McPartland Joins Drake University Volleyball Coaching Staff

first_imgDES MOINES, Iowa – Mitchell McPartland has been hired as an assistant coach on the Drake University volleyball coaching staff, head coach Darrin McBroom announced Wednesday, July 13.”I’m incredibly excited to join Darrin and Leslie [Flores-Cloud] and learn from two experienced coaches at the collegiate level,” McPartland said. “I’m looking forward to helping bring Drake to the top of the Missouri Valley Conference. I am thankful for Darrin for giving me the opportunity to pursue my goal of coaching women’s college volleyball.”McPartland, a recent Grand View University graduate and native of Boone, Iowa, brings extensive collegiate playing and coaching experience to the Bulldog bench.”I am really excited to have Mitchell join our staff and I think he will be a great fit for our program,” McBroom said. “He brings solid experience to our program and he comes from a volleyball family.  He has a wealth of experience in almost every phase of the game from playing an offensive role for his collegiate team and being an all-conference libero.  I think this diversity of skill sets will allow us to utilize him in a variety of capacities and he is committed to putting in the time that it takes to become successful in this field.”McPartland was a four-year starter on the Grand View men’s volleyball team and helped lead the program to NAIA national runner-up honors in 2016. Prior to that, the team finished third in back-to-back seasons with McPartland being honored as the NAIA North Division Libero of the Year in 2014. He was also a three-time academic all-conference selection.While competing, McPartland also began his coaching career as Grand View’s women’s junior varsity head coach and assistant varsity coach during the 2015 season. In that role, he guided the JV team to a 23-14 record and claimed the Heart of America Athletic Conference JV tournament title. In his role with the varsity team, he worked primarily with the team’s defensive specialists.In 2014, he served as an assistant coach with the girls’ volleyball team at Boone High School and helped coach the program to a 33-7 record and the team’s first appearance in a Class 4A regional final for the first time in a decade. He also gained experience as a staff member at Iowa State’s summer volleyball camps.In addition to his collegiate and high school coaching experience, McPratland has a deep background in coaching at the club level. He is currently the head coach of the Iowa Power Volleyball Alliance’s 16-1 team and previously served as a coach for the All Iowa Attack Volleyball Club and Johnston Volleyball Club.McPartland received his bachelor’s degree in health promotion with a focus in wellness from Grand View in May of 2016, graduating magna cum laude. He was a member of the President’s list and a six-time Dean’s List honoree.Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

QPR linked with City defender

first_imgQPR could be interested in signing Marko Marin on loan from Chelsea, German newspaper Bild have reported.Rangers have also been linked with a move for Manchester City’s England defender Joleon Lescott.City are looking to offload Lescott when the transfer window opens, according to The Sun.It is claimed that his former club Everton are interested but his wages – reported to be £90,000 per week – could be a problem for them and that this could open the door for Rangers.Loftus Road boss Harry Redknapp is keen to sign at least one centre-back in January.And the Daily Mail report that Redknapp has launched a bid to sign West Ham midfielder Mohamed Diame.This page is regularly updated.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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

