England squad named for French U21 championship

first_img England Golf is sending a squad of six players to the French Lady Junior Championship at St Cloud, near Paris, from April 17-21. They are: Gabriella Cowley, Annabel Dimmock, Alex Peters, Sophie Keech, Sammy Fuller and Sophie Lamb. This U21 championship is one of the most prestigious in Europe and always attracts a strong field of leading players, whose places in the tournament are determined by their position in the World Amateur Golf Ranking. The full field will play two rounds of stroke play qualifying before the leading 32 players go forward to the match play stages of the Esmond Trophy. The next best 16 players aged under 18 will contest the Cartier Trophy which was won last year by England’s Bronte Law. The players: Gabriella Cowley, 18 (Hanbury Manor, Hertfordshire, image © Leaderboard Photography) was runner-up in this year’s Portuguese amateur championship. She won the England Golf girls’ order of merit for 2013, a year when her achievements included qualifying for the Women’s British Open, winning the Critchley Salver and helping England to retain their crown at the Girls’ Home Internationals. Annabel Dimmock, 17, (Wentworth, Surrey) won the 2014 Jones-Doherty Cup during a successful trip to the USA for the Orange Blossom Tour, where she was also runner-up in the South Atlantic women’s amateur. She has followed up by becoming runner-up in the Spanish women’s amateur, taking fifth individual place in the European Nations Cup and, with Steven Brown, winning the Sunningdale Foursomes. Alex Peters, 20, (Notts Ladies’, Nottinghamshire) won the 2013 England Golf women’s order of merit, sponsored by Lorrin Golf. During the year she was runner-up in the English amateur and Welsh stroke play championships and, like Gabriella Cowley, represented GB&I in the Vagliano Trophy against the Continent of Europe. She reached the quarter finals of this year’s Spanish amateur. Sophie Keech, 17, (Parkstone, Dorset) won the 2013 English girls’ championship, to add to her English schools’ and South West girls’ titles. She was a member of England’s winning team at the Girls’ Home Internationals. This year she received England Golf’s Silver Tee award for the way she combines her golf and her studies. Sammy Fuller, 14, (Roehampton, Surrey) was in England’s winning team at the Girls’ Home Internationals and represented GB&I in the Junior Vagliano Trophy. She had top-ten finishes in the 2013 women’s Welsh Open, Irish Open and English Close Championships, she won the Bridget Jackson Bowl and was third on the Lorrin Golf England girls’ Order of Merit. Sophie Lamb, 16, (Clitheroe, Lancashire) was leading points scorer in England’s winning team at the Girls’ Home Internationals, won the girls’ championship at the 2013 Fairhaven Trophies and represented GB&I in the junior Vagliano Trophy. She also helped England beat Spain in the annual U16 international. 31 Mar 2014 England squad named for French U21 championship last_img read more

Obama to Ali: ‘You shocked the world’

