Up to 800 homes without power following ESB fault

first_imgA power outage has struck South Inishowen this evening, impacting just under 800 homes and businesses.The ESB fault occurred at 5.18pm in Newtowncunningham and surrounding areas.Emergency repair crews are working on the issue and it is estimated that power will be restored to customers by 9pm. Up to 800 homes without power following ESB fault was last modified: November 12th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Plants Generate Their Own Sunscreen

first_imgUltraviolet radiation hits plants as well as humans, but plants can’t reach for a tube of sunscreen.  Too much exposure can damage them; what do they do?  They have a sensor that turns on production of their own brand of sunscreen and spreads it on their skin automatically.    UV-B rays are the most damaging rays in sunlight.  In Science this week,1 researchers at the University of Glasgow explained how plants have a protein named UVR8 that normally comes in pairs.  UV-B rays break up the pairs; as single molecules now, UVR8 proteins link up with others named COP1.  This combination signals the nucleus to ramp up production of sunscreen.  The abstract said in jargon,Absorption of UV-B induces instant monomerization of the photoreceptor and interaction with COP1, the central regulator of light signaling.  Thereby this signaling cascade controlled by UVR8 mediates UV-B photomorphogenic responses securing plant acclimation and thus promotes survival in sunlight.”Professor Gareth Jenkins explained for University of Glasgow News, “When a plant detects UV-B light this light stimulates the synthesis of sunscreen compounds that are deposited in the outer tissues and absorb UV-B, minimizing any harmful transmittance to cells below.”  So it’s not just having UVR8 able to absorb the harmful photons – it’s also a matter of having them link up with other proteins and switch on genes – then having the gene products arrive at the proper destination to give protection quickly.    Scientists knew plants were able to protect themselves, but didn’t know what photoreceptor was sensitive to UV-B light.  “UVR8 is always present throughout a plant so it can respond immediately to sunlight,” the press release said.1.  Rizzini…Jenkins, Ulm et al, “Perception of UV-B by the Arabidopsis UVR8 Protein,” Science, 1 April 2011: Vol. 332 no. 6025 pp. 103-106, DOI: 10.1126/science.1200660.April 1 makes fools of some of us, but plants don’t fool around.  Especially foolish were the brain offerings given to Charlie in the articles.  The press release lit this stick of stinkincense: “plants rarely show signs of damage because they have evolved a way of protecting themselves from the sun’s harmful rays by making their own sunscreen and depositing it in the outer tissues of leaves.”  Would that evolutionists would evolve a way of evolving away evolutionary folly.    The paper in Science was no better: “Several families of plant photoreceptors have evolved that monitor light ranging from ultraviolet-B (UV-B) to the near infrared and allow optimal adaptation to light.”  Their last sentence lubricated the Darwinian imagination: “This raises the intriguing possibility that, together with the development of an ozone layer in the stratosphere of Earth, the evolution of terrestrial plants may be coincident with the acquisition of the UV-induced responses mediated by the UVR8 UV-B photoreceptor.”  Anything’s possible; pigs could evolve wings and fly coincident with the acquisition of big bad wolves in the neighborhood.  That’s intriguing to imagine, too.    How long must we put up with this foolishness?  It’s happening 365x24x7, not just on April Fool’s Day.  Turn off the black light and let the sun shine in, under the ozone of critical thinking.(Visited 39 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