What You Are Not Being Told About Earth’s Magnetic Field

first_imgAll you need to know is right here: (1) scientists don’t understand it, and (2) without it we would be dead. Read more if you dare.In New Scientist‘s piece, “The paradox powering earth’s magnetic field,” Marcus Woo knows that we rely on our magnetic field:IT IS Earth’s silent defender. Without it, a constant onslaught of charged particles would bombard our planet’s atmosphere, changing its chemistry and disrupting our electronic infrastructure. Assuming any of that stuff was even there to disrupt. In Earth’s infancy, our guardian may have prevented the sun’s action from stripping away the protective bubble of gas surrounding our planet entirely, and so allowed life – and eventually intelligent life – to flourish.But then Woo reveals a tale of scientific nakedness covered by fig leaves. First, the fig leaves:This silent defender is Earth’s magnetic field, a force field whose source lies in the churning molten iron that forms the planet’s core. Electrons flowing through this fluid generate an electric current, which in turn creates a magnetic field. The core is a giant, self-sustaining electromagnet: a dynamo.Now, the unveiling:That’s been the general story for decades. But over the last few years, it has run into a problem. Evidence is mounting that the dynamo could only have emerged comparatively recently. At the same time, geological clues show that the magnetic field has existed for most of Earth’s 4.5-billion-year history. This contradiction – an ancient magnetic field without anything to power it – is forcing us to rethink our planet’s insides.Not a pretty sight. No dynamo? That’s dynamite.Marcus Woo is a moyboy, of course, not questioning the consensus age of the earth. Now, however, the moyboy position leads to a contradiction. What to do? Geophysicists need a dynamo tale for their billions of years, but can’t find a place to plug it in. What powers the convection that’s supposed to generate the field?So it seems that one way or another, the dynamo has been kept turning for most of Earth’s history. But it’s here we encounter the most recent twist in this magnetic tale. In the past few years, researchers have begun to doubt whether the first part of the story, thermal convection, could ever have happened – and if it did, whether it would have been strong enough to power the magnetic field. “If you want to rely on thermal convection alone, then we’re in trouble,” says David Stevenson at the California Institute of Technology.The fig leaves came off recently. Woo quotes Francis Nimmo: “Five years ago, everyone thought they knew the answer.” Under the best theoretical models, the dynamo could not have gotten jumpstarted till a billion years ago, billions of years after the earth’s emergence as a planet. But without it running from the beginning, life would have cooked under an atmosphere doing a striptease in the hot sun.Woo doesn’t want to leave the models naked. He brings in some tailors. One guy dresses the model with magnesium; another, with silicon. Others try entertainment till some covering arrives. Ever seen the Wobble Dance? The Jostle Dance? They sound lun-ey if not risque.Some researchers have even suggested that convection may not drive the dynamo at all. Instead, Earth’s wobbling rotation could jostle the molten iron. Or the moon’s gravity could tug the liquid core in the same way it causes ocean tides. “There’s a group of people that are enthusiastic about the idea, but I would say it’s probably not mainstream,” says Bruce Buffet at the University of California, Berkeley.For now, “everything’s up in the air,” Woo laments. Even the fig leaves. Try not to think about it.At the moment, everything’s up in the air. Even the thermal conductivity calculations could be wrong. In fact, a study contradicting Hirose’s measurements ran alongside his in the same scientific journal. “This is a fast-moving field,” Nimmo says. “I don’t think we have a completely satisfactory answer.”And you thought the tale of the Earth’s magnetic field was as elegant as Melanie Trump’s inauguration gown by Ralph Lauren. Sorry; that was only the textbook drawing for the TV animators. The real tailors are threadbare, leaving their critics in stitches.And that’s what you are not being told. The secular geophysicists can’t power the magnetic field or keep it going, and they can’t live without it. All these problems ensue because they’re moyboys. Take away the requirement for millions and billions of years: problem (1) solved. Think of it as intelligently designed for human life: problem (2) solved. So what’s the problem? Not evidence, but worldview commitment. (Visited 216 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Greenhouse management workshop

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio State University’s 2019 Greenhouse Management Workshop, set for Jan. 17-18 in Wooster, will dig all around a plant’s roots. The theme is “Root Zone Optimization.”Peter Ling, associate professor in Ohio State’s Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, said this year’s program is unique because it will focus exclusively on the root zone.Ling has organized the annual workshop, which is designed for commercial growers from Ohio and beyond, for each of its now 21 years.Chieri Kubota, professor in Ohio State’s Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, said root zone optimization means surrounding a plant’s roots with the best possible chemical, physical and biological conditions — the ideal nutrients, moisture and more.Doing so, she said, helps plants grow faster and tolerate pests and diseases better, which for a greenhouse grower can translate into lower costs, higher yields and greater income.Since greenhouse growers typically grow their plants in small containers, troughs or water culture (hydroponics), “managing the root zone is essential,” Kubota said.If plants aren’t getting what they need, she said, “they can’t move like we do.”The workshop will have 16 technical talks in all, grouped into general sessions on fundamentals and biostimulants and concurrent sessions on container culture of ornamentals and hydroponic and soil-less culture of food crops.Lettuce, basil and high-wire crops such as cucumbers will be among the food crops covered.Topics will also include composts, substrates, nutrition, fertigation and beneficial microbes, to name a few.There will be tours of a commercial greenhouse and of research facilities and greenhouses on the Wooster campus of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).The campus, made up of the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) and the Ohio State University Agricultural Technical Institute, is the location of the workshop.About a dozen experts from industry, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and CFAES, Ling and Kubota among them, will serve as speakers for the talks. Ling’s and Kubota’s home departments are both part of CFAES.More information on the event, including session topics and speakers plus details on registration and lodging, is available at go.osu.edu/GHM19.Sessions will be held in OARDC’s Fisher Auditorium, 1680 Madison Ave., on the CFAES Wooster campus.Registration to attend in person is $150 by Jan. 4 and $175 after Jan. 4. The cost includes all sessions, tours, and continental breakfast and lunch both days. Lodging is extra.Registration to attend as a remote participant by webinar is $100 by Jan. 4 and $125 after Jan. 4. The cost includes the general session and a concurrent session on each of the event’s two days.Online registration is available at go.osu.edu/greenhouse19. A mailable registration form can be found at go.osu.edu/GHM19.Participants will be eligible for Indiana State Chemist continuing certification credit in Category 1, Agricultural Pest Management (6 hours); Category 3A, Ornamental Pest Management (5 hours); Category 14, Agricultural Fertilizer Application (1 hour); and Category RT, Registered Technician (4 hours).Participants can also earn continuing education credits from the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development in Category 3B for both Commercial Core and Private Core (10 hours).For more information, contact Mary Wicks, wicks.14@osu.edu, 330-202-3533, or go to fabe.osu.edu/greenhouse.last_img read more

