iSchool professor coaches Finland, Portugal’s rowing teams

first_imgSyracuse University professor Michael D’Eredita established the first varsity sport in Finland. While coaching overseas in Turku, Finland in 2000, he and a team created University Rowing. Previously, sports were available through clubs and were not university-sponsored. He went on to coach Finland’s national rowing team, bringing them back-to-back scholars in the World Rowing Cup and the 2000 World Championship title. He was also responsible for two rowers winning the World Rowing Cup lightweight women’s single and lightweight men’s single scull event for Finland.Fifteen years later, the iSchool professor is still coaching, now as the high performance director for Portugal’s national rowing team.He’s led both the Finland and Portugal teams to Rowing World Cup medals. As the high performance director, D’Eredita is in charge of creating a system including a team of coaches, athletes and a training program.D’Eredita’s passion for rowing began when he was on the rowing team in high school in Liverpool, New York.“I purposefully took to rowing for two reasons — one person told me that it was the hardest sport so I took it as a challenge,” D’Eredita said. “The other reason I chose it was that I always viewed it as a lifelong sport.”When he was in graduate school studying cognitive/experimental psychology at Syracuse University, he was the graduate assistant for the university’s rowing team. He went on to coach U.S. developmental and U.S. pre-elite teams, before traveling to Finland in 2000. Around the same time, he took a job teaching at SU.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDespite the travel required for him to coach, D’Eredita’s work overseas doesn’t interfere with his teaching profession. The professor has chosen to live in the United States in order to keep teaching at SU.Marcene Sonneborn, an iSchool professor who teaches classes on information technology startups with D’Eredita, said D’Eredita’s traveling has never been a problem for the two of them. Sonneborn added that they work collaboratively to plan out the semester.Sonneborn, who has worked with D’Eredita for about six years, added D’Eredita’s passion for rowing is evident.“When he talks about rowing, that is his true love and it’s just something that he gets a lot personally from it, and he is always very animated when he talks about it,” Sonneborn said. “When he talks about the individuals he’s coaching, it’s almost like a father coaching a son,” Sonneborn said.It was this passion for coaching that led D’Eredita from a winning Finland to a less-talented Portugal in 2003. The national team was performing very poorly, and needed to win medals in an Olympic event at the Senior or Under 23 World Championships by 2004. If Portugal didn’t, its Olympic Committee was going to deem rowing as a recreational sport and stop funding the team.When D’Eredita arrived to coach, one of Portugal’s best athletes, named Luis Teixeira, was ready to quit. But after one week at training camp with D’Eredita, the athlete had a change of heart. With D’Eredita as the new coach, Portugal won two bronze medals at two World Cup events and won the silver medal at the Under 23 Championships that the team needed in 2004.Adrian Hatch, a junior information management and technology major, said D’Eredita’s success as a coach shows in his teaching of entrepreneurship. He said D’Eredita knows how to build and run a team, and teach someone else to do the same.“You can tell he has a passion. He made the point that you don’t have to be a rower to teach these guys, because you can be passionate about rowing,” said Hatch, who has taken several classes with D’Eredita. “But all the guys on the team are great at rowing. They are as good as it’s going to get.”When a new administration took over the Portugal Rowing Federation in 2004, D’Eredita got replaced by a new coach. But when the state of rowing dropped during the new administration, Teixeira, who trained with D’Eredita, started his own international training center and four-star hotel. In 2011, Teixeira decided to run for president of the rowing federation. He asked D’Eredita to come back to Portugal to “clean up the mess” made by the new administration.Teixeira is now the president of the Portugal Rowing Federation, a position he’s held since 2012. He was the one who asked D’Eredita to come back to Portugal as high performance director.