Innovation Program Director – CCI

first_img Johns Hopkins University Level of Independent DecisionMaking:High level of independentdecision makingClassifiedTitle:Sr. Program ManagerWorking Title: Innovation Program Director -CCI ​​​​​Role/Level/Range: ATP/04/PG Starting Salary Range:Commensurate withExperienceEmployee group: Full Time Schedule: 5/37.5 Exempt Status: ExemptLocation: 01-MD:Homewood Campus Department name: 60006654-KSAS – Centers for Civic ImpactPersonnel area: School of Arts &SciencesThe successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject toa pre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply dependingon which campus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www.eeoc.gov/sites/default/files/migrated_files/employers/poster_screen_reader_optimized.pdf Reputation Marketing Manager Salary Not Specified Program Officer II Maryland, United States HomewoodCampus Facebook Twitter More searches like this GeneralSummary/Purpose:Johns Hopkins Universityseeks an Innovation Program Director for its soon-to-be-launchedcenter focused on public sector innovation, city transformation,and civic engagement. The new center will become a globallyrecognized organization focused on advancing the art and science ofpublic sector innovation, especially among local governments.Specifically, the center will advance research, engage students,and support local governments around organizational, program, andpolicy innovation.Working closely with the inaugural Executive Director and othersenior leadership, the Innovation Program Director will play acritical role in developing the center, designing and deliveringprograms, and building a team to increase the legitimacy and impactof local government innovation with a special emphasis on the waysin which residents contribute to the design, development, anddelivery of new services and policy approaches. The InnovationProgram Director will work in close collaboration with BloombergPhilanthropies, which has been a pioneer in supporting creativitywith city halls for the past decade and is providing the initialfunding for the new center.Under the direction of the Innovation Program Director, the Centerwill deliver technical assistance and training to city hall teams,to help them engage residents more effectively, design creativeinitiatives to tackle urban challenges, and apply approaches suchas human-centered design, crowdsourcing, and behavioral science todeliver better results for residents. The selected candidate musthave expertise in public sector innovation and experience leadingteams or organizations; an understanding of local government;exceptional leadership skills; comfort liaising with the highestlevels of city government; and a deep commitment to impact andmeasurement.The Innovation Program Director must have a forward-thinkingmindset and the vision to lead innovation strategy and deliverimpactful programs that benefit city residents, both expanding onthe legacy of existing initiatives and designing new ones. Ourideal candidate will demonstrate a strong point of view on theopportunity to reimagine the role and opportunities of localgovernments, what it means to create meaningful civic engagement,and the capacity for transformational resident-driveninnovation.The new center is committed to addressing structural and entrenchedracism and recognizes the public sector’s role in perpetuatingthese legacies over time and addressing them today. We are lookingfor a leader committed to dismantling structural and entrenchedracism and addressing these issues, both as they build a neworganization and advance this work in communities.This position reports tothe Executive Director.SpecificDuties/Responsibilities:In partnership with Centerleadership and funders, developing a strategy for innovationprogramming that helps build the field of public sector innovation,including establishing clear goals and measuring progress towardsthose goalsOverseeing the delivery ofmultiple innovation programs in cities around the world incoordination with staff, partner organizations, and philanthropicfundersEstablishing the Center asan international thought leader for governmentinnovationOverseeing the developmentof materials presenting innovation trends and results seen incitiesDeveloping and documentingbest practices in the field of government innovation, ensuringlocal governments can learn from one anotherBuilding a world-classteam to deliver innovation programming, and providing regularprofessional development on best practices and deliverymethodsOverseeing the work ofcenter staff and partner organizations delivering technicalassistance, ensuring engagements meet targeted goals and aredelivered on budgetBuilding and maintainingstrong relationships with city leaders, elected officials, andcritical stakeholdersRepresenting the center toexternal stakeholders including governments, philanthropy,nonprofit organizations, and academic and public sectorleadersOther duties asassigned Academic Affairs Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Salary Not Specified Business & Administrative Affairs Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Similar jobs LinkedIn You need to sign in or create an account to save You need to sign in or create an account to save Special knowledge, skills, andabilities:Experience with MicrosoftOffice, G Suite, and project management applicationsFamiliarity with learningmanagement systemsExperience using projectmanagement and collaboration software such as Asana andSlackDemonstrated effectivenessin coordinating with subject matter expertsUnderstanding ofqualitative and quantitative research methodsExcellent oral, written,communications, and research skillsCommitment to a collegialworkplaceCapacity to workindependently and in a results-oriented workplaceAbility to work onmultiple projects concurrentlycenter_img Salary Not Specified Johns Hopkins University Apply(This will open in a new window from which you will be automatically redirected to an external site after 5 seconds) Save Program Officer II Save Reputation Marketing Manager Enrollment Marketing Specialist Save Enrollment Marketing Specialist Maryland, United States Johns Hopkins University You need to sign in or create an account to save Maryland, United States Research Administration Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Minimum Qualifications(mandatory):Master’s degree in publicpolicy or related fieldAt least five years’experience in the field of government innovationExperience managingdiverse teamsAdditional education maysubstitute for experience, and additional experience may substituterequired education to the extent permitted by the JHU EquivalencyFormulaPreferredQualifications:City hall experience orother experience working with citiesGovernment transformationand program delivery experience, changing how government works toserve residents and delivering results-oriented programs, fromdesign to implementation to storytelling and impactmeasurementDiplomatic and customerservice orientation to liaise with the highest levels of governmentand successfully achieve common goals in cities—maximizing theimpact of programs, pushing for new innovation methodologies thatmay be unfamiliar, and collaboratively clearingroadblocksInterest in forgingrelationships between cities and growing a worldwide network ofgovernment innovation practitionersStrong communicationsskills to serve as a persuasive representative for programs withcities and partner organizations and at public forumsA record of strongprofessional achievements in public policy, public administration,or a related fieldProven ability to develop,manage, and thrive in relationships with public sector executivesand senior staffersSeasoned personnel skillsto manage a team of mid-level professionalsAbility to work in andlead teams in a result-driven workplaceExtensive familiarity withgovernment, nonprofit, and philanthropic stakeholdersUnderstanding of andability to communicate stories about the impact of innovation onthe public sector Share The successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject to apre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office at [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply depending on whichcampus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster.pdfImportant legal informationhttp://hrnt.jhu.edu/legal.cfm Administrative Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Other Business & Administrative Affairs Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimorelast_img read more