first_imgSTAR STUDDED GALA—Actress Rasheda Ali, daughter of boxing legend Muhammad Ali arrives at the Keep Memory Alive 16th Annual “Power of Love Gala” honoring Muhammad Ali with his 70th birthday celebration Feb. 18, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Jeff Bottari) by Oskar GarciaLAS VEGAS (AP)—President Barack Obama lauded Muhammad Ali Saturday as he joined some of the world’s most famous people in a birthday celebration for the boxer known simply as “The Greatest.”“Happy birthday, champ,” President Barack Obama told Ali through a video message, saying he wished he could have attended a swanky dinner gala in Las Vegas featuring some of the biggest names in sports, film, television and music. “As a fighter, you were something spectacular,” Obama told Ali, who turned 70 last month. “You shocked the world, and you inspired it, too. And even after all the titles and legendary bouts, you’re still doing it.”The gala’s 2,000 attendees were there to celebrate Ali’s life and generate millions of dollars for brain research, a mission Ali’s family says is important to him in part because of his nearly 30-year battle with Parkinson’s disease.Football great Jim Brown said Ali represents the greatest of America, because at one time people only recognized his athletic ability and didn’t like what he had to say. That changed over time, he said.“America started with slavery and ended up with a Black president,” Brown said. “Muhammad Ali was a part of that … a big part.”Ali’s wife, Lonnie Ali, told the star-studded crowd that her husband’s greatest wish has always been to inspire and help others. She said he feels that his life really began when he retired from the ring.“Muhammad’s gift of inspiration is timeless, and now more relevant than ever,” she said after being introduced by music icon Quincy Jones.Lonnie Ali introduced a video montage of her husband’s life, including clips from his work with children.“People look for miracles, people look for wonders, people expect surprises of all kinds,” Ali said in the video. “Yet the greatest wonder, the greatest miracle, the greatest surprise is to be found in one’s heart.”Guests arriving on the red carpet included football great Franco Harris, supermodel Cindy Crawford, acting star Samuel L. Jackson, Ali’s children and grandchildren and Chuck Wepner, who fought Ali in 1975 for the heavyweight title and lost.“I would go anywhere in the world for Muhammad Ali’s birthday,” Wepner said.One of Ali’s daughters, Rasheda Ali, said the gala is a chance for friends, family and A-listers who look up to her father to show their respect for his life and legacy as a humanitarian. In return, she says he’ll be honored to see them there.“He has not left that need to help others,” Rasheda Ali said. “That’s one of his core values—his charity and his giving.”The gala—with tickets starting at $1,500 per plate—was held at the MGM Grand, the site of most of boxing’s major fights the past two decades. Famous faces converged on the 160 tables adjacent to two rings and a stage—Terrence Howard, Anthony Hopkins, Manny Pacquiao, and Lenny Kravitz, among others. They planned performances and tributes to a fighter who went 56-5 in the ring with 37 knockouts and became perhaps the most famous athlete ever because of his personality and willingness to publicly stand up for his beliefs.Tennis great Andre Agassi said Ali has shown the world that each person has a duty—regardless of their occupation—to live for more than him or herself and help others.“What he did with his platform was unparalleled and the impact he’s had as a result, we still feel to this day, which is why we’re all out here tonight,” Agassi said. “We’re grateful to what he’s done. He’s been a leader—we’re also challenged and charged with a duty of figuring out a way to do more.”Ali has lived with Parkinson’s disease for nearly 30 years, a degenerative brain condition that some doctors say can be brought on by punches to the head.The gala raised funds for the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health and the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Ky., a cultural attraction that celebrates Ali’s life and pushes educational goals on a wide range of topics for adults and children.Larry Ruvo, chairman of the clinic’s fundraising arm, Keep Memory Alive, said he’s not sure whether the fundraiser will exceed its record of $27 million, but he hopes so.The gala’s auction includes some items that only an A-lister or others with incredibly deep pockets could possibly afford. The top item was Ali’s gloves that he used to fight Floyd Patterson in 1965, a bout he won by knockout in the 12th round.“If it’s $100, great, $100,000 would be better,” Larry King said in trying to drum up bids.Magician David Copperfield auctioned off a four-night trip to his set of 11 private islands in the Bahamas for $300,000.Boxing promoter Bob Arum said during a pre-gala reception Friday night attended by celebrities including Hopkins and Larry King that Ali will go down as one of the most important Americans in history.“Without Muhammad Ali, there wouldn’t have been an Obama,” he said. “There wouldn’t have been a mixed-race president.”ABC and ESPN plan to air the gala on Feb. 25.last_img read more