“I’m addicted to building something from nothing. While there wasn’t ‘nothing’ there, in terms of international results and a system, there wasn’t a system. So that’s the fun part,” D’Eredita said. “It’s building a system that hopefully will continue to turn out results in the long run.”D’Eredita believes failure is a great thing, however. It teaches athletes that the gold medals are earned and don’t just happen because of luck.“The woman I used to coach, Laila Finska, used to say that you have to learn how to lose before you win and she’s right,” D’Eredita said. “What is really meant by that is, to really lose means you are going into an event thinking and believing you are going to win. That’s when you really lose.” Comments Published on February 5, 2015 at 12:57 am Contact: [email protected] Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Northern players shine at St Rule Trophy

first_img The St Rule Trophy, played over the New and Old courses at St Andrews, turned into a Cheshire and Lancashire celebration thanks to Emma Goddard, Bethany Garton, Emily Taylor, Charlotte Wild and Brogan Townend. Emma Goddard (Royal Liverpool Ladies’) was runner-up on five-under par for the 54-hole event, finishing two shots behind the winner, Scottish champion Laura Murray. Emma (image © Leaderboard Photography) had posted the clubhouse target of five-under-par 222 with half the field still to come in, after scoring four-under-par 72 in the final round on the Old Course. In the end only Laura Murray overhauled the Cheshire player. Emma had a startling recovery from a double bogey six at the comparatively simple first hole when she birdied the next five holes and also the ninth to be out in four-under-par 34. She bogeyed the 11th but birdied the 13th in level par 38 home. Bethany Garton (Royal Lytham & St Annes, Lancashire) saved her best to last, shooting the low score of the tournament in the final round with a six-under 70 which lifted her into a share of third place on her debut appearance. The 18-year-old had 31 putts in a bogey-free round. Irish strokeplay champion Emily Taylor (Royal Lytham & St Annes) won the U18 event for the Lawson Trophy. Her final round of 71 was the joint second best and included six birdies with just one bogey. The field of 17 competitors aged U18 was a record for the tournament, which was first played in 1984. Overall, Emily tied for seventh place with Charlotte Wild (Mere, Cheshire), who had a great run in the middle of the final round with birdies on the fourth-fifth-sixth and then on the eighth-ninth-tenth. Charlotte is a past English strokeplay champion. Charlotte, Emily and Brogan Townend (Pleasington, Lancashire) combined to give England second place in the international team event, two shots behind the winners, Scotland. Leading final scores Par 227 New Course (first round) par 75, CSS 76 Old Course par 76, CSS 78 76 220 Laura Murray (Alford) 73 74 73 222 Emma Goddard (Royal Liverpool Ladies) 75 72 72 223 Bethany Garton (Royal Lytham) 74 79 70, Jenny Haglund (Sweden) 73 78 72, Louise Kenney (Pitreavie) 74 75 74 224 Megan Briggs (Kilmacolm) 76 77 71 225 Emily M Taylor (Royal Lytham) 76 78 71, Charlotte Wild (Mere) 78 73 74 226 Eilidh Briggs (Kilmacolm) 76 74 76 227 Jessica Meek (Carnoustie Ladies) 75 77 75 228 Jane Turner (Craigielaw) 76 76 76, Clara Young (North Berwick) 79 76 73, Kelsey MacDonald (Nairn Dunbar) 77 78 73 231 Emilie Lundstrom (Sweden) 78 81 72 232 Lesley Atkins (Gullane Ladies)  74 75 83, Ailsa Summers (Carnoustie Ladies) 80 76 76, Ami Storey (Ponteland) 79 77 76, Jess Wilcox (Blankney) 78 79 75 233 Chloe Williams (Wrexham) 79 79 75, Gabriella Cowley (West Essex) 74 77 82, Alyson McKechin (Elderslie) 76 85 72 234 Rachael McQueen (Troon Ladies) 78 80 76, Susan Jackson (Ladybank) 77 78 79 235 Hannah McCook (Grantown on Spey) 80 78 77, Lauren Blease (Burhill) 76 81 78, Samantha Birks (Wolstanton) 75 83 77, Joelle Van Baarle (Belgium) 82 78 75, Brogan Townend (Pleasington) 76 81 78 6 Jun 2012 Northern players shine at St Rule Trophy last_img read more