Inadequate Funds Hamper Renovation

first_imgRenovation work at the Sports Commission, on Broad Street is proceeding gradually but lack of funds will make the project incomplete.Liberia Basketball Association President Rufus Anderson told the Daily Observer yesterday that the project is being done partially.“We are replacing a portion of the sitting area with concrete,” he said, “but the top portion will not be done due to inadequate funds.”Though he was unable to say how much the renovation would cost the LBA, the job is proceeding as expected.“The breakdown of expenditure is already sent to all clubs,” Anderson said, but explained that he could not say how much the project would cost.On a projected cost, Anderson could still not come up with a figure, but said, “Go to Samukai he has a copy.”He was making reference to the owner of K-Delta female basketball team, Mr. Abraham Samukai, who responded to a telephone interview yesterday, “I’m yet to receive a copy of the breakdown of the project.”A construction worker at the Sports Commission had initially argued that our reporter did not have the authorization to take pictures of the ongoing work at the Sports Commission.Though he did not say whether his argument was a directive from the Liberia Basketball Association, he still insisted that our reporter needed authorization from the LBA to take pictures of the on-going work.President Anderson, who was reviewing the project yesterday during the argument, asked our reporter if he had taken any pictures of the ongoing work at the commission. The answer was negative, and our reporter asked him, “How do we get authorization from the LBA to report on the progress of your renovation work here, Mr. Anderson?”Without providing any verbal answer, he instructed our reporter to go ahead and get the pictures he wanted.However, he did not educate the construction worker why it was necessary to cooperate with sports writers who would visit the Commission, and wanting to gather information, including pictures for publication.“That’s strange,” said a bystander who witnessed the exchanges, “at least Anderson should have told the worker that he cannot stop journalists to do their work at public places.”Perhaps the construction worker’s action stemmed from the current impasse on the leadership of the LBA. Aggrieved basketball owners are at loggerheads with Anderson’s administration and the crisis has been ongoing since 2014.“Anderson has avoided the media for some time,” said another basketball player who has followed the development of the leadership crisis, “he must have improved relations with the media.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Google Apps for Government Addresses Cloud Security Concerns

first_imgTags:#cloud#news The LA Times reported over the weekend that Google had missed its deadline for implementing a the city’s new email system, in part because it had not fully responded to some of the LA Police Department’s security concerns.But Google announced this morning that it was introducing a new edition of Google Apps, Google Apps for Government, an indication that Google is still committed to making inroads into enterprise, schools, and now government.Google Apps boasts Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) certification from the U.S. Government – the first suite of cloud computing applications to receive it. The FISMA law applies to all systems utilized by federal government agencies, and Google’s accreditation means that the federal government has reviewed Google’s security controls. “This review,” says Google in the blog post announcing the Apps for Government edition, “makes it easier for federal agencies to compare our security features to those of their existing systems; most agencies we have worked with have found that Google Apps provides at least equivalent, if not better, security than they have today. This means government customers can move to the cloud with confidence.”Google Apps for Government stores Gmail and Calendar data in a separate storage system housed state-side, one designed exclusively for Google’s government contractors. Google Apps for Government is available to any federal, state or local government in the U.S., and according to Google “should give governments an even stronger case for making the move to the cloud.”Whether or not it’s a strong enough case for the Los Angeles Police Department, and other skeptics, remains to be seen. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketcenter_img audrey watters Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts last_img read more

A German court has blocked plans by ProSiebenSat1

first_imgA German court has blocked plans by ProSiebenSat.1 and RTL to launch a catch-up TV service in the country. The commercial broadcasters had wanted to launch an online service with their own, and third-party content.
The country’s competition watchdog the Bundeskartellamt ruled last year that the ProSieben and RTL service would take too great a share of total advertising revenues. The broadcasters appealed that decision, but yesterday the Higher Regional Court of Dusseldorf also ruled against them.ProSiebenSat.1 and RTL denied the service, dubbed Amazonas, would create a duopoly as it would have been a technical platform that was open to all broadcasters.Meanwhile, a group of producers and distributors from the German TV and movie business are pushing ahead with Germany’s Gold, a new venture that will launch a video-on-demand service using the partners’ content. Seventeen companies are involved in the service, which will be based in Berlin, including Beta Film, ZDF, MME Moviement and Studio Hamburg.Hulu has been tipped to launch a service in Germany. So far, its only international roll out has been in Japan. Netflix is also expanding in Europe and Lovefilm already has a service in Germany.last_img read more