Endless Adventure in Crescent Valley plays host to fun-filled weekend

first_imgReally, it’s the start of summer.And the folks at Kootenays — Borderline Boaters are stoked to be presenting this year’s Kootenay Whitewater Festival this weekend on the Slocan River near Crescent Valley.The event, hosted at Endless Adventure, starts off with some meet and greet at the Endless Adventure campground and leads up to some exciting paddling Saturday and Sunday.This is an intermediate paddle fest with a variety of clinics for all skill levels, including beginners.The weekend starts off with a river run and clinics, followed by lunch, land games and more paddling in the afternoon. Dinner on your own then back in action for The Evening Entertainment — opening act Roy Has Fire, featuring Almanak and Wrapping up the evening with DJ ELF . Pilates Sunday morning with Live It Up Fitness, then a river run, Team Ball Race and Boater Cross for the rest of the afternoon. Finishing the weekend off with prizes and give-aways.Guided river runs on the some of the West Kootenays classics.The Kootenay Whitewater Festival is for intermediate paddler and the clinics are available for those that want to brush up on their skills. Endless Adventure is hosting a Playboating clinic on Saturday, a Creaking clinic on Sunday, and the Basic skills and rolling clinic both days. The clinic are an additional $30 each.Early registration is before Thursday for a discount of $10 at Endless Adventure, or register at Endless Adventure on Saturday  $60 for the weekend which includes lunch both days, T-shirt, prize, Party, camping.Registration and sign up goes from 8:15 to 9 a.m.! For more info about the festival or other events, feel free to call Endless Adventure at 1-877-FUN-8181 or email [email protected] [email protected]last_img read more

Crime lit in SA – a new phenomenon

first_imgMike Nicol’s crime novel Killer Country has received positive reviews.(Image: Mike Nicol)South Africans like to talk about crime. It creeps into conversations at dinner parties, in shebeens, on radio talk shows and in parliament.Perhaps it was only a matter of time, then, until all that talking fostered creative writing and reading – not just in newspaper and magazine articles or online, but in books. South Africa’s publishers, booksellers and literary communities are all in a stir over “crime lit”.Literary websites like Book SA and LitNet are dedicating an increasing proportion of their content to so-called krimis. Earlier this year, literary journal WordsEtc brought out a special issue on the phenomenon, guest edited by Joanne Hichens, herself a crime writer. The publication featured interviews with, among others, the local queen of crime fiction, Margie Orford.Most recently, the inaugural BookEx book fair in Johannesburg hosted CrimeWrite, the first festival of its kind in the country. Organiser Mike Nicol expressed some disappointment at the turnout, but affirmed nonetheless that the writers participating showed “they can deliver the goods … there is a great marketing opportunity here.”“Pulp fiction with hardboiled prose”Nicol, a self-confessed krimihead, is the doyen of the South African crime writing scene and its most ardent promoter. This is quite something for a man who used to feel only disdain for the genre.He describes his crime novels as “pulp fiction with hardboiled prose”, and is unashamed about the formulaic requirements of much popular writing – in particular, he is critical of “academics who haven’t yet got their heads around the idea that commercial fiction has a completely legitimate place in any society’s literary life”.In penning these words, Nicol no doubt had in mind a review of his book Killer Country by literary scholar Leon de Kock of Stellenbosch University. The debate amongst members of the Book SA community following this review demonstrated the false perception that professional academics look down from their ivory towers on popular books, their readers and their writers.De Kock’s review in fact praises Nicol’s writing, but poses some important questions nonetheless: what does it mean for a former writer of serious literary works to turn his hand to genre fiction? Is this a process of dumbing-down in order to gain as wide a readership as possible? And if so, what assumptions are being made about readers? More specifically, why is it that so many writers have, like Nicol, chosen to focus their careers on crime writing?These are important questions, particularly in a country such as South Africa. There are ethical implications to representing the phenomenon of crime in the pages of a book – not least because writing for entertainment and writing for edification are by no means mutually inclusive.This dilemma is linked to the problem of definition. What is crime writing? After all, you would be hard pressed to identify any South African book (including those by our Nobel Prize-winners) in which transgression of the law is not a central theme. As such, crime has always been pervasive in South African literature.A useful distinction can, however, be made between fiction and non-fiction crime writing. One of the panel discussions at the CrimeWrite festival included well-known non-fiction authors Peter Harris, Antony Altbeker, Martin Welz and Chris Marnewick – all of whom have written about true crime in earnest engagements with South Africa’s crime epidemic. For the most part, however, when people refer to crime writing they mean what Nicol himself calls “schlock fiction”. This is, more or less, writing according to a set of conventions already established by authors from countries where crime is not as serious a social problem as it is here.Vicarious gratificationThose who defend crime fiction in South Africa could present a moral case if they wished to: in a country where, all too often, justice does not take its course, krimis offer a kind of vicarious gratification. As Nicol admits, crime novels tend to conclude with the triumph of moral justice, if not of the justice system: they appeal to a reader’s “innate desire to have good stomp all over evil”.But it’s not that simple. Many crime novels, in true realist form, reject neat endings in which the goodies beat the baddies; moreover, it’s not always that easy to tell the good guys from the bad guys.“One of the things that attracted me to crime fiction,” adds Nicol, “is the moral ambiguity it creates. There are no angels.”Likewise, crime writers do not claim any moral high ground for themselves. That WordsEtc cover image of Margie Orford is suitably ambiguous: looking sombre as she pulls on a white glove, Orford could either be a detective about to get to work or a murderer about to commit a heinous crime.Quoting Raymond Chandler’s observation that “crime fiction is a parody of itself, as tongue-in-cheek as it gets”, Nicol suggests that krimis mock “the author, the novel and the reader. It’s a game. Crime fiction confronts serious social issues but simultaneously says, don’t take me seriously.”An entertaining reading experienceIndeed, there seems to be consensus among South Africa’s crime writers that their vocation is fun – just as they want the reading experience to be entertaining. Yet the awkward question remains: what happens when writing and reading pleasure involves voyeuristic violence? There are no clear answers.A glance at the promotion tables in local book retailers provides evidence enough that South African readers are not reluctant to buy crime fiction from international authors such as Stieg Larsson and Ruth Rendell. This would suggest that most consumers see krimis as a form of escapism, which may be one reason why they avoid locally-produced crime lit: it is simply too close to the bone.But the major reason is, unfortunately, that South Africans are generally still hesitant to spend their time and money on works by South African authors.As Nicol laments, “Often we need to be ratified by overseas publication before local readers will buy our books.”This trend is slowly being reversed, and more and more South African books are on the shelves. If South African crime writing does prove to be as popular as is hoped by local practitioners of the craft – from veterans such as Deon Meyer and Wessel Ebersohn to newcomers like Sara Lotz and Sifiso Mzobe – then it may well help to grow a reading culture across the country.The last word can be left to Nicol: “It’s not so much a matter of dumbing-down as a new kind of book being written. The high literature will remain but readers now have more choice when it comes to buying local fiction. The trick is to make them aware of that choice.”last_img read more