EVSC Officials Plan To Work With Schools On National Walkout

first_imgFEBRUARY 22ND, 2018 Amanda Decker AMANDA DECKER INDIANA, KENTUCKY Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation officials say they are aware of a national student walk-out that is scheduled to take place on March 14th.The walkout is in response to recent school shootings and threats and is being organized by the Women’s March group.In a tweet posted Thursday, EVSC says it plans to work with schools and student leadership groups to help find a way for students to gather in a peaceful and organized manner.Amanda DeckerAmanda Decker44News Executive Producer and Evening Anchor. Amanda is a native of Indianapolis, Indiana and joined WEVV from Little Rock, Arkansas where she worked at Independent News Network. Amanda graduated from Ball State with degrees in Telecommunications, Journalism, and Political Science.More PostsFollow Me:TwitterFacebook FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

JERSEY CITY BRIEFS

first_imgLiberty Science Center planetarium now largest in hemisphereWhen the new planetarium at the Liberty Science Center in Jersey City opens this Saturday, Dec. 9, it will be the largest in the Western Hemisphere and the fourth largest in the world. Formerly, largest planetarium in the hemisphere was the Hayden Planetarium at the Museum of Natural History in Manhattan.Neil deGrasse Tyson, director of the Manhattan planetarium, told the New York Times that the new planetarium has advantages due to greater transportation access for New Jersey school groups. If the new facility has a top-of-the-line projector, he added, “That’s great.” Paul Hoffman, president and CEO of the Liberty Science Center responded that his planetarium has 10 projectors.The LSC planetarium will officially open this weekend. It boasts 88 million pixels, an 89-foot diameter screen that can project 280 trillion color possibilities. At least 250,000 school children are expected to visit the planetarium annually.The center, officially the Jennifer Chalsty Planetarium, is named after a former high school teacher who donated $5 million for its construction.Best Christmas Decorated Home ContestThe annual Jersey City Best Decorated Home Contest returns for its 15th year, and now includes Jersey City, Bayonne, North Bergen and Union City. Put on by Hudson Media Group, the contest judges homes that have the best holiday decorations and will award three prizes of $1,000 for the best.Pat O’Melia, the host of the Hudson Media Group’s television program “The Jersey City Show,” said that while the contest will have spotters to go through the various neighborhoods, residents who want their homes judged should contact him to give the address so that the spotter can take a look.Every detail counts, O’Melia said, although he said he has a number of suggestions for residents.With spotters already started, O’Melia said people should use colored or multi-colored lights.“All white ain’t right,” he said.He also said don’t cover your address, and people should decorate the windows. Don’t overdo it with inflatables. People should turn on the lights from 6 p.m. to midnight. Perhaps use a timer. Don’t have Santa in the Nativity scene.Don’t depend on home spotters to find your home send your address to [email protected] or Tweet to: JCHudsonMedia.Downtown side holds holiday marketThe Historic Downtown Special Improvement District will hold its Holiday Market & Craft Fair from Monday, Dec. 18 to Thursday, Dec. 21, from 4 to 8 p.m. at the Grove Street PATH station plaza.Ring Road to be renamed Rotary Club of Jersey City WayThe Board of Freeholders voted in early December to rename the Ring Road area in Lincoln Park as “Ring Road, also known as the Rotary Club of Jersey City Way.” The Rotary Club of Jersey City was formed in 1916, becoming the 249th Rotary Club in the world.In the resolution passed, the freeholders said: “Personifying the Rotary International motto of “Service Above Self,” Jersey City Rotarians have continuously supported the efforts of many Jersey City civic, community and philanthropic groups, including the Jersey City Chapter of the American Red Cross and the Jersey City Boys and Girls Club.”The Rotary Club of Jersey City has helped in the development of the city’s youth, as evidenced by a vigorous college scholarship program. For the past 40 years the Club has awarded to an outstanding 8th grade student in each of Jersey City’s 28 public grammar schools its coveted “Davy Jones Rotary Youth Citizenship Award.”In the 21st Century, the club has managed to adapt to a changing city and population. The club leaders have established partnerships with other organizations and charities to meet the needs of a modern city. This created more opportunities for membership and attendance to meet the needs of a modern workforce. Regularly scheduled opportunities for hands on community service are a big part of the club calendar. Membership in the club has reached its greatest number in decades.NJ Transit pays Franco over land on Hoboken’s borderAccording to reports, NJ Transit paid $6.13 million to the family of a reputed mobster in a settlement for land the agency wanted for a tunnel project cancelled in 2010.The settlement was with Township of Washington resident Carmine “Papa Smurf” Franco over the value of a 1.89 acre piece of land of the border of Hoboken and Weehawken was condemned by NJ Transit for the ARC tunnel project canceled by Gov. Chris Christie in October 