Twitter Redesigns As Streaming Trends Site

first_imgTwitter just announced its new home page redesign complete with trending topics and search. Publicly launched at the 2006 South by South West interactive festival, users first flocked to the site as a way to communicate with friends and festival attendees. However, as we’ve seen in the past few years, the site has evolved into a multifaceted real-time tool. The community has given timely updates on earthquakes, the Iran election and we’ve even seen professional poker players bluff in real-time Tweets. Twitter has evolved into a community where users can discover breaking news and trends and the new home page certainly matches that. Says Twitter cofounder Biz Stone in a blog post , “Demonstrating the power of Twitter as a discovery engine for what is happening right now through our Search and Trends often awakens a sense of wonder which inevitably leads to a much more compelling question, “How do I get involved?”And it seems at this point, if you haven’t gotten involved you’ve been living under a rock. While the site always contained the ability to search and discover trends, these features were buried. Today, with the new design, all of those television viewers who refused to give into the peer pressure of Oprah and Ashton Kutcher’s hour-long Twitter tutorial will finally understand the value of the service. Twitter isn’t just an emotional weather report generator, it’s a taste of zeitgeist. In some cases, the spirit of our times is simply our lust to win an iPhone in a Twitter sweepstakes or our willingness to spam our friends with Spymaster, and in other cases it is breaking news about the events, companies and issues that effect our lives. One of the interesting aspects of the new trends section is that unlike real-time search engine One Riot, Twitter not only offers the list of related-tweets, but it also offers a short rationale for a topic’s popularity. This contextualization makes it particularly useful for news discovery. Those who’ve abandoned their Twitter accounts might point to the frivolity of some of the home page’s current trending topics; however, Twitter’s ebb and flow is only as silly or intelligent as our society dictates. When the President of the United States encourages you to tweet your senator to support health insurance reform, you know you should probably continue to keep an eye on this micro blogging superstar. dana oshiro The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Related Posts center_img Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Tags:#twitter#web A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

Opposition threatens stir over alleged fake encounter

first_imgNagpur: Opposition parties in Chhattisgarh have threatened to go on protest if the government fails to order a probe into the alleged extrajudicial killing of two tribals by the police. The incident took place in the Maoist-infested Bastar region near Purungal-Dokapara on January 29. The spot is located near the Dantewada-Bijapur district border.The State police has claimed that two Maoists, identified as Bhima Kadati and Sukmati Hemla, were killed in the encounter and weapons including a rifle were recovered from them.The villagers approached tribal activist and AAP leader Soni Sori and other political parties for support, and have refused to bury the bodies. “Hemla was Kadati’s sister-in-law. They were returning after meeting Kadati’s brother Baman in Kirandul town on January 28 when they were picked up by the security forces. They were killed on January 29. The villagers told me that neither had Maoist connections. The condition of Hemla’s body suggests she may have been raped before being killed,” Ms. Sori told The Hindu.‘Police putting pressure’Ms. Sori alleged the police is trying to destroy evidence by burying the bodies. “The villagers have protected the bodies for over 20 days, but security forces are trying to compel villagers into burying them.” The Congress, led by Dantewada MLA Devati Karma, extended support to the villagers’ protest and appointed a team to probe the matter. Former Chief Minister Ajit Jogi’s Chhattisgarh Janata Congress (CJC) has already begun protests over the issue. Mr. Jogi led a protest march to Chief Minister Raman Singh’s residence in Raipur on Saturday, accompanied by relatives of the deceased. They demanded a second post-mortem and a judicial probe. Mr. Jogi’s son and Marwahi MLA Amit Jogi has already threatened to perform the last rites in front of the Chief Minister’s residence in Raipur if the police personnel responsible are not arrested. AAP leader Sanket Thakur said he is accompanying the victims’ relatives to Bilaspur to file a case in the high court. Mr.Jogi has also said he would move the HC over the issue.SP (Dantewada) Kamlochan Kashyap denied the allegations. “An encounter had happened on January 29 in which two Maoists were killed. Both were Maoists and a part of senior Maoist leader Ganesh Uike’s supply team. They had a number of cases registered against them in various police stations of Bastar. Post-mortems were conducted on both bodies, and they were buried on January 30. However, some elements asked the villagers to exhume them. We can’t do much about the politics being played over this incident,” he said.last_img read more