Final year for fertilizer applicator certification

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest We are now into our third and final year for fertilizer applicator certification for those applying fertilizer to 50 acres or more. Ohio State University Extension will be busy with meetings for Fertilizer Certification again this coming winter months, also known as meeting season. In 2014 and with further extensions in 2015, legislators have imposed new regulations on nutrient applications in Ohio. We just learned that the Ohio Department of Agriculture has certified more than 11,000 applicators in Ohio, with maybe another 6,000 to 8,000 to go before the September 30, 2017 deadline.Training programs for the certification are provided by the Ohio State University.To find meeting plans for your area of Ohio, go to: http://nutrienteducation.osu.edu. Information is also there to understand who needs the certification, and where to sign up for and attend meetings.If you have a Pesticide Applicators license, then likely you will also need to be certified for fertilizer application; over the next winter as you re-certify for your pesticide license you can also choose to be fertilizer applicator certified at a two-hour meeting. If this is your year for pesticide license re-certification then you can find those meeting locations here: http://pested.osu.edu/Private_recert.For those new or younger folks who will be applying fertilizer, you will attend a three-hour long program; check the Nutrient Education website and just look for those comprehensive three-hour meetings.And as we get closer to winter meeting season we will post those regional and area agronomy and update meetings. Our Agronomic Crops Team calendar is pretty thin now, but will be full before Christmas. So check our website: http://agcrops.osu.edu/events/calendar, for the events and their locations. A couple of events on my calendar for crop producers include:• The Ohio No-Till Conference is December 7th at the Der Dutchman Restaurant, 445 S. Jefferson, Plain City. For more information: https://ohionotillcouncil.com/2016/11/15/2016-winter-conference/.• And the annual Ohio Grain Farmers Symposium on December 20, 2016, at the Nationwide & Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center in Columbus. Register today at www.ohiograinfarmerssymposium.org.last_img read more