2010.NJ Transit’s board approved the settlement with M & C Franco & Co. in August.NJ Transit and the Franco family disputed over the property’s value in court since 2010. In 2012, a Hudson County jury valued the land at $8.15 million. However, a state appellate court gave NJ Transit a victory in 2016 after the agency appealed the verdict.The three-judge-panel ruled that the higher value wasn’t appropriate because it depended on the landowner winning approvals from two municipalities to change zoning to allow residential development on the property.According to reports, Franco was was sentenced to a year in prison on racketeering charges in 2014 and released on June 11, 2015.Santa to come to Loews TheatreSanta will come to the Historic Loews Theater in Journal Square on Saturday, Dec. 9 from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Pets are welcome between noon and 1:30 p.m.This is the 24th year the program has been held, and guests are welcome to bring their kids for photographs with Santa in the grand lobby of the theatre.Do you have a story in your head, or a piece of writing in the works?Reporter editor and published novelist Caren Lissner is bringing her one-shot writing class to Little City Books in Hoboken again in January. Do you have an idea for a novel, story, memoir, essay, or script, or have something partly written but don’t know the next steps? You can bring up to two pages, double spaced (500 words) for critique and publication advice, or just sit in on the class and participate in the discussions, without bringing anything.The next “Get It Out” class takes place Tuesday, Jan. 23, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the book store, located four blocks from the Hoboken PATH/light rail station. There’s a nominal fee for those bringing work to read, and a lower fee for those who just want to sit in and participate in the discussion.“There are so many ways to get published these days,” said Lissner. “Anyone who’s working on a piece of writing is a writer. They shouldn’t be shy about getting their work out there.”Lissner’s humorous first novel, Carrie Pilby, was published in 2003, sold 74,000 copies worldwide, and was released as a movie this year (currently airing on Netflix). She has also published both serious and humorous writing in the New York Times, Atlantic.com, McSweeney’s, Harper’s, LitHub, and National Lampoon. Read more of her writing and advice on carenlissner.com.Those with questions can reach her via carenlissner.com. The link to sign up for the class is http://www.littlecitybooks.com/event/get-it-out-writing-and-publishing-workshop-caren-lissner (as a reader or as an auditor), or stop by Little City Books at 100 Bloomfield St., corner of First and Bloomfield, Hoboken. (201) 626-READ.Donate clothes for adults, boys, girls as part of domestic violence driveAllstate agency owners from across New Jersey are coming together to host a supply drive to benefit the New Jersey Coalition to End Domestic Violence (NJCEDV). The donations will support the nonprofit’s mission to provide services to help end domestic violence and financial abuse throughout the state.Now through Dec. 11, the public can participate by donating new winter coats, hats, gloves and scarves for women, boys and girls. A complete list of most-needed supplies can be found here: bit.ly/AllstateFoundationTrenton. Through their volunteer efforts, each participating Allstate agency owner will secure a $1,000 Allstate Foundation Helping Hands® grant. The National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) will accept the grants and distribute the funding to local domestic violence nonprofits. The dates of the donation drives align with the 16 days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence campaign, which NNEDV supports.The following Hudson County Allstate locations are collecting items:4914 Kennedy Blvd., West New York315 Broadway, Bayonne1317 Paterson Plank Road, SecaucusContact Natalie Terchek at 312-558-1770 for more information. The next step in light rail expansionThe expansion of the Hudson Bergen Light Rail line from West Side Avenue to Route 440 was expected to get final state approval on Friday.“As Jersey City continues to grow into the largest city in New Jersey, we have worked to ensure that our local transportation systems can sustain and enhance this growth,” said Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop. “I thank NJ Transit for advancing the process in extending the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail to Route 440 in order to support the future growth of Jersey City’s West Side neighborhood. This expansion will improve connectivity for projects such as Bayfront and New Jersey City University’s new West Campus, and we look forward to working with NJ Transit to further the success of projects such as these, and this important neighborhood.”County Executive Tom DeGise, who was one of the leading advocates for the project, appeared before the NJ Transit board to urge the board to approve the funding.“This means it has cleared the next hurdle,” DeGise said. “The project is estimated to cost about $220 million. This will be a combination of NJ Transit and federal money. The developer is also expected to kick something in.”DeGise said NJ Transit’s portion will need to be matched by federal funding before the project can start construction.“But this is an important step, and something we’ve pushed for years,” DeGise said.last_img read more

