Shumlin announces Karen Marshall to lead Connect VT effort

first_imgGovernor Peter Shumlin today announced that Karen Marshall, a Chittenden County business executive and community leader, will take the position of Chief of Connect VT. Marshall will be responsible for implementing Gov. Shumlin’s plan to achieve universal availability of broadband and mobile phone service.‘Connect VT is one of the most important initiatives of my administration,’ the Governor said. ‘It is vital that the telecommunication highway is in place for Vermonters by the end of 2013. It will connect our economic engines to the global marketplace, and enable our health care providers to be at the forefront of innovative, cost effective delivery and administration of health care.’‘Karen will work with private sector companies and utilities that are deploying roughly $410 million of federal funding and their own capital to do this,’ said Administration Secretary Jeb Spaulding. ‘She will also be engaged in efforts across state government to use broadband to improve the way that public services are delivered.’Prior to this appointment, Marshall served as Chief Operating Officer at SecurShred, a Vermont owned and operated business providing confidential document shredding, imaging, storage and electronic waste services throughout the region. Prior to that, she served as Vice President Northern New England for Comcast Spotlight, the advertising division of Comcast Cable, and Vice President/Vermont for Clear Channel Communications, where she managed 15 radio stations.Marshall has played an active role in community service, as well, serving currently as Chair of the Vermont Economic Progress Council, a board member of the Visiting Nurse Association of Chittenden and Grand Isle counties, the Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce, and UVM’s Athletic Advisory Council.Marshall, who lives in Williston, will join the Agency of Administration. Her salary will be $115,000.Shumlin’s office. 1.27.2011last_img read more

Rower Tupek striving to meet lofty expectations in 2005

first_imgLast year, Wisconsin oarsman Mike Tupek was something of an anomaly.As the only member of his class placed in the top shell as a sophomore, Tupek found himself among a group of experienced rowers vying for a place among the national elite. As the youngest member of the varsity eights, he experienced the high of Wisconsin’s shocking upset of West Coast powerhouse Washington and the low of a disappointing finish at the Intercollegiate Rowing Regatta.Now, after the departure of multiple seniors — including the last remnants of Wisconsin’s third-ranked boat of 2003 — Tupek has suddenly become the cagey veteran.Yet Wisconsin head coach Chris Clark still expects improvement from his standout junior rower. After mustering an impressive debut season in the freshman eights, Tupek suffered somewhat of an off year during his sophomore campaign.“[Tupek] has got to get better,” Clark said. “He came in here with this amazing fire, and last year, I don’t know what it was. He had sort of a strange slump. This year, he is doing better.”As one of the naturally strongest rowers on the team, and also one of the more seasoned, Tupek is being asked to take on more of a leadership role this season. This year’s rowing team is young, with only one senior rower in the first boat. Clark likes Tupek’s aggressive style of rowing and wants other rowers to pick up on that.“Today [in practice], I moved him to stroke, which is like the quarterback because he is super aggressive,” Clark said. “That’s something we often do, is put the most aggressive guy there. He shows other guys that, ‘Oh, this is how it’s supposed to be done.’”Tupek has been in the first boat since his freshman year. Clark is hoping that Tupek’s experience will bear out in the team’s performance not only during practice, but also in the heat of the spring events.“Under the pressure of a big race and the intensity of your competition, you’ll do what is equivalent to a turnover,” Clark said. “Not only do you not win, but you don’t even row your race. Hopefully a guy like [Tupek] can help turn that around. It’s not like you expect him to sit down with everybody and tell tales around the campfire about ‘back when I was a kid,’ but you lead by example.”Tupek’s goals are equivalent to Clark’s. As an individual, his ergometer times and personal achievements are important to him. Yet, ultimately, Tupek wants continuous progress until the Badgers are able to reach the highest level of competition.“Personal expectations are just to improve over past years, both physically and technique-wise,” Tupek said. “As a team, I think the goal is pretty much the same: we want to keep improving each year. If we build a little bit each year, we’ll be back in the running for medals and national championships.”Despite strong recruiting from competing schools, the Bethesda, Md., native eventually chose Wisconsin due to the program’s recent success under Clark and the general appeal of the atmosphere at Madison.“After my recruiting visit, it was pretty unanimous,” Tupek said. “Almost everyone on that same recruiting visit decided this is the place [he wanted] to go. I chose here mostly because, at the time, we were one of the top rowing teams in the country. That was definitely an important part of the decision. Frankly, when I came to visit here, Wisconsin just had a much better atmosphere, in my opinion, and was much more fun.”Academics also played a key role in Tupek’s choice of colleges.“In high school I was strongest at math, so I was interested in engineering,” Tupek said. “The engineering program was strong here, so engineering and rowing basically made my decision to come here.”According to Tupek, he has made the dean’s list four out of his five semesters in Madison. The struggle of balancing his commitment to rowing and his studies has not been difficult for him. Rather, rowing has helped Tupek give his life more structure. “In a way, rowing helps you schedule your homework,” Tupek said. “When you’re not rowing, it’s easy to find distractions and, when you’re rowing, you stay focused on one task. You’re able to focus more on both athletics and academics at the same time.”last_img read more