Experts say NS intimate photos case unlikely to deter teens

first_imgBRIDGEWATER, N.S. – It had all the trappings of a typical teen romance, until it became part of a high-profile case that shines a light on the consequences of mixing digital images and sexuality.The 14-year-old girl had known the boy since they were young. When they talked in class, he would compliment her looks and tell her that he liked her.The boy would talk about how they could trust each other, according to court documents, then asked her for photos, including full nudes.“He asked her repeatedly and explained that it was ‘no big deal,’” the documents said.The boy is one of six male teenagers in Bridgewater, N.S., who have admitted to distributing intimate images of at least 20 girls between the ages of 13 and 17 without their consent. They will be sentenced in Bridgewater provincial court Monday.When the six were charged in July 2016, four of the accused were 15 years old and the other two were 18. However, all were under 18 when the offences were committed, which means their identities are protected from publication under the Youth Criminal Justice Act. The victims’ identities are also protected.The case is one of Canada’s largest involving a relatively untested law designed to combat the non-consensual sharing of intimate images.A Crown attorney said in March that he hopes the case raises awareness about the criminal consequences of this kind of behaviour, but experts say the law may do little to deter teenage sexuality.“It’s not clear that the law will be deterrent one way or the other, especially in the world of teenage hormones and sexuality run amok,” said Wayne MacKay, a law professor at Dalhousie University.Documents submitted in court said two Dropbox accounts were created for the purpose of sharing dozens of intimate images of girls in various states of undress, including fully nude.An agreed statement of facts said everyone who uploaded photos either knew outright or were “wilfully blind” to the fact that the subjects didn’t consent to their distribution.In the statement, the photos’ subjects cited a variety of motivations for sending the images.Some young women felt pressured by what they described as persistent requests for intimate images, while others said they were vying for boys’ affections or just joking around, the statement said.The document said one 13-year-old girl was repeatedly asked for sexual photos by one of the accused over the course of several days, despite persistent rejection.“The next day at school (the boy) and his friends were clustered near her locker and gave her the impression that they were talking about her. She felt pressured,” the document said, noting that she ended up sending the photos out of fear that he would spread a rumour about her.McKay said it can be hard to draw the line between flirtation and coercion in intimate images cases, particularly when they involve young people.He said the Bridgewater case shows the digital distribution of such images can reinforce high school social dynamics — like boys bragging about their sexual conquests, while girls are shamed for theirs — but said technology poses new potential for harm.“I still think it’s important that we not minimize too much because that does send the wrong message that this is just boys being boys,” he said. “Some of these things have gone on forever, but because of the nature of social media and technology, the images and the damage is ongoing forever, potentially.”The intimate images bill, which became law in 2015, was introduced after the death of Nova Scotia teen Rehtaeh Parsons, which captured national attention.The 17-year-old died by suicide in 2013 after a photo — of what her family says was a sexual assault — was circulated among students at her school in Cole Harbour, N.S.Lara Karaian, a criminology professor at Carleton University, said in the age of “sexual romance 2.0,” the circulation of intimate images has become the norm, and teens’ attitudes have shifted accordingly.“This is not a trend that is going away. This is a new mode of sexual expression for young people,” Karaian said in an interview. “How much are we willing to use the law against so many young people who are doing this?”McKay agreed that the legislation on intimate images has lagged behind the pace of technology and said we have to look outside the courtroom to address this growing phenomenon.In the Bridgewater case, McKay said the distribution of images appeared to be so “systematic” that he thinks legal consequences could be appropriate.He said the six accused could face court-ordered restrictions at the sentencing hearing Monday, including a prohibition on access to the Internet.“For young people in the modern world, limiting their social media is what they’ll take note of,” he said. “For some, it may even be a bigger deterrent than time in custody.”— By Adina Bresge in Halifax.last_img read more

