Inside Spurs’ makeshift coronavirus operation where nurses test 70 people a day

first_img7TOTTENHAM proved they are just what the doctor ordered – as their new stadium yesterday became the first Prem ground to be used as a coronavirus testing site.The North London club has let the NHS use its new £1billion arena as a giant Covid-19 swabbing centre and medical day centre.⚠️ Read our coronavirus in sport live blog for the latest news & updates7 Tottenham’s new stadium is being used as a coronavirus testing siteCredit: Tottenham HotspurThe stadium’s huge basement car park is being used to conduct the drive-through Covid-19 operation for nearby North Middlesex University Hospital staff, their families and dependents.Around 70 tests a day are expected to be carried out each day from Monday-Friday between 10am-2pm by a team of 10 nurses.The North Middlesex has also relocated its Women’s Outpatient Services department to the stadium to free up much-needed capacity at the hospital itself to treat patients facing Covid symptoms whilst supporting the redirection of pregnant women away from the hospital during the pandemic.The ground Media Entrance and Cafe is now used as a main reception and welfare area for visitors and NHS staff.7 70 people a day are being tested in the underground car parkCredit: Tottenham Hotspur7 A brave team of ten nurses are working at the £1bn arenaCredit: Tottenham HotspurGive now to The Sun’s NHS appealBRITAIN’s four million NHS staff are on the frontline in the battle against coronavirus.But while they are helping save lives, who is there to help them?The Sun has launched an appeal to raise £1MILLION for NHS workers.The Who Cares Wins Appeal aims to get vital support to staff in their hour of need.We have teamed up with NHS Charities Together in their urgent Covid-19 Appeal to ensure the money gets to exactly who needs it.The Sun is donating £50,000 and we would like YOU to help us raise a million pounds, to help THEM.No matter how little you can spare, please donate today herewww.thesun.co.uk/whocareswinsappealThe NFL Away changing room areas are now used as a Maternal Day Unit.The interview rooms off of the players’ tunnel – where post-match TV interviews are normally conducted – as well as the referees’ area, are now used as consultation and scanning rooms.And the away dressing room area are now used as a Midwives Clinical Room and staff Admin Office.Spurs chairman Daniel Levy said: “We are proud to be handing over our stadium to our wonderful NHS as we fight Covid-19 together.CORONAVIRUS CRISIS – BE IN THE KNOWGet the latest coronavirus news, facts and figures from around the world – plus essential advice for you and your family.To receive our Covid-19 newsletter in your inbox every tea time, sign up here.To follow us on Facebook, simply ‘Like’ our Coronavirus page.Most Read In SportTHROUGH ITRobbie Keane reveals Claudine’s father was ’50-50′ in coronavirus battle’I ACCEPT’McGregor accepts Silva fight at UFC catchweight of 176lbs in huge super-fightTOP SELLERGavin Whelan has gone from League of Ireland to David Beckham’s InstagramPicturedA CUT ABOVEMike Tyson shows two-inch cut ‘picked up in training’ ahead of boxing returnPicturedAN EYEFULMeet Playboy model and football agent Anamaria Prodan bidding to buy her own clubI SAW ROORodallega saw Rooney ‘drinking like madman’ & Gerrard ‘on bar dancing shirtless’“We reached out to the NHS and the Mayor of London’s Office when the pandemic first started to explore ways in which our stadium’s facilities could be of use, so we are pleased to see this now becoming a reality.“I should like to commend staff at North Middlesex Hospital, along with our own Stadium Operations team, who have worked tirelessly over recent weeks to find solutions to transform our stadium for such a vital cause.”Middlesex Hospital chief executive Maria Kane said: “We are so grateful to Tottenham Hotspur for providing their wonderful facilities for our staff, patients and local community during these difficult times.”7 Jose Mourinho’s press conference room is being used by nurses as a briefing roomCredit: Tottenham Hotspur7 Other nurses in the concourse at Tottenham’s stadiumCredit: Tottenham Hotspur7Credit: Tottenham HotspurTottenham midfielder Dele Ali shows off incredible house & home cinema while on lockdownlast_img read more

Calling it a waste of time researchers call for end to scientific

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Thirty-two scientists are calling for an end to the International Whaling Commission’s (IWC’s) current program for reviewing “scientific whaling” proposals.In a letter to the editor in today’s Nature, the researchers, who are members of IWC’s Scientific Committee, argue that IWC’s current review process “is a waste of time” and sorely in need of revision.A prominent case in point, the authors say, is IWC’s experience with Japan’s controversial research whaling programs: Although IWC rules have required a lengthy scientific review of that effort, which began in 1987, the process has also allowed Japanese researchers to essentially ignore the critique. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) “Japan … has failed to alter its plans in any meaningful way and is proceeding to kill whales under a self-determined quota,” the authors write.“It’s what happens year after year,” says Andrew Brierley, a pelagic ecologist at University of St. Andrews in the United Kingdom, and one of the letter’s authors. The scientists are “frustrated because the recommendations of the expert panel IWC convened are ignored,” he says.But Joji Morishita, director general of Japan’s National Research Institute of Far Seas Fisheries, says that Japan’s cetacean scientists “think the review process is quite reasonable, and has helped shape our research and implementation.” And IWC said “the review process has strong scientific merit,” in a statement to ScienceInsider.Meaningful reviews?Although IWC enacted a moratorium on commercial whaling in 1982, one provision in its conventions allows member nations to kill whales for research. IWC doesn’t issue permits for such hunts—the individual countries do. Although Norway and Iceland (which did not agree to the moratorium) also kill whales, Japan is the lone nation to claim it is whaling for scientific purposes. (The meat collected from the hunts is sold in Japan.)Because Japan says it is doing science, it submits its research proposals to IWC’s Scientific Committee to be peer reviewed. The proposals are first examined by an independent panel of experts. Last year, a panel reviewing Japan’s most recent proposal concluded that “lethal sampling had not been justified,” write the authors of the Nature letter.Japanese researchers say they are studying such things as the cetaceans’ health, ages, and diets, and which whales belong to which populations. It’s the kind of information that biologists collect when managing animals for sustainable hunts.The panel, however, recommended that Japan explore other nonlethal methods—already widely used by other cetacean scientists—for collecting that information. Scientists could use darts to collect tissue samples, for instance, or collect feces to determine what the whales are eating.Japan has looked at such methods, says Morishita, noting that IWC’s full scientific committee ultimately “gave us a total of 29 recommendations. … We responded to all of them, as we are required.”Brierley, however, says the back-and-forth produced little change. He joined the expert panel “in good faith,” he says, and then discovered that “it wasn’t a genuine peer review. It doesn’t follow the standard scientific review process.”The procedure is flawed, the authors argue, because at the second stage, when IWC’s science committee meets, it gives equal weight to the opinions of the proposers and the expert panel of referees, and the reviews are nonbinding. If Japan were actually following IWC’s recommendations, Brierley says, it would now be trying to answer its research questions with nonlethal methods.In its statement, IWC points out its reviews and reports “have been widely debated and referenced by parties on all sides of the [scientific whaling] debate including the 2014 ruling of the International Court of Justice,” which found that Japan’s whaling program was not about science.Japan suspended part of its whaling program after that ruling, but has since resumed hunting. Japanese whalers are now in the Southern Ocean, targeting 333 minke whales for the research program; it calls for killing 333 minke whales annually for the next 12 years. Since 1987, Japan has killed 10,712 minke whales for science.last_img read more