Reporting in

first_imgGordon PolsonDirector, Federation of BakersThe end of 2011 is fast approaching and it is time to reflect on a year where health pledges and food myths have played a prominent role.The Department of Health’s Public Health Responsibility Deal was officially launched on 15 March and the Federation of Bakers (FoB) is helping members to deliver against pledges made, focusing on calorie information, trans-fats and salt as part of the Deal.Salt is the biggest area of focus for us and we remain committed to continuing our work to reduce salt levels in bread. However, we need to be realistic about salt reduction targets and we feel that all bread, including unpackaged bread, must aim to meet the same targets if we are to educate the palates of consumers to enjoy a lower-salt product. We also have to bear in mind that salt plays a significant technological role in bread-making.We have worked hard to try and correct some of the myths that perpetuate about bread being unhealthy. We need to help people realise that all bread is good for you. Frequently, we see bread accused of being “fattening”, “high in calories” or “guilty of causing food allergies”. This misleads people, encouraging them away from a valuable carbohydrate important for a healthy diet.On a lighter note, last month The Royal Society of Chemistry revived a Victorian dish, labelled the ’austerity sandwich’ by the media. The meal, costing 7.5p and first promoted by food writer Mrs Beeton, consists of two slices of bread around a slice of toast. The society was offering £200 to anyone who could create a cheaper alternative, showing they, too, recognise what great value bread is, although a more varied assortment of fillings might be worth considering.last_img read more

