In Short

first_img== Promise for naan ==Arnaouti Pitta Bread Bakery, Herts, has won an award for its Eastern Promises design and print for its speciality naan breads and snack naans. Jefta Kon Lakovich, chief executive of Arnaouti, said the top web design was printed on a 45-micron high-barrier film and ran trouble-free, despite tight tolerances on widths required.== Scots’ training award ==Scottish food and drink companies are being encouraged to enter a new category that recognises investment in training and staff development at the Scotland Food and Drink Excellence Awards. The deadline for entries is 6 March and the event is to be held at Glasgow’s Kelvingrove Museum on 7 May.== Warburtons’ aid gift ==Warburtons has donated a 12-tonne truck from its Burnley bakery to the International Aid Trust, so volunteers can collect and distribute humanitarian aid. The truck is in Romania and has transported tonnes of food, clothing, shoes and bedding.== Hygiene fine for baker ==A bakery in Kidderminster has been fined £2,000 and ordered to pay £1,500 costs for failing to comply with food hygiene regulations. The owner admitted the offence at Hereford Crown Court. Environmental health officers found grease and debris, carbonised baking trays and dirty bread rolling machines. In mitigation, the defence said the baker had done a food hygiene course and alterations costing £25,000.== Distribution link-up ==Pastries specialist Brioche Pasquier and puddings producer Farmhouse Fare are to use logistics services provider NFT’s shared user network to deliver their products to Marks & Spencer’s regional distribution centres.last_img read more

Solvay boys bowlers remain atop OHSL standings

first_img Tags: bowlingSolvayWest Genesee The Solvay girls had its own 7-0 victory over APW, with Abigail Lee at the forefront as she got a 176 game in the middle of her 430 series. Kiyyasia Elien earned a 402 series and Michalena Raymond had a three-game total of 353.In a key battle on Friday, Solvay met Bishop Grimes, and it proved the closest match of the season so far, but the Bearcats held off the Cobras 4-3 to improve to 9-1.This happened despite Grimes having a pinfall of 2,483 to Solvay’s 2,364. Matysuk had a 525 series closed by a 194, with Bigelow (477 series) just ahead of Tarbell (473 series) as Owen Britton contributed a 452 series. Another 7-0 victory for the Solvay girls put its overall record at 8-2, this time with Anastasia LaFlair in front thanks to a 468 series that included an opening game of 175.Caitlin McCann earned a 443 series and high game of 162. Rylie Dwyer, with a 442 series, was one pin behind McCann, while Lee had a three-game total of 409.West Genesee faced Baldwinsville on Friday, and the Wildcats lost both ends of that match at B’ville Sports Bowl.The 3-0 defeat by the boys Wildcats had Richard Wituszynski shoot a pair of 200 games in his 585 series. Bobby Bidwell closed with 214 and 205 in his 559 set.Connor Mathewson (534 series) and Deano Procopio (501 series) were close behind as B’ville’s Tanner Rozyczko shot a 675 series, with Dylan Love shooting a 266 game and Eric Hildreth a 254 game.The girls match had WG falling 3-0 even though Lorelai Leskoske was quite impressive with a 197 game closing out a 545 series.Rebecca Wituszynski, with a 441 series, beat out the 418 set from Cassie Felicia as B’ville’s Amelia Ponto improved from a 187 to a 209 to a 233 during her 629 set.Solvay’s girls also got a 7-0 victory over APW to move to 6-2 on the season, with Abigail Lee leading the way thanks to her 430 series. Kiyyasia Elien earned a 403 series, while Michalena Raymond had a three-game total of 353.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story center_img It continues to be a breakthrough season for the Solvay boys bowling team as it had only dropped a single match this season, to Homer on Dec. 15.The Bearcats’ run continued last Tuesday at Strike-N-Spare Lanes with a 7-0 romp over Altmar-Parish-Williamstown, led by Russ Tarbell, who closed with a 194 as part of a 555 series.Just behind Tarbell, Ethan Bigelow started with games of 189 and 214 during his 551 set as Ed Matysuk earned a 470 series and Alex Gallardo had a three-game total of 444.last_img read more

