Governor Wolf Applauds Senate for Unanimous Passage of Justice Reinvestment Initiatives Legislation

first_img April 25, 2018 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Governor Wolf Applauds Senate for Unanimous Passage of Justice Reinvestment Initiatives Legislationcenter_img Criminal Justice Reform,  Press Release,  Public Safety Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today applauded and thanked the Senate for unanimous passage of a package of justice reinvestment initiatives, known as JRI 2, introduced by Senator Stewart Greenleaf.“Passage of JRI 2 legislation will establish solutions to the challenges that incarcerated individuals and those on parole face, ensuring fair, consistent sentencing, probation practices that are evidence-based, and initiatives that expand communications and compensation for crime victims,” Gov. Wolf said. “I applaud Senator Greenleaf and the entire Senate for passage of these important pieces of legislation that will help achieve the goals of a vastly improved criminal justice system.“The commonsense reforms under JRI 2 will help save taxpayers money and ensure that when people have served their time without incident they are able to reenter society in a timely manner so that our taxpayers are not footing the bill for extended prison stays after an individual has served their time.“JRI 2 will invest more resources in our county probation system to improve outcomes and increase the use of evidence-based best practices so that we can improve supervision and training to help probation officers work with individuals and make sure that we are only requiring those who present a real risk to go back for further supervision.“JRI 2 will also help improve sentencing guidelines to further reduce recidivism and will update sentencing guidelines to make sure that we are doing all we can to emphasize risk reduction and help make sure that people are only serving time in accordance with their violation – rather than ordering longer sentences for smaller violations.”The JRI2 package of bills include:SB 1071: Provides for release of ‘short-sentence’ offenders once a minimum sentence is reached and certain provisions are met, including no commission of violent crimes or certain sexual offenses, no gun or high-volume drug delivery offenses, and no misconduct while incarcerated. This will provide significant cost savings for the state.SB1071 also streamlines the process of accessing substance use disorder treatment for incarcerated individuals, which can lead to earlier release from prison.SB 1070: Reinvests savings generated by this bill will be used to create an Advisory Committee that will approve and finance the use of best practices in probation supervision statewide, using evidence-based practices to help county probation departments assess the unique risks and needs of each individual on probation.SB 1072: This bill improves the flow of information to crime victims by prosecutors and police and improves victim compensation for losses incurred during the crime.“We need to work to make our criminal justice system more fair, more equitable and more focused on rehabilitation, which JRI 2 will help do. Since I became governor, I have worked hard to reform our system so that it leads to better outcomes and saves taxpayer dollars – while also leading to less crime and fewer victims,” Gov. Wolf said.Governor Wolf led a call-to-action for criminal justice reform legislation, including JRI 2, at a press conference with Senator Greenleaf on April 12 at the Dauphin County Justice Center.last_img read more

Former SU field hockey standout, Laura Hurff, playing lacrosse this spring

first_imgOne day in third grade, Laura Hurff was “it” in a game of tag. After less than two minutes, Hurff had tagged everyone.She came up to her teacher, who happened to be her mother, Linda, and asked, “What’s next?” Linda remembered making sure not to make her daughter “it” again so the game would last longer.“That’s probably her biggest asset,” Linda said. “Her speed. She’s used it. I’ve always said she’s been given a God-given talent and that’s what you need to do, use it.”That speed helped Hurff become a three-time All-American in field hockey at Syracuse. She was part of the first women’s national championship at SU as a member of the 2015 field hockey team. She hopes to continue her field hockey career as an Olympian for the United States. For now, in her last semester as an undergraduate, she’s returned to her first sport, lacrosse, as a defender for the Orange (2-0) women’s lacrosse team. Hurff said she hopes it’s just another stepping stone toward her field hockey goals.“Her former high school coach was an old friend,” SU head coach Gary Gait said. “… She mentioned it when she was coming, you’ve got a really good lacrosse player that plays field hockey … Sure enough, we got that opportunity to have her.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textLinda played college lacrosse herself at Delaware. She was a member of the second-ever NCAA Division I women’s lacrosse national title team in 1983, her senior year.Syracuse field hockey head coach Ange Bradley, who played both lacrosse and field hockey at UD a few years after Linda graduated, was at that national championship game, Linda remembered. Bradley remembered Linda when Hurff first came to SU, Linda said.Because Linda had devoted much of her life to lacrosse, it was natural for Hurff to pick up a stick early in elementary school, trailing her mother to camps when she couldn’t be left at home. Hurff began playing club lacrosse soon thereafter.“She just pushed me to be the best that I could,” Hurff said, “and to be honest, without my mom coaching me when I was little I don’t know where I would have been.”  Anna Henderson | Digital Design EditorIn middle school, Linda was Hurff’s coach, meaning Hurff was never going to have a free pass. One gameday, Hurff went to the nurse’s office and her temperature was around 102 degrees. So Linda brought her daughter to her office in the school, had her sleep all day and made sure Hurff played well enough in the game’s first half that she could sit out the second.“If I told her to go through this wall,” Linda said, “she would have run through it.”In high school, Hurff played field hockey, basketball and lacrosse. Linda said she thinks her daughter could have played D-I lacrosse, and Hurff said the head coach at Delaware reached out about the possibility. But Hurff always wanted to play in the Olympics, and field hockey is in the Olympics, while lacrosse isn’t.Syracuse, which had turned into an NCAA tournament regular under Bradley, became the place for Hurff to use her speed. Though Hurff didn’t play her mother’s sport, she chose to wear the No. 14 that Linda wore at UD. By Hurff’s sophomore season, she had become the key cog at the heart of SU’s midfield, the year SU won its national title. She had reached the collegiate peak but was still chasing her Olympic dream.As a high schooler, Hurff spent time with the United States under-17 national team. The summer before her junior year, she played with the U.S. under-21 team. All that’s left to reach is the senior team. She’ll be away from Syracuse twice during the season, once for a camp later this week in Chula Vista, California, where the U.S. will take on Canada, and once over spring break.“My hope is that right after college, (U.S. head coach Janneke Schopman will) pull me up officially to the team, and we’re still waiting for that,” Hurff said. “I’m not gonna say that it’s definitely gonna happen because I have no idea but that’s just what I’m hoping will happen.”When Hurff reached out to Gait after the field hockey season ended, first via email and then in his office, she wasn’t sure what to expect. She and Linda had spoken about using a graduate year to play lacrosse, but Hurff took the initiative to finish her senior year with the sport.She feels lacrosse aids her chances of field hockey success. As a defender in lacrosse, Hurff gets opportunities to catch up with attackers, get in front of them and turn them. It’s a skill she hopes will translate to field hockey.Hurff isn’t sure how much she’ll play for SU. Hurff told her mother to get to games early, Linda said, to make sure she can watch her daughter play during warmups.But for the Syracuse senior, it’s not about the playing time. It’s about a chance to further her field hockey career. And it’s coming full circle in the first sport Hurff ever played.Two years from now, in Tokyo, the U.S. field hockey team will be playing in the Olympics. Hurff said she hopes she’ll be there playing, in the sport she chose to reach that peak.“Her mindset is, ‘I’m going, mom. I’m going to be there,’” Linda said. Comments Published on February 19, 2018 at 9:53 pm Contact Billy: wmheyen@syr.edu | @Wheyen3center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more