Inaugural Waterloo Fest Boasts 3 Nights Of SCI, First-Ever JRAD Texas Show, & More

first_imgWaterloo Music Festival, a brand-new jam music and camping festival, will celebrate its inaugural event on September 7th through 9th at Carson Creek Ranch in Austin, Texas. Waterloo Music Festival has tapped a stand-out lineup for its debut, including three nights of the String Cheese Incident, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead’s first-ever performance in Texas, and sets from Railroad Earth, The Motet, Boombox, TAUK, and Marco Benevento, with more artists to be announced in the coming weeks.Carson Creek Ranch is located conveniently just ten minutes from downtown Austin, boasting 60 acres of Pecan tree-lined campgrounds and scenic views of the Colorado River. The festival draws its name from its host city of Austin, Texas—as explained in a press release, Austin was originally incorporated as “Waterloo,” given the city’s prime location along the Colorado River—and is inspired by Austin’s reputation as a premier musical city.Presented by Heard Presents, Havin’ A Ball Productions, and Unknown Entertainment, the three promoters have a longstanding history of bringing music of all genres to Texas while supporting local bands. Given the high demand for jam events in Austin—evidenced by String Cheese Incident’s and many other renowned jam acts’ consistently sold-out, multi-night runs in the Texas capital—the promoters hope that Waterloo Music Festival will become a staple event in the Texas and jam community.Briggs Mitchell, co-founder of Waterloo Music Festival, explained in a press release:With Waterloo, we set out to honor and celebrate the heritage and spirit of Austin with world-class music inspired by our roots and a weekend-long outdoor experience that will make our city proud. … We couldn’t think of a better place to call home than on the banks of the Colorado River, and to us, nothing brings together the creativity and soul of Austin more than three nights of The String Cheese Incident accompanied by an eclectic mix of artists across the jam music spectrum. We believe Austin deserves this festival and we are honored to host what we believe will become a legendary celebration for years to come.Tickets for Waterloo Music Festival go on-sale on Friday, May 11th, at 10 a.m., with a limited number of pre-sale tickets available—pre-sale ticket pricing includes $99 3-day GA passes, $199 3-day VIP passes, and camping packages starting at $70 (in addition to festival admission). At the close of the pre-sale period, Waterloo Music Festival tickets will rise to $119 3-day GA passes and $249 3-day VIP passes, with car camping available with the purchase of an additional $49 camping vehicle pass.The inaugural Waterloo Music Festival—scheduled for September 7th through 9th at Austin, Texas’ Carson Creek Ranch—will announce the full music lineup and other key festival details in coming weeks. Fans can head over to the festival’s website here for more information and tickets.last_img read more

Patel highlights value of interfaith dialogue

first_imgEboo Patel, founder of Interfaith Youth Core, discussed the importance and implications of interfaith narrative and dialogue in a lecture titled “Interfaith Leadership: Engaging Religious and Non-Religious Diversity in the 21st Century.” The lecture was sponsored by Notre Dame’s Multicultural Student Programs and Services.Patel, who also serves as an member of the Inaugural Advisory Council for the White House Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships, said the need for coexistence and cooperation among various religions would become a defining question of our time.“The question of how people orient around religion differently, or interact with one another, whether that be based on conflict or cooperation, will be one of the most engaging questions of the 21st century,” he said.Patel said becoming an interfaith leader is a process that involves viewing one’s identity as a person of faith as an opportunity to create relationships among multiple communities of faith, which helps establish cooperation and dialogue.“You could look to make [your faith identity] a barrier of division, you could look to make it a bludgeon of domination or you could look to make it a bridge of cooperation,” Patel said.Patel said civil rights activist Martin Luther King, Jr., a Baptist, was an example of a successful interfaith leader because he took inspiration from the peaceful protests of Mahatma Gandhi, a Hindu, and cooperated with prominent leaders of multiple religions.“Martin Luther King is many, many things, but amongst them, he is certainly an interfaith leader,” Patel said.Patel said interfaith leadership is developed through three key experiences or “moments.” He said these moments include being inspired by a person or ideal of another faith, engaging and cooperating with people of multiple religions and observing and collaborating in solutions to combat interfaith violence.“You being inspired by an ideal or a person from a different religion; you recognizing and lifting up your memories of partnering with people of different religions whose endeavors are beautiful and great and holy; you recognizing the scourge of religious violence and thinking to yourself, ‘there has to be something done about this and I will take some responsibility’ — these are the kinds of moments that help you craft your own story of interfaith leadership,” Patel said.Patel said interfaith dialogue requires youth leaders who create inspiring and innovative discussion on faith. He focused on the concept of storytelling in the process of developing as an interfaith leader and said interfaith leaders “tell new stories to the world and embody those stories in their lives.”He said storytelling involves creating narratives and environments that are defined by similarities among, rather than by division of, people of different faiths.“Part of what leaders do is shape environments that make salient the commonalities between people from different religions,” Patel said.Tags: Eboo Patel, Gandhi, interfaith, interfaith dialogue, Martin Luther Kind, Multicultural Student Programs and Serviceslast_img read more