iSchool professor coaches Finland, Portugal’s rowing teams

first_imgSyracuse University professor Michael D’Eredita established the first varsity sport in Finland. While coaching overseas in Turku, Finland in 2000, he and a team created University Rowing. Previously, sports were available through clubs and were not university-sponsored. He went on to coach Finland’s national rowing team, bringing them back-to-back scholars in the World Rowing Cup and the 2000 World Championship title. He was also responsible for two rowers winning the World Rowing Cup lightweight women’s single and lightweight men’s single scull event for Finland.Fifteen years later, the iSchool professor is still coaching, now as the high performance director for Portugal’s national rowing team.He’s led both the Finland and Portugal teams to Rowing World Cup medals. As the high performance director, D’Eredita is in charge of creating a system including a team of coaches, athletes and a training program.D’Eredita’s passion for rowing began when he was on the rowing team in high school in Liverpool, New York.“I purposefully took to rowing for two reasons — one person told me that it was the hardest sport so I took it as a challenge,” D’Eredita said. “The other reason I chose it was that I always viewed it as a lifelong sport.”When he was in graduate school studying cognitive/experimental psychology at Syracuse University, he was the graduate assistant for the university’s rowing team. He went on to coach U.S. developmental and U.S. pre-elite teams, before traveling to Finland in 2000. Around the same time, he took a job teaching at SU.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDespite the travel required for him to coach, D’Eredita’s work overseas doesn’t interfere with his teaching profession. The professor has chosen to live in the United States in order to keep teaching at SU.Marcene Sonneborn, an iSchool professor who teaches classes on information technology startups with D’Eredita, said D’Eredita’s traveling has never been a problem for the two of them. Sonneborn added that they work collaboratively to plan out the semester.Sonneborn, who has worked with D’Eredita for about six years, added D’Eredita’s passion for rowing is evident.“When he talks about rowing, that is his true love and it’s just something that he gets a lot personally from it, and he is always very animated when he talks about it,” Sonneborn said. “When he talks about the individuals he’s coaching, it’s almost like a father coaching a son,” Sonneborn said.It was this passion for coaching that led D’Eredita from a winning Finland to a less-talented Portugal in 2003. The national team was performing very poorly, and needed to win medals in an Olympic event at the Senior or Under 23 World Championships by 2004. If Portugal didn’t, its Olympic Committee was going to deem rowing as a recreational sport and stop funding the team.When D’Eredita arrived to coach, one of Portugal’s best athletes, named Luis Teixeira, was ready to quit. But after one week at training camp with D’Eredita, the athlete had a change of heart. With D’Eredita as the new coach, Portugal won two bronze medals at two World Cup events and won the silver medal at the Under 23 Championships that the team needed in 2004.Adrian Hatch, a junior information management and technology major, said D’Eredita’s success as a coach shows in his teaching of entrepreneurship. He said D’Eredita knows how to build and run a team, and teach someone else to do the same.“You can tell he has a passion. He made the point that you don’t have to be a rower to teach these guys, because you can be passionate about rowing,” said Hatch, who has taken several classes with D’Eredita. “But all the guys on the team are great at rowing. They are as good as it’s going to get.”When a new administration took over the Portugal Rowing Federation in 2004, D’Eredita got replaced by a new coach. But when the state of rowing dropped during the new administration, Teixeira, who trained with D’Eredita, started his own international training center and four-star hotel. In 2011, Teixeira decided to run for president of the rowing federation. He asked D’Eredita to come back to Portugal to “clean up the mess” made by the new administration.Teixeira is now the president of the Portugal Rowing Federation, a position he’s held since 2012. He was the one who asked D’Eredita to come back to Portugal as high performance director.“I’m addicted to building something from nothing. While there wasn’t ‘nothing’ there, in terms of international results and a system, there wasn’t a system. So that’s the fun part,” D’Eredita said. “It’s building a system that hopefully will continue to turn out results in the long run.”D’Eredita believes failure is a great thing, however. It teaches athletes that the gold medals are earned and don’t just happen because of luck.“The woman I used to coach, Laila Finska, used to say that you have to learn how to lose before you win and she’s right,” D’Eredita said. “What is really meant by that is, to really lose means you are going into an event thinking and believing you are going to win. That’s when you really lose.” Comments Published on February 5, 2015 at 12:57 am Contact: [email protected] Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

