Dan Camp, Who Created a Mississippi Jewel, Dies at 79

first_img“Most people in the community thought I was crazy for going into such a dilapidated slum area to do anything like this,” he told Mississippi Public Broadcasting in 2013.Over the years he added small cottages — 300 to 500 square feet, aimed at students — and assorted other residential units, as well as stores, restaurants, bars and public spaces, all of it on narrow streets that encouraged foot traffic and a communal feel. The district was built on the principles of the 1980s movement known as New Urbanism but came into being well before that term had been coined.“Mayor Camp talked about walkability and mixed-use development before it was cool,” Parker Wiseman, his successor as mayor, said on Twitter. “He didn’t just talk about it. He built it.” After that, Mr. Roy said, Mr. Camp kept giving him commissions just to support his art.“At any given time he might also be patron to a writer, a sculptor, a wild impressionist, a barefoot juggler, a lost intellectual or an ethically sourced hippie apparel shop,” he said. “He wanted a carousel of creatives in the neighborhood by design.”In addition to his son Robert, Mr. Camp is survived by his wife, Gemma, whom he married in 1981; another son, Frederick, known as Bonn; and two granddaughters. In 1969, Mr. Camp started buying property in that area and creating an eclectic oasis of tightly packed housing and businesses that has been drawing admiration from urban planners ever since. The Cotton District is now one of the most desirable addresses in Starkville, especially for students, a pedestrian-friendly, architecturally varied neighborhood of cottages, duplexes, apartments, street-level shops, courtyards and fountains. – Advertisement – Mr. Camp, who served a term as Starkville mayor from 2005 to 2009, died on Oct. 25 in Meridian, Miss. He was 79. His son Robert said the cause was complications of Covid-19.Robert Daniel Camp was born on April 13, 1941, in Baton Rouge, La., and raised in Tupelo, Miss. His father, Dewey, was a band director, and his mother, Opal Quay (Webb) Camp, was an educator who, the family said, was Elvis Presley’s sixth-grade home room teacher.Mr. Camp graduated from Tupelo High School in 1959, earned a bachelor’s degree in education at Mississippi State in 1963 and received at master’s degree in education at North Carolina State in 1967 before returning to Starkville. He started the Cotton District reinvention with eight small townhouses. – Advertisement –center_img This obituary is part of a series about people who have died in the coronavirus pandemic. Read about others here.When Dan Camp was in graduate school at North Carolina State University in Raleigh in the mid-1960s, a historic building caught his eye. It was a cottage where, at least according to local lore, President Andrew Johnson was born. What struck Mr. Camp was that a relatively compact space could be a perfectly adequate dwelling.- Advertisement – “I suspected that most Americans lived in that type of environment then,” he told Mississippi Magazine in 2001, “so I came home with the idea that those types of dwellings would be an excellent way to build things and offer them to students.”Back home in Mississippi, he settled in Starkville, about 125 miles northeast of Jackson, and became intrigued with the possibilities of a run-down area between the campus of Mississippi State University, where he was teaching in the industrial education department, and the downtown section that became known as the Cotton District, because of the mill that once thrived there. The mill had shut down in 1964, and the nearby millworker housing had deteriorated. “He hired me to paint a mural on his office about 10 minutes after meeting me in early 2014,” Mr. Roy said. “This was in spite of me having no paid experience, no knowledge of how to run a scissor lift and no proper sketch. He liked that the old folks across town hated my work.” – Advertisement –last_img read more

Hamilton sweeps to dominant Belgian F1 win

first_imgBy Abhishek Takle(REUTERS) – Lewis Hamilton took another step towards a record-equalling seventh Formula One title on Sunday with a dominant lights-to-flag victory in the Belgian Grand Prix.The Briton, who had started from pole position after an inspired qualifying display, was at the front for every single lap as he led team mate Valtteri Bottas across the line for a Mercedes one-two.Hamilton looked to be in perfect control in the lead after retaining his advantage at the start and down the long flat-out blast to the Les Combes chicane despite a snap of oversteer.The durability of his tyres, which stirred memories of his winning three-wheeled limp to the line at his home British Grand Prix, raised some concern for the champion.But even those worries, which injected a hint of jeopardy into the otherwise straightforward race, proved unfounded as he crossed the line a comfortable 8.4 seconds clear of his Finnish stablemate.“I know it’s not necessarily what everybody always wants to see, a Mercedes at the front,” said Hamilton, who now has a 50-point lead in the championship over Bottas and is 47 ahead of Red Bull’s third-placed finisher Max Verstappen.“But no matter how much success we have, we just keep our heads down.”Hamilton’s win was the 89th of his career, putting him ever closer to matching Michael Schumacher’s seven title triumphs and leaving him just two short of the German’s record tally of 91 race victories.It was also the champion’s fifth win from seven races so far this season and the fourth of his career on the Spa-Francorchamps track.Bottas, winner of the season-opening Austrian Grand Prix but now effectively two whole race victories behind Hamilton, said: “I think Lewis was faultless today.”“PRETTY BORING” Verstappen, the only non-Mercedes winner so far this year, took his sixth consecutive podium but dubbed the race “boring.”“I ran out of tyres at the end, so I was just stretching it out, saving the front tyres,” said the 22-year-old, who had a lonely afternoon after a first-lap battle with former team mate Daniel Ricciardo.“It was not enjoyable out there today.”Ricciardo finished fourth for Renault, while also taking the extra point for fastest lap. Team mate Esteban Ocon rounded off a strong weekend for the French manufacturer by snatching fifth on the last lap from Red Bull’s Alexander Albon.Lando Norris, the sole McLaren in the race after team mate Carlos Sainz failed to make the start due to an exhaust issue, was seventh while Alpha Tauri’s Pierre Gasly took ‘Driver of the Day’ honours in eighth.FERRARI STRUGGLE Ferrari, winners in Belgium for the last two years, finished out of the points as their lack of speed was laid bare on Spa’s long straights.Sebastian Vettel, leaving Ferrari at the end of the year, was 13th, a place ahead of last year’s pole-sitter and winner Charles Leclerc, whose race was further hampered by slow pitstops.“We need to work and find something because like this it’s very difficult,” Leclerc said of the Italian team’s form that even drew a shake of the head from Vettel’s replacement Sainz.The race was interrupted by an early safety car, sent out after a crash involving Antonio Giovinazzi and George Russell.The Italian lost control of his Alfa Romeo at the exit of the Fagnes chicane.Russell, running behind Giovinazzi in his Williams, collected a loose wheel that came off the car, leaving debris strewn across the track.last_img read more