Ohio Energy Decisions ‘at a Boiling Point’

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享By Andy Chow for WOSU:Ohio’s largest energy companies are trying to figure out what they’re going to do with their coal power plants as they navigate through a vital time in the utilities industry. For the final installment of his three-part series, Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow explores the different paths those utilities can take and what that means for Ohioans who pay to keep the lights on.Many agree that the state of Ohio has reached a boiling point where the fate of coal, renewable energy and the regulatory framework itself must be decided.Businesses and energy companies think so.“It’s not on a front page it’s not something people will immediately understand, it’s geeky stuff,” said Sam Randazzo.“Quite frankly I think we’re at a crossroads,” Todd Snitchler added.Environmentalists think so.“We’re at an incredibly critical transition point,” said Dan Sawmiller.And legislators think so.“We’re at a point where all of those major issues remain undecided,” said Republican Senator Bill Seitz of Cincinnati.AEP and FirstEnergy had plans to keep their struggling coal plants afloat by adding an extra charge to customers’ electric bills. But that was essentially struck down by federal regulators.FirstEnergy is trying to find a new way to fund the plants while AEP has suggested selling off all its coal plants or try to go back to a regulated industry.Full story and audio for three part series here: http://radio.wosu.org/post/power-plant-your-electric-bill-critical-point-future-energy-ohio Ohio Energy Decisions ‘at a Boiling Point’last_img read more

The CUInsight Experience podcast: Lynette Smith – Willing to share (#26)

first_img 120SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Randall Smith Randall Smith is the co-founder of CUInsight.com, the host of The CUInsight Experience podcast, and a bit of a wanderlust.As one of the co-founders of CUInsight.com he … Web: www.CUInsight.com Details Welcome to episode 26 of The CUInsight Experience podcast. Hosted by Randy Smith, co-founder and publisher of CUInsight.com. Today’s guest is Lynette Smith the president and CEO of TruEnergy FCU and serves on the boards of the African American Credit Union Coalition and the Metropolitan Area Credit Union Management Association. We discuss rebranding and determining when it is necessary for a business. We also talk about the 2011 CEO of the Year Award she received from NAFCU for leading a smaller credit union and how to keep those smaller credit unions relevant in the current market.Lynette and I start off our conversation digging into the complete process of rebranding and all of the requirements you need to take into account. We discuss branding companies and their capabilities and distinctions. We also discuss the reason behind rebranding and the value that it brings when done appropriately. The undertaking is massive, but for True Energy FCU it was incredibly worth it.We then begin our discussion on the challenges smaller credit unions face while trying to stay relevant in today’s market. Lynette believes the biggest challenges are found in keeping up with compliance and technology. While there is admittedly value in updating technology, it is difficult to support the initial costs. In addition, we talk about the importance of credit union associations and the connections you make when you get involved. Listen to this episode if rebranding is in your future. The information and insights Lynette shares are invaluable in understanding the requirements and the process. We also discuss keeping smaller credit unions relevant in today’s market. You won’t want to miss this!Subscribe on: Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, StitcherHow to find Lynette:Lynette SmithPresident & CEO of TruEnergy [email protected] | Twitter | FacebookShow notes from this episode:Shout out: Simon & AssociatesOrganizations mentioned: African American Credit Union Coalition,  Metropolitan Area Credit Union Management Association, NAFCUInternships mentioned: AACUC Summer Internship ProgramConferences mentioned: AACUC ConferenceAlbum mentioned: Anthony Hamilton’s songsBook mentioned: Managing and Leading Well by Dan Berger and Anthony DemangoneBook mentioned: The BibleShout out: Martin Luther King Jr. and Mohammad AliPrevious guests mentioned in this episode: Dan Berger, Maurice Smith, Doug LeightonYou can find all past episodes of The CUInsight Experience here.In This Episode:[00:03] – Welcome back to the show! Randy introduces Lynette Smith, today’s guest.[02:26] – We dive into the rebranding of TruEnergy FCU and the reason behind it.[03:49] – Lynette talks about the process of rebranding in detail, from hiring a branding team to notifying the board.[06:07] – The person responsible for coordinating the rebranding was their COO.[06:50] – They were not able to use the same marketing firm for the branding change versus branding awareness.[10:53] – Lynette discusses the beauty of the FAQ page they created and how it helped their customers.[11:27] – We switch gears and discuss the challenges that the smaller credit unions face.[12:23] – The biggest problem is keeping up with compliance and technology.[13:06] – Can technology help the small credit unions?[14:42] – Handling cyber threats and salary structures are also huge problems.[15:44] – As a leader and CEO do you sell the idea that you can learn many skills?[16:54] – We discuss the shrinking credit union industry and ways it can be fixed.[22:27] – Leaders need to see a failing credit union before NCUA requires it be addressed.[25:24] – Lynette discusses the African American Credit Union Coalition and it’s importance in the industry.[28:14] – Mentorship is a key foundation of the AACUC as is the internship program.[34:35] – What inspired Lynette to take the role as CEO and President of Washington Gas Light FCU?[36:32] – Has the inspiration change now that she has reached the role?[37:42] – Lynette describes how she leads with inspiration and listening.[39:00] – How has her leadership style changed with experience and changing roles?[40:10] – It’s okay to make mistakes from time to time as long as you admit it and correct it.[41:46] – We discuss the big mistake people make when they are new to leadership.[43:59] – The advice she took to heart as a child is to treat people right. Be open and honest with them.[44:57] – Lynette talks about her network and how they help support her.[46:50] – Lynette looks forward to spending time with family and friends and she likes to travel.[48:26] – We start into the rapid-fire question discussing Lynette’s daily routine.[49:45] – Best album of all time? She talks about Anthony Hamilton and her favorite genres.[50:36] – Lynette admits she doesn’t read much but she enjoyed Managing and Lead Well as well as the Bible.[51:39] – What has become more and less important as Lynette has gotten older?[53:33] – Martin Luther King Jr. embodies success for Lynette.[54:29] – Leaders need to take care of themselves first and then taking care of others becomes an easy task. last_img read more