USC Hillel pilots mental health, wellness initiative

first_imgThe Bradley Sonnenberg Wellness Initiative funded by Glenn and Andrea Sonnenberg in honor of their late son and from Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles Cutting Edge Grant, will employ a full-time social work professional to take on the role of associate director of health and wellness.  For students across campus, USC Hillel, a small cottage tucked between campus and the Row, serves various purposes. Sometimes it’s a workspace, other times it’s a place for a home-cooked meal or an escape from the stress of college. Earlier this month, USC Hillel took on another role when it launched a wellness initiative to help students struggling with mental health. “In this plugged-in, ever-alienating society of ours, I think that there are not a lot of resources for people who may have issues,” Glenn Sonnenberg said. “Maybe not even big issues, but just day-to-day sort of making it through, [like] participating [in] activities with others and having a safe place to chill and maybe having somebody to talk to — it drove us to this wellness initiative.” Ilana Cohen, a junior studying cognitive science who frequently visits Hillel, said she hopes students will take advantage of the resources available through the initiative.  Putting student wellness high on the priority list is nothing new for USC Hillel. Past leadership, like former Executive Director Bailey London, emphasized Hillel’s role in addressing mental health on campus through informational workshops and organized activities that allowed students to unplug and take a breather.  The Sonnenbergs additionally stressed the importance of placing the initiative within reach of any student seeking help or someone to talk to, regardless of religious identity. Hillel also plans to continue weekly activities such as hiking, yoga and community sports as a part of its physical wellness program. center_img “Anyone who works on campus [knows] the pressures students face and the varying ways, and sometimes specialized ways, we might need to offer to respond to those pressures and to encourage healthy balance,” Cohn said. Dave Cohn, who is starting as this year’s executive director for USC Hillel, hopes to carry on the legacy that past leadership has instituted in making student wellness a high priority. Cohn previously worked for Hillel at UCLA and has spent years with college students at summer camps and university camps.  “In the past, especially recently, there were all these attacks on the Jewish community, and Hillel was a really great space to go to,” Cohen said. “They react and take care of the students immediately, and they bring you in. So this initiative is great because even outside the Jewish community things are always going on and problems are always arising. You always will need someone to talk to.” “The [Engemann Student Health Center] is not able to help everybody,” Andrea Sonnenberg said. “They’re overwhelmed by the demand. People can’t get in; they can’t get in for months, and they only get a certain number of sessions, so that’s part of the reason why the need is so great. There’s just not the supply.” American college students show higher rates of diagnosis for poor mental health, particularly for anxiety, depression and panic attacks, according to a study published by the Journal of American College Health last year. USC Hillel already provides resources for students struggling with drug addiction and depression, but this initiative takes that support much further by adding professionalization to an already established wellness program. last_img read more

Nelson Minor Hockey opens up registration for 2016-17 campaign

first_imgFor more information, and/or to register, go to the Nelson Minor Hockey website. Now that the hockey season is winding down, it’s time for parents and players to prepare for next season as Nelson Minor Hockey has opened up the registration lines for applications for the 2016-17 campaign.Players wanting to play Rep Hockey should note the deadline for registration is May 31, 2016. This allows executive members and coaches to plan for tournaments and games for the upcoming season.House players have until uly 31, 2016 to sign up for the upcoming season.last_img read more