kicks off at Miles Bronson Residential School, Borjhar

first_imgOur Sports ReporterGuwahati: The CBSE Cluster-1 (East Zone) Under 17 & 19 Boys and Girls Basketball Tournament 2018-19, kicked off today at Miles Bronson Residential School (MBRS), Borjhar.The inauguration ceremony of the tournament was graced by P. I. Sabu, Regional Director, CBSE, Guwahati as the Chief Guest.A total of 30 CBSE schools encompassing the NE, including the host MBRS have participated in the tournament out of which 19 are U-19 boys and 12 are U-19 girls teams. However in U-17 Boys and Girls categories, there are 15 and 13 teams respectively.Dr. N. K. Dutta, the Founder and Principal of the host school MBRS, extended a warm welcome to all the participating CBSE schools encompassing the entire NE region to MBRS.The Chief Guest P. I. Sabu, Regional Director, CBSE, Guwahati in his address extended greetings and good-luck to all the participants and made a clarion call to all to maintain a congenial atmosphere throughout the tournament and to build a splendid camaraderie to fulfil the real cause of organizing this Cluster matches. Sabu also declared the opening of the tournament.last_img read more

Nadal survives scare at Australian Open

first_imgThe big shock saw 6th seed Dominika Cibulkova lose to 30th seed, Ekatarina Makarova. There were also third round wins earlier for Dominic Thiem, David Goffin, Milos Ronic and Gael Monfils.In the women’s singles, Serena Williams had no trouble against Nicole Gibbs, beating her in straight sets.Caroline Wozniacki was knocked out in straight sets by Joanna Konta.last_img

Senior Living: longest day fundraiser

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisAlpena, Mich. — June is Alzheimer’s and brain awareness month, so the Alpena Senior Center has created a unique fundraiser to help those battling the disease.The center wants to paint the town purple with rocks on June 21st. The 21st is the longest day of the year, so folks will be able to paint rocks the color of the forget–me–not flower, a symbol of the disease. Tracy Niedzwiecki works at the senior center and knows how important these fundraisers for those battling the diseases.“I personally have lost a grandmother who has had Alzheimer’s, a great grandmother, and right now in my own family, I have an aunt that suffers from Alzheimer’s so, it’s very important to me to bring awareness,” said Niedzwiecki.Once all of the rocks have been painted, the rocks will be scatted throughout the community. If you find a rock, you can bring back to the center for a small prize. Donations support the Alzheimer’s Awareness Foundation and the senior center’s early onset Alzheimer’s group. Donation suggestions are $5.There will also be a bake sale on the 21st. For more information, contact the Alpena Senior Citizen Center.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThis Tags: Alpena Senior Center, Alpena Senior Citizen Center, Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s Awareness Foundation, Brain, Forget-Me-Not Flowers, FundraiserContinue ReadingPrevious Peters introduces legislation to crack down on Chinese fentanylNext Photo of the Day for Thursday, June 6last_img read more