Magnetic liquids improve energy efficiency of buildings

Explore further Citation: Magnetic liquids improve energy efficiency of buildings (2018, January 16) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-magnetic-liquids-energy-efficiency.html Climate protection and the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions have been on top of global development agendas. Accordingly, research and development projects have been conducted on national and international levels, which aim for the improvement of the CO2-footprint in diverse processes. Apart from particularly energy-intensive sectors of the industry, the building sector in particular is among the biggest CO2-emitters: From residential homes, manufacturing facilities and storage depots to big commercial buildings, about 40 percent of the energy consumption within the EU are due to the heating, cooling, air conditioning and lighting of buildings. Considering next-generation smart windows and façade devices, one aspect of this problem is addressed in the research project Large-Area Fluidic Windows (LaWin) which has been coordinated at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany, since 2015. A new type of such smart windows was now presented in the upcoming issue of ‘Advanced Sustainable Systems’. In their paper ‘Large-Area Smart Window with Tunable Shading and Solar-Thermal Harvesting Ability Based on Remote Switching of a Magneto-Active Liquid’ the Jena materials researchers introduce prototypes of a window that changes its light permeability at the touch of a button, and, at the same time, can be used for solar-thermal energy harvesting.Liquids in windows and façades”Our project’s key feature is the use of liquids in windows and façades, for example, as heat carriers or to enable additional functions,” explains Lothar Wondraczek, the project’s coordinator. “To this end we develop new glass materials, into which large-area channel structures are integrated. These are used for circulating functional fluids.”In latest prototypes, the liquid is loaded with the nanoscale magnetic iron particles. These can be extracted from the liquid with the help of a magnet. Vice versa, they can be re-suspended by simply switching-off the magnet. “Depending on the number of the iron particles in the liquid, the liquid itself takes on different shades of grey, or it will even turn completely black,” Wondraczek explains. “Then, it becomes possible to automatically adjust the incidence of light, or to harvest solar heat which can then be put to further use within the building.” The efficiency in terms of heat gain per area is comparable with that of state-of-the-art solar thermal facilities. But unlike those, the present system can be readily integrated in a vertical façade. Switching between on and off – the release or capture of particles – happens in a separate tank. An electrical connection at the windows is not necessary.Indoor air conditioning, tunable shading and harvesting of solar heat”The greatest advantage of large-scale fluidic windows is that they can substitute air conditioning systems, daylight regulation systems and for instance warm water processing,” stresses Wondraczek, who holds the chair of Glass Chemistry at the University of Jena. Developing cost-effective large-size window glass modules is key. On the one hand the glass elements need to include the channels, on the other hand they maintain their performance over the whole lifespan of the building. Finally, they have to provide the ability for integration with standard window manufacture technologies in frames of double or triple glazings. With the present prototypes which were manufactured on a scale of around 200 square meters, the research consortium demonstrated that those requirements can be fulfilled.Over the period of 2015-2017, the project received a grant of 5.9 million Euros from the European Union within the framework of the Horizon-2020-Programme for Industrial Leadership. A further 2.2 million Euro have been added by eleven industry partners who have been members of the consortium. After the end of the first funding period, commercialisation of first applications is planned for this year. Provided by Friedrich Schiller University of Jena Intelligent façades generating electricity, heat and algae biomass More information: Benjamin P. V. Heiz et al. A Large-Area Smart Window with Tunable Shading and Solar-Thermal Harvesting Ability Based on Remote Switching of a Magneto-Active Liquid, Advanced Sustainable Systems (2017). DOI: 10.1002/adsu.201700140 A prototype of the innovative smart windows for controlled shading and solar thermal energy harvesting is presented by PhD student Benjamin Heiz from the research group of Lothar Wondraczek. Credit: Jan-Peter Kasper/FSU Jena This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

Worm uploaded to a computer and trained to balance a pole

Explore further Credit: TU Wien “This reflexive response of such a neural circuit, is very similar to the reaction of a control agent balancing a pole,” says Ramin Hasani (Institute of Computer Engineering, TU Wien). This is a typical control problem that can be solved quite well by standard controllers. A pole is fixed on its lower end on a moving object, and it is supposed to stay in a vertical position. Whenever it starts tilting, the lower end has to move slightly to keep the pole from tipping over. Much like the worm has to change its direction whenever it is stimulated by a touch, the pole must be moved whenever it tilts.Mathias Lechner, Radu Grosu and Ramin Hasani wanted to find out whether the neural system of C. elegans, uploaded to a computer, could solve this problem – without adding any nerve cells, just by tuning the strength of the synaptic connections. This basic idea (tuning the connections between nerve cells) is also the characteristic feature of any natural learning process. It is not much to look at: the nematode C. elegans is about one millimetre in length and is a very simple organism. But for science, it is extremely interesting. C. elegans is the only living being whose neural system has been analysed completely. It can be drawn as a circuit diagram or reproduced by computer software, so that the neural activity of the worm is simulated by a computer program. Such an artificial C. elegans has now been trained at TU Wien (Vienna) to perform a remarkable trick: The computer worm has learned to balance a pole at the tip of its tail. C. elegans has to get by with only 300 neurons. But they are enough to make sure that the worm can find its way, eat bacteria and react to certain external stimuli. It can, for example, react to a touch on its body. A reflexive response is triggered and the worm squirms away. This behaviour is determined by the worm’s nerve cells and the strength of the connections between them. When this simple reflex network is recreated on a computer, the simulated worm reacts in exactly the same way to a virtual stimulation – not because anybody programmed it to do so, but because this kind of behaviour is hard-wired in its neural network. Provided by Vienna University of Technology The analogue, natural version of C.elegans. Credit: TU Wien Citation: Worm uploaded to a computer and trained to balance a pole (2018, February 6) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-worm-uploaded-pole.html Is it a computer program or a living being? At TU Wien (Vienna), the boundaries have become blurred. The neural system of a nematode was translated into computer code – and then the virtual worm was taught amazing tricks. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A brain chemical blamed for mental decline in old age could hold key to its reversal A Program without a Programmer”With the help of reinforcement learning, a method also known as ‘learning based on experiment and reward,’ the artificial reflex network was trained and optimized on the computer,” Mathias Lechner explains. The team succeeded in teaching the virtual nerve system to balance a pole. “The result is a controller, which can solve a standard technology problem – stabilizing a pole, balanced on its tip. But no human being has written even one line of code for this controller, it just emerged by training a biological nerve system,” says Radu Grosu.The team is going to explore the capabilities of such control circuits further. The project raises the question whether there is a fundamental difference between living nerve systems and computer code. Is machine learning and the activity of our brain the same on a fundamental level? At least we can be pretty sure that the simple nematode C. elegans does not care whether it lives as a worm in the ground or as a virtual worm on a computer hard drive. In real life, the worm reacts to touch—and the same neural curcuits can perform tasks in the computer. Credit: TU Wien More information: Worm-level Control through Search-based Reinforcement Learning: docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid … Q3YjZhZTZiYWJiNDI5NA read more