Several Benefit from Ecobank Christmas Gesture

first_imgSeveral organizations including the Christian Association of the Blind, Fatima Cottage Orphanage Mission in the Township of Dixville and the Old Folks’ Home in Jacobs Town have benefited from Ecobank’s Christmas donation during the festive season. The donation, which was spearheaded by Gibson Kollie, head of domestic banking, included bags of rice, toiletries, cooking oil and cartons of fish. “It is a tradition of Ecobank Liberia that at the end of every year we identify with the less fortunate and other vulnerable persons during the festive season,” Mr. Kollie said. “Our managing director, Mr. Gilles Guarard, wants you to have a good festive season. This is why he instructed me to come and bring you these items,” Mr. Kollie told the beneficiaries. In their responses, the beneficiaries, including Mother Victoria B. Young, founder of Fatima Cottage Orphanage, Beyan Kotta of CAR and others lauded Ecobank Liberia for its donations to meet the needs of ordinary Liberians.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Hunter’s long hair will cover another head

first_imgCASTAIC – Some of the kids at school teased him and called him names, and a teacher told him he needed to cut his hair. But 13-year-old Hunter Young didn’t care what anyone thought because he was on a mission in his brother’s name: to grow his blond hair long enough to donate it to Locks of Love, a charity that makes hairpieces for patients who have lost their own tresses. “I once saw this kid at school who was bald,” Hunter said. “I asked him why he didn’t have any hair and he said he had cancer and had to have chemo and lost his hair. Then I heard about Locks of Love on TV and I thought maybe I could grow mine and give it to the kid.” It took two years, but on Wednesday, Hunter’s mission was accomplished when his mom took shears and cut 13 inches of hair from her son’s head – 3 inches more than Locks of Love requires. “He has the most beautiful blond hair. It looks like silk,” Hunter’s mom, Penny Young, said Friday. Locks of Love is a a nonprofit organization that uses donations of real hair to create hair prosthetics for children who have lost their hair due to illness, often from chemotherapy. Hunter asked his mom if boys ever donated. “I told him they did, and he immediately said he wanted to grow his hair out and do that,” Young said. Hunter was motivated by the experience of his older brother, Michael, 23, who suffers from Hodgkin’s lymphoma and lost his hair a few years ago while undergoing treatment. Michael has been in and out of remission since he was 16, and while at one point he wasn’t expected to live, he’s now doing well. “Hunter saw Michael lose all his hair. Hunter has seen quite a few challenges that affect our family, which makes him a little different from other kids,” Young said. Hunter’s two sisters, Rachelle, 25, and Kayla, 18, both have heart problems and Rachelle underwent open-heart surgery when she was 16. Older brother Travis, 16, was born with cystic fibrosis and is a quadriplegic. Hunter and 22-year-old Sean are both healthy. “Hunter, being the youngest and seeing all this has made him who he is,” Young said. “He’s got a very tender heart. I think he notices things like handicaps more because of what he’s been through. He just has a sweet, big heart.” When Hunter walked into class at Thursday morning, one of his teachers – all were supportive after learning his story – told him he was in the wrong class. She didn’t recognize him. “Yes, he’s very bald now,” Young said. “When I looked in the mirror, I was so surprised,” Hunter said. He found long hair a hassle, blowing in his face when he rode his scooter. But Hunter said he would do it again. And his classmate? “Before I could donate it, he got a new wig. But I thought, `Hey, I can do it for someone else. I’m glad it will go to someone.” Those interested in donating hair to Locks of Love can visit www.locksoflove.org for information. It is estimated that 80 percent of donations come from children who want to help other children. sharon.cotal@dailynews.com (661) 257-5256 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img