T20 World Cup: West Indies knock out New Zealand in Super Over

first_imgA spirited West Indies kept alive their semi-final hopes after pulling off a sensational win over New Zealand via Super Over in their final Super Eights match of the ICC World Twenty20 here today.Needing 18 to win in the Super Over, West Indies rode on Chris Gayle and Marlon’s Samuels pyrotechnics to finish the game with a ball to spare at the Pallekele International Cricket Stadium which saw a tied game with both teams finishing on 139 in regulation time.While Gayle started the chase in the Super Over with a huge six over long-off off a no ball by Tim Southee, Sameuls completed the job with a maximum over deep mid-wicket.With three loses from as many games, New Zealand have crashed out of the tournament.The game went into the Super Over after New Zealand made heavy weather of a modest 140-run chase.Ross Taylor, who gave New Zealand hope with his aggressive batting in the Super Over, played a captain’s knock but his unbeaten 62 went in vain as chasing 140, New Zealand managed 139 for seven in their alloted 20 overs.Sunil Narine shone with the ball for West Indies with figures of three for 20 from his four overs, which included the penultimate over of the New Zealand innings in which the off-spinner conceded just three runs besides picking up a wicket.Earlier, pacers Doug Bracewell and Tim Southee came up with superb bowling efforts to help New Zealand bundle out West Indies for a lowly 139.New Zealand’s decision to field first produced the desired result as the Kiwi bowlers managed to frustrate the opposition batsmen throughout. Southee (3/21) and Bracewell (3/31) claimed three wickets each, while Nathan MuCullum took two for 19 to end Windies’ innings in 19.3 overs.advertisementlast_img read more

Strains

first_imgDefinitionA strain is when a muscle is stretched too much and tears. It is also called a pulled muscle. A strain is a painful injury. It can be caused by an accident,overusing a muscle, or using a muscle inthe wrong way.Alternative NamesPulled muscleCausesA strain may be caused by:Too muchphysical activity or effortImproperly warming up before a physical activityPoor flexibilitySymptomsSymptoms of a strain can include:Pain and difficulty moving the injured muscleDiscolored and bruised skinSwellingFirst AidApply icerightawayto reduce swelling. Wrap the ice in cloth. Do not placeice directly on the skin. Apply ice for 10 to 15 minutes every 1 hour for the first day and every 3 to 4 hours after that.Use ice for the first 3 days. Either heat or ice may be helpful after that if you still have pain.Rest the pulled muscle for at least a day. If possible, keep the pulled muscle raised about your heart.Try not to use a strained muscle while it is still painful. When the pain starts to go away, you can slowly increase activity.When to get medical assistanceCall your local emergency number, such as 911, if:You are unable to move the muscle.The injury is bleeding.Call your health care provider if the pain does not go away after several weeks.PreventionThe following tips may help you reduce your risk of a strain:Warm-up properly before exercise and sports.Keep your muscles strong and flexible.ReferencesBiundo JJ. Bursitis, tendinitis, and other periarticular disorders and sports medicine. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman’s Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 271.advertisementBrinker MR, O’Connor DP, Almekinders LC, et al. Physiology of Injury to Musculoskeletal Structures: 1. Muscle and Tendon Injury. In: DeLee JC, Drez D Jr, Miller MD, eds. DeLee and Drez’s Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2009:chap 1, section A.Review Date:4/13/2013Reviewed By:Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.last_img read more