Hurricane Maria – A Personal Story

first_imgAuthor Scott Smith is the editor of ConsumersAdvocate.org.  As a former trader on Wall Street living in NYC during 9/11, and now an editor living in Puerto Rico through Hurricane Maria and its aftermath, he found both life changing events very reminiscent of each other. On September 20, 2017, an enormous hurricane pummeled Puerto Rico and devastated much of the island.I come from New York and was living there on 9/11—and I was struck by the similarities between that tragedy and Hurricane Maria. In both situations, I went to bed in one life and woke up in another.But Hurricane Maria also got me thinking about stray dogs and cats and what they go through every day.Let me explain.When Maria’s winds died down, Puerto Rico was without electricity, internet service, and in many parts of the island, running water. Communications were down. Things I’d taken for granted like food, water, and medical care became luxuries that were hard to come by. Most stores were closed and the ones that weren’t only accepted cash. But the banking system was offline and no one could get cash. It was a situation reminiscent of the Great Depression, when people with money in the bank couldn’t withdraw and spend it and the whole economy ground to a halt.Streets that were once well lit and safe became dark and dangerous. There was looting. There were random acts of violence. Many people had to sleep with one eye open—if they got any sleep at all. The situation became so dangerous that the governor was compelled to proclaim an island-wide dusk-to-dawn curfew.Scott Smith and Eli Rivera Jr at the Comfort Inn & Suites in Levittown, Puerto RicoJust days after the storm, I was waiting in a long line at a grocery store, hoping that it wouldn’t run out of food and that I’d have enough cash to get what I needed for my family. And I had a revelation: this is how homeless dogs and cats live every day. They lead precarious lives. They go days without adequate food and water. They don’t get medical care. They’re in constant danger and have to be watchful to the point of paranoia.I was living like that now. So were nearly three million Puerto Ricans. We had become an island of strays.I’ve always had a special connection to animals. I’ve been personally involved in a number of animal rescues. I’m a human dad to four dogs, all of whom were rescued from the streets. Sad to say, there are about half a million more where mine came from—and more than 1 million stray cats. What I went through for several weeks following Hurricane Maria, they go through every day, with little hope that things will get better.As if the tragedy of stray dogs and cats was not horrific enough before Maria hit, it became even worse afterward. Approximately 300,000 people moved away from Puerto Rico on account of the storm. Many of them were unable to take their animals with them. As Maria was bearing down on the island, a friend of mine witnesses heartbreaking scenes at the San Juan airport when families had to abandon their beloved pets. To make matters worse, the federal government banned pets who weighed more than 20 pounds from air travel. The policy was intended to free up cargo space for much-needed relief supplies, but it had the unintended effect of causing another 2,000 pets to be abandoned to the streets.After 9/11, New Yorkers like me figured out ways around the damage and disruption. Yet there was no way around the devastation of Hurricane Maria. It dragged on and on for months—and will likely take years to completely dissipate. Right now, the extraordinary hardships that all of us on the island endured after Hurricane Maria have largely disappeared. But the pain continues for Puerto Rico’s homeless cats and dogs.Photo Credit: Seary FigueroaI saw a tragic example of that last winter. I got a call about a dog that had been hit by a car and badly injured. When I arrived at the scene, I found a terrified animal who was in tremendous pain and who was unable to move his hind legs. It took three hours, but we finally got him into a crate and to the Veterinaria 24/7 in Pinero.As it turned out, this poor dog’s back legs were paralyzed. He will never walk again. Fortunately, he was adopted by a loving family in Wisconsin that is giving him the best life possible. But other dogs and cats aren’t so lucky. It’s depressingly common to see the remains of dogs and cats who’ve been hit by cars in Puerto Rico. To try to combat this problem, I began a video campaign I called Drive With Compassion. It’s something—but it’s not enough.Having lived through a catastrophic storm like Hurricane Maria has given me new insight into the lives of stray animals. I now have some firsthand knowledge of what their lives are like. And having welcomed stray dogs off the Puerto Rican streets and into my heart, I can attest to how just one person can save a life.I encourage everyone to become the person who makes that kind of difference in a stray dog or cat’s life. There are some terrific organizations here that support those of us who become that difference. I urge you all to help and support them: All Sato Rescue, Alianza Pro Rescate Animales, Yes We Can-ine, Samas Boarding for Dogs, Rabito Kontento, The Humane Society of Puerto Rico, PrAnimals.org, Animalitos de Dios PR and Brownie Blondie Foundation by Marjorie Andino.Remember what I learned: hurricanes like Maria are (I hope!) a once-in-a-lifetime occurrence. But what the strays of Puerto Rico experience goes on day after day after day without end. Only people who are able and willing to step up can stop it.last_img read more