Yves Béhar FORME Life connected fitness mirror has a built-in weight training system

first_img– Advertisement – Get a complete exercise experience at home with the Yves Béhar FORME Life connected fitness mirror. Offering a built-in weight training system, this home fitness system encompasses all you need to break a sweat. It does so with its hidden resistance system that actually simulates weight. Whether you want to push, pull, or lift, you can do so. This gorgeous piece of equipment blends right into your home. That’s because, when you aren’t using it, its arms fold up and fit behind the smart mirror. Additionally, this smart mirror incorporates a heart rate monitor and ankle strap for even more abilities. Because it stands a full six feet tall, this connected fitness mirror actually displays instructors in almost life size. You’ll feel like you’re getting a one-on-one real-time training session.last_img read more

Port Nelson Raises the Bar

first_imgThe $20m redevelopment of the Port Nelson’s Main Wharf North is set create long lasting regional economic benefits and future-proof the region’s import and export sectors, Port Nelson said in their latest announcement. General Manager Infrastructure, Allanagh Rivers, said that the Port’s investment will also improve the Port’s resilience, move main wharf operations further away from residential neighbors and enable the Port to accommodate larger vessels.“Once completed, the new section of the main wharf will assist in enabling the Port to attract larger 260 to 270 meter vessels and 300 meter cruise vessels creating growth opportunities for our importers, exporters and the Community,” said Ms Rivers.The existing 2400m² Main Wharf North has deteriorated with age. The wharf was used predominantly for the discharging of fuel vessels, and the tying up of the non-operational vessels.“With the condition of the wharf deteriorating and the importance of a fuel supply, the fuel berth was relocated to Main Wharf South in 2016. Since then Main Wharf North has had no operational function.”“The Port is committed to being a good neighbor and this redevelopment will help mitigate and reduce the effects of noise generated from Port operations. The additional footprint on the main wharf means ships can be berthed further north and further away from residential properties,” added Ms Rivers.“The redevelopment of the Main Wharf North also forms part of a wider program of works including the purchase of a new 70-ton bollard pull tug, future crane replacement and proposed additional dredging of the harbor channel.”The first phase of the project will be to demolish the century old wharf before replacing it with a concrete and steel berthing facility.The new section of the wharf will be operational by late 2020.last_img read more