Ohio Energy Decisions ‘at a Boiling Point’

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享By Andy Chow for WOSU:Ohio’s largest energy companies are trying to figure out what they’re going to do with their coal power plants as they navigate through a vital time in the utilities industry. For the final installment of his three-part series, Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow explores the different paths those utilities can take and what that means for Ohioans who pay to keep the lights on.Many agree that the state of Ohio has reached a boiling point where the fate of coal, renewable energy and the regulatory framework itself must be decided.Businesses and energy companies think so.“It’s not on a front page it’s not something people will immediately understand, it’s geeky stuff,” said Sam Randazzo.“Quite frankly I think we’re at a crossroads,” Todd Snitchler added.Environmentalists think so.“We’re at an incredibly critical transition point,” said Dan Sawmiller.And legislators think so.“We’re at a point where all of those major issues remain undecided,” said Republican Senator Bill Seitz of Cincinnati.AEP and FirstEnergy had plans to keep their struggling coal plants afloat by adding an extra charge to customers’ electric bills. But that was essentially struck down by federal regulators.FirstEnergy is trying to find a new way to fund the plants while AEP has suggested selling off all its coal plants or try to go back to a regulated industry.Full story and audio for three part series here: http://radio.wosu.org/post/power-plant-your-electric-bill-critical-point-future-energy-ohio Ohio Energy Decisions ‘at a Boiling Point’last_img read more

Code for credibility

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Little Silver Seniors’ Club Ending After Nearly 20 Years

first_imgBy Greg Scharen Linda Rizzo, a membersince 2003, was in charge ofhospitality, organizing thefood, beverages and locationsfor the club’s luncheons, acrucial role. Hosting live music and entertainment each week, the club provided a community for people of a certain age to interact with one another, meeting in the Little Silver Borough Hall and Women’s Club. The seniors’ club also hosted luncheons and boat trips throughout the years and focused on service to the community, working with Lunch Break in Red Bank and other organizations to help build a community outside of their own. Seniors of Little Silverstarted out small but grew to72 members at its high point.It then shrank to 42 membersand had a hard time fillingthe governing board seats. The independent social club is disbanding due to lack of support and the advancing age of many integral members, said Symons. “I’m heartbroken,” said Louise Symons, an active club member, echoing similar sentiments of others involved in the club, as they move on from this venture. center_img Symons wanted to thankall of the current and pastmembers of Seniors of LittleSilver for their dedication. After 19 years, the Seniors of Little Silver is ending its run. The club’s final luncheon will be held at noon June 25 at the Molly Pitcher Inn in Red Bank. The club was funded through member dues each year and a variety of 50/50 raffles held throughout the years, but suffered from a lack of identity since membership was open to people residing outside Little Silver. The club began in 2000 with adjunct founder Julia Aymonier and 18 senior residents of Little Silver. Joining later were Symons, Diane Tresente, Rene O’Neil and the senior’s first president Ann Hansen, all of whom have been a driving force in keeping the club going. last_img read more