South African flood relief driven by goodwill

first_imgAt least 123 people have died as a resultof the flooding in South Africa. Around20 000 people across the country havebeen affected.(Image: DWA)MEDIA CONTACTS• Mandla MathebulaDepartment of Social Development+27 12 312 7654 or +27 83 282 6133RELATED ARTICLES• South Africa reaches out to Haiti• Congo welcomes SA farmers• Uganda’s Mt Elgon gets a million trees• Better farming with mobilesNosimilo RamelaSouth African churches, community organisations, individuals and the private sector are pulling together to help the thousands of people affected by ongoing flooding in parts of the country.Precious Thabethe from Ivory Park, east of Johannesburg, is trying to restore order in her kitchen after flooding destroyed one of the room’s walls. She has put some plastic and corrugated iron in its place to cover the gaping hole.“The water comes fiercely from the east, that’s why this side of my house is destroyed,” she said. “I know it’s not safe for us to continue living here because we might get swept to our deaths by the water if it continues to rain, but right now we have nowhere to go.”Thabethe lives with her sister and three children in a modest three-roomed house. She saved up for six years before she was able to build her home, and feels she is not ready to let go just yet. “I’ve always wanted my kids to have a home and I built this place for them. I’m really not ready to just walk away from it.”She says the floods have destroyed most of her valuables, and they have been relying on help from her church and food donations to keep alive. “The church donated clothes for us and school uniforms for the kids – all our things got destroyed in the first week of January when the floods hit us.”The local supermarket has been giving out food parcels and various churches are collecting blankets and clothes for families who have lost their belongings. “Those of us whose homes have not been affected are also taking children into our homes, so they are cared for and can continue to attend school,” said MmeMaThato Mokoena, a member of the Methodist Church in the area.Counting the costThe Department of Social Development said the flood damage to infrastructure so far amounts to about R160-million (US$23-million). According to the department, 123 people have died as a result of the flooding and 20 000 people across the country have been affected. Most of the deaths have been reported in KwaZulu-Natal province, but fatalities have also occurred in Gauteng, North West, Limpopo, Eastern Cape and the Northern Cape.Thandeka Ciliza from Uthungulu in KwaZulu-Natal has lost two family members and her home in the devastating floods. “My brother and my nephew passed away while trying to cross a bridge two weeks ago. The water was too high and too strong, the bridge collapsed and swept them away. It’s the worst way to start the year. I have lost my family and my home.”Ciliza said a community organisation called Sakhile has helped her pick up the pieces. “Sakhile collected money from the community to help us bury our loved ones, and they have been providing food, clothes and shelter to us after our house was flooded.”Ciliza said she is still trying to rescue some of her possessions from the destroyed home. “I’ve been going back to collect whatever I can find from our old home. It hurts to see our home destroyed, but I am grateful for the help we have been receiving.”Banking on peopleAbsa, South Africa’s largest retail bank, has donated a R1-million ($142 061) to the government to provide urgent relief to communities affected by the floods.Maria Ramos, the group chief executive at Absa, said the bank hopes the donation will encourage other companies in the country to do the same. The bank has also created a relief fund for cash contributions from individuals and private organisations.“With wet weather conditions set to continue over the next few days over various parts of the country, the situation could become even more dire. The fact that certain farming communities have also been affected could further impact the country’s economy,” said Ramos.Mobile phone giant Vodacom has made R500 000 ($70 995) available for those affected and launched the Vodacom Red Alert initiative, which urges customers to donate money towards flood relief efforts.Small farmers sufferSmall-scale producers are among the hardest hit by the deluge. Many farmlands have been destroyed and stock lost due to burst river banks, with the knock-on effect of workers losing their jobs.Thabani Grootboom worked in a small farm in the Northern Cape, but is currently unemployed because the water-logged land cannot be worked. “There is no work at the farms. The damage is heartbreaking. Farmers are devastated and looking to government to help them recover. Hopefully, one day, they’ll be able to start farming again.”The Department of Agriculture recently warned farmers living along the Vaal and Orange Rivers to move their livestock to higher ground as more flooding was expected. Five flood gates have been opened at the Vaal Dam, one of the country’s largest constructed waterways.Government spokesperson Linda Page said they were closely monitoring other large dams in the country like the Bloemhof Dam in the North West, Gariep Dam in the Free State and the Vanderkloof Dam in the Northern Cape.Social Development Minister Bathibile Dlamini said her department was forming a task team comprising Tiger Brands, the South African Council of Churches and Gift of the Givers to deal with the aftermath.She said her department had already provided some aid to those affected, but raised concerns that it was not reaching victims soon enough. She encouraged all South Africans to join in and help.last_img read more