Feds to introduce codeveloped legislation on Indigenous child services in 2019

first_imgOTTAWA — The Liberal government says it will introduce federal legislation on Indigenous child and family services in the new year, written in co-operation with Indigenous groups.Indigenous Services Minister Jane Philpott says Canada has taken Indigenous kids from their families for more than a century through residential schools and child-welfare agencies.Philpott says this proposed legislation will end that. She says taking kids away because their families live in poverty or because they have unresolved health issues will not be allowed.Philpott made the announcement in the House of Commons foyer today alongside Assembly of First Nationals National Chief Perry Bellegarde, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami President Natan Obed, and Métis National Council President Clément Chartier.Indigenous children are more than 50 per cent of the children in foster care in private homes in Canada, according to government figures, and they face greater risks of having health problems and being incarcerated.Bellegarde says legislation co-developed with First Nations is an important step toward fixing the system, and Obed called it an “unprecedented initiative” that will ensure the survival, dignity and well-being of families, communities and nation for generations to come. The Canadian Presslast_img read more

AP Interview Argentine leader sees tough road ahead

first_imgBUENOS AIRES, Argentina — Argentina’s president is celebrating the successful hosting of the G-20 summit, but he says he’s ready for tough times ahead as the country confronts an economic crisis.Macri told The Associated Press in an interview Monday that Argentina struck about $8 billion in investment deals with other nations on the sidelines of the summit — most focused on energy and infrastructure.Argentina earlier obtained a record $56 billion loan from the International Monetary Fund.But Macri said that Argentina has a long way to go in dealing with its economic crisis following a sharp depreciation of the Argentine currency that he called a “disaster.”The peso has depreciated by about half this year and the country suffers one of the world’s highest inflation rates.Luis Andres Henao And Almudena Calatrava, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Province asking residents to be careful camping this long weekend

first_imgVICTORIA, B.C. – The Province is asking residents to be cautious this long weekend when enjoying the outdoors.Campfire bans remain in place for all of B.C. except for here in the B.C. Peace, in the Fort Nelson Forest District and in the “Fog Zone” on the west coast of Vancouver Island.The 2018 fire season is far from over. While temperatures have dropped, various levels of rainfall are occurring, and the smoke has cleared throughout most of the province, the risk of wildfires remains high. Currently, 518 wildfires are burning in B.C., with 53 fires that are highly visible or pose a potential threat to public safety. Everyone is urged to use extreme caution with any outdoor activity to ensure no human-caused wildfires are added to an already challenging workload. Human-caused fires are entirely preventable and unnecessarily divert firefighting resources from naturally occurring wildfires.From April 1 to Aug. 30, 2018, the BC Wildfire Service responded to 2,015 wildfires throughout the province, with 444 of those fires caused by people. Over 1.25 million hectares have been burned in the province to date, surpassing last year’s record of 1.21 million hectares burned. This means 2018 experienced the highest number of hectares burned in the province’s history.Information about current open burning prohibitions, including campfire bans, is available on the BC Wildfire Service website: http://gov.bc.ca/wildfirebanslast_img read more

EC to closely monitor PMs rally at Brigade Parade ground today

first_imgKolkata: Election Commission officials would capture videos of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s election rally at Brigade Parade ground on Wednesday.The commission will also keep a tab on the rally to ascertain if there is any violation of the Model Code of Conduct (MCC). The commission will also carry out an assessment to know if the entire cost of organising the rally has been spent as declared by the state BJP leaders, while taking permission for it. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaThe commission will also monitor to see if the controversial theme song of the party sung by its Asansol MP Babul Supriyo is played during the rally. The song is yet to receive permission from the EC. Meanwhile, Special Central Police Observer Vivek Dubey will hold meeting with all the observers at Siliguri Circuit Bench on Wednesday, to take a stock on the poll-preparedness in the two districts that will go to poll in the first phase on April 11. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwaySeven companies of Central Forces have been sent to North Bengal for the first phase of polls. The first phase of elections would be held in Alipurduar and Cooch Behar. Sanjay Basu, additional Chief Electoral Officer, said that seven companies have been taken from the existing 10 companies which have been presently deployed in the state. The forces have been sent to the North Bengal districts as a part of the confidence boosting measure.last_img read more