Little Silver Seniors’ Club Ending After Nearly 20 Years

first_imgBy Greg Scharen Linda Rizzo, a membersince 2003, was in charge ofhospitality, organizing thefood, beverages and locationsfor the club’s luncheons, acrucial role. Hosting live music and entertainment each week, the club provided a community for people of a certain age to interact with one another, meeting in the Little Silver Borough Hall and Women’s Club. The seniors’ club also hosted luncheons and boat trips throughout the years and focused on service to the community, working with Lunch Break in Red Bank and other organizations to help build a community outside of their own. Seniors of Little Silverstarted out small but grew to72 members at its high point.It then shrank to 42 membersand had a hard time fillingthe governing board seats. The independent social club is disbanding due to lack of support and the advancing age of many integral members, said Symons. “I’m heartbroken,” said Louise Symons, an active club member, echoing similar sentiments of others involved in the club, as they move on from this venture. center_img Symons wanted to thankall of the current and pastmembers of Seniors of LittleSilver for their dedication. After 19 years, the Seniors of Little Silver is ending its run. The club’s final luncheon will be held at noon June 25 at the Molly Pitcher Inn in Red Bank. The club was funded through member dues each year and a variety of 50/50 raffles held throughout the years, but suffered from a lack of identity since membership was open to people residing outside Little Silver. The club began in 2000 with adjunct founder Julia Aymonier and 18 senior residents of Little Silver. Joining later were Symons, Diane Tresente, Rene O’Neil and the senior’s first president Ann Hansen, all of whom have been a driving force in keeping the club going. last_img read more

Local triathlete Steve Archdekin featured in British magazine

first_imgThe article touched on various parts of Archdekin’s life on, and off, the triathlon circuit.A key part of the story was information regarding his run-in with a goat — an attack that kept him off the triathlon circuit for some time.But while it was good for Archdekin to see his name in print, on glossy paper, he’s got a bigger goal. A goal he hopes the article opens a few doors for sponsors.“I hope this story builds some momentum,” said Archdekin, who hopes to run a triathlon every week at stops around the world over a two-year period to raise money for a charity he started called International Triathlon for Kids.The goal is to raise funds and awareness for the children’s charities.“It doesn’t take much for me to open my mouth once I start racing,” he adds. “People seem to pay attention once I get started.”Unfortunately for Archdekin, if he didn’t have bad luck he’d have no luck at all.After healing from the goat attack, he was close to returning to action this season when he was hit with food poisoning and was bed-ridden for some time.But he finally got back into the water, hopped on his bike and ran the five-kilometers during the recent Christina Lake race.“I looked at this race, even with all the controversy I was dealing with, (Christina Lake) would be a good, kick in the pants, kick start for me to get my brain wrapped around racing again,” said Archdekin.“So now I just have to deal with moving again and I’ll be in town where I’ll be right near the water and I can get back training again.”While most people have a few aches and pains following a triathlon, Archdekin lives with those same aches and pains daily.Despite the hardship, he lives for his goal to raise money for his charity.“It’s do this or die. Whatever comes first . . . literally,” Archdekin admits.“This is what I’m doing so my body will collapse again. I get windows of opportunity, and when I get them, I dive through them.”Archdekin hopes to use this triathlon season to rebuild and repair his body in preparation for the big world-wind tour beginning, September of 2013.Then everyone will see Archdekin make that grand entrance. Steve Archdekin likes to make a grand entrance when he competes at triathlon races — not.But the British Columbian transplant is definitely making a splash on the world triathlon scene after having a story published about him in the British magazine Triathlon Plus.“It was a good article, so I’m glad about that,” Archdekin told The Nelson Daily about the article titled, “Making a Difference”.“I was also psyched that I got to be in the magazine with Lance (Armstrong) on the cover.”It’s been well documented in local media the plight of the Brampton, Ont., native.In September of 1993, the eighth to be exact, Archdekin caught, what he thought, was a bought of the common cold.Little did he know was this common cold turned into a full-blown case of rare form of arthritis called, Reiter’s Syndrome — a form of arthritis that produces pain, swelling, redness, and heat in the joints.However, instead of letting the disease get the better of him, Archdekin decided to forget about all his aches and pains and live life.And living life is competing in as many triathlons as his body allows.Which was well written in the summer edition of Triathlon Plus.“I liked that the article was pretty accurate and said some things that I’ve never really talked about,” Archdekin explained.“Simple things like (a person with my conditions) clothes can hurt my skin if I come into contact with them which is why I wear shorts in the winter.”“I like where the story is located in the magazine and I like that (publishers) used Phil (Best’s) photos, that they’re in there because he’s been good to me and always helped me out,” he adds.Archdekin story is part of the “share a story with us” segment of the magazine where publishers encourage readers to submit ideas.last_img read more

Kootenay Ice outlast South Island to get back into win column

first_imgCoy Prevost of Kimberley, Amour, Klimchuk, Mitch Titus of Montrose and Nelson’s Sawyer Hunt scored for Kootenay which held periods leads of 2-1 and 3-1.Saturday South Island scored twice in the final 40 minutes to edge Kootenay 4-2.Kyle Chernenoff of Crescent Valley and Prevost scored in the first period as the teams played to a 2-2 tie.South Island took the lead for good with a second period goal before icing the game with a third period insurance marker.The Ice host the Cariboo Cougars of Prince George Saturday at 12:30 p.m. in the NDCC Arena.Sunday the teams play in the Civic Arena. Puck drop is 10:15 a.m. The Kootenay Ice have suffered their share of losses this BC Hockey Major Midget League season.But the Ice can boast a better record than a season ago after outlasting South Island Royals 5-4 Sunday in Major Midget action Sunday in Victoria.Trail’s Ross Armour, Kadrian Klimchuk of Castlegar and Austin Tambellini of Nelson each finished with two points to lead the Ice to the narrow victory.Kootenay now sports a 4-21-5 record for 13 points.last_img read more