Opposition threatens stir over alleged fake encounter

first_imgNagpur: Opposition parties in Chhattisgarh have threatened to go on protest if the government fails to order a probe into the alleged extrajudicial killing of two tribals by the police. The incident took place in the Maoist-infested Bastar region near Purungal-Dokapara on January 29. The spot is located near the Dantewada-Bijapur district border.The State police has claimed that two Maoists, identified as Bhima Kadati and Sukmati Hemla, were killed in the encounter and weapons including a rifle were recovered from them.The villagers approached tribal activist and AAP leader Soni Sori and other political parties for support, and have refused to bury the bodies. “Hemla was Kadati’s sister-in-law. They were returning after meeting Kadati’s brother Baman in Kirandul town on January 28 when they were picked up by the security forces. They were killed on January 29. The villagers told me that neither had Maoist connections. The condition of Hemla’s body suggests she may have been raped before being killed,” Ms. Sori told The Hindu.‘Police putting pressure’Ms. Sori alleged the police is trying to destroy evidence by burying the bodies. “The villagers have protected the bodies for over 20 days, but security forces are trying to compel villagers into burying them.” The Congress, led by Dantewada MLA Devati Karma, extended support to the villagers’ protest and appointed a team to probe the matter. Former Chief Minister Ajit Jogi’s Chhattisgarh Janata Congress (CJC) has already begun protests over the issue. Mr. Jogi led a protest march to Chief Minister Raman Singh’s residence in Raipur on Saturday, accompanied by relatives of the deceased. They demanded a second post-mortem and a judicial probe. Mr. Jogi’s son and Marwahi MLA Amit Jogi has already threatened to perform the last rites in front of the Chief Minister’s residence in Raipur if the police personnel responsible are not arrested. AAP leader Sanket Thakur said he is accompanying the victims’ relatives to Bilaspur to file a case in the high court. Mr.Jogi has also said he would move the HC over the issue.SP (Dantewada) Kamlochan Kashyap denied the allegations. “An encounter had happened on January 29 in which two Maoists were killed. Both were Maoists and a part of senior Maoist leader Ganesh Uike’s supply team. They had a number of cases registered against them in various police stations of Bastar. Post-mortems were conducted on both bodies, and they were buried on January 30. However, some elements asked the villagers to exhume them. We can’t do much about the politics being played over this incident,” he said.last_img read more

T20 World Cup: West Indies knock out New Zealand in Super Over

first_imgA spirited West Indies kept alive their semi-final hopes after pulling off a sensational win over New Zealand via Super Over in their final Super Eights match of the ICC World Twenty20 here today.Needing 18 to win in the Super Over, West Indies rode on Chris Gayle and Marlon’s Samuels pyrotechnics to finish the game with a ball to spare at the Pallekele International Cricket Stadium which saw a tied game with both teams finishing on 139 in regulation time.While Gayle started the chase in the Super Over with a huge six over long-off off a no ball by Tim Southee, Sameuls completed the job with a maximum over deep mid-wicket.With three loses from as many games, New Zealand have crashed out of the tournament.The game went into the Super Over after New Zealand made heavy weather of a modest 140-run chase.Ross Taylor, who gave New Zealand hope with his aggressive batting in the Super Over, played a captain’s knock but his unbeaten 62 went in vain as chasing 140, New Zealand managed 139 for seven in their alloted 20 overs.Sunil Narine shone with the ball for West Indies with figures of three for 20 from his four overs, which included the penultimate over of the New Zealand innings in which the off-spinner conceded just three runs besides picking up a wicket.Earlier, pacers Doug Bracewell and Tim Southee came up with superb bowling efforts to help New Zealand bundle out West Indies for a lowly 139.New Zealand’s decision to field first produced the desired result as the Kiwi bowlers managed to frustrate the opposition batsmen throughout. Southee (3/21) and Bracewell (3/31) claimed three wickets each, while Nathan MuCullum took two for 19 to end Windies’ innings in 19.3 overs.advertisementlast_img read more