S&P: Water availability a growing threat for many U.S. coal-fired power plants

first_imgS&P: Water availability a growing threat for many U.S. coal-fired power plants FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Many of the nation’s coal-fired power plants, often heavy consumers of water resources, are located in areas projected to soon face water stress due to climate change. Water stress occurs when humanity’s competition for water exceeds the rate at which nature can replenish its stocks.Based on an analysis of data from S&P Global Market Intelligence and the Water Resources Institute, power generators in Texas, Indiana, Illinois, Wyoming and Michigan operate about 37.1 GW of coal-fired generation capacity in areas projected to face medium-high to extremely-high water stress due to climate change in 2030. And those five states are home to more than one-third of the 98.2 GW of coal capacity analyzed that fall into those upper-risk categories.Thus, an aging coal-fired fleet already retiring en masse due to the economic challenges of competing with renewable energy and natural gas-fired generation may come under even more intense pressure due to competition for limited water resources.Earlier this year, Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association Inc. CEO Duane Highley announced the company would be closing its remaining coal-fired power plants in New Mexico and Colorado as the company shifts to the use of more renewable energy. “I’ll say it presents an enormous opportunity for all of us, as we think about it,” Highley said. “When you look at a typical coal facility, it uses an enormous volume of water, and the fact that that will be liberated and available for other reuse is going to be significant.”About 98.2 GW, or 44.6%, of the operating coal-fired capacity in the lower 48 states is located in regions expected to face medium-high to extremely-high water stress by the end of the decade. Of the 25.1 GW of coal-fired plants that have regulatory approval to retire, about 62% is in areas projected to face medium-high to extremely-high water stress in 2030.Many U.S. coal-fired plants are already struggling to compete with other forms of generation. As water becomes scarce, disputes around the resource are likely to increasingly factor into energy infrastructure decision making, said Joe Smyth, a research and communications manager with the Energy Policy Institute who authored a July 2020 report examining coal and water conflicts in the American West. “This is just one more sort of factor that may help push them to make those decisions in favor of closing coal plants and pursue renewables,” Smyth said.[Taylor Kuykendall and Esther Whieldon]More ($): Rising water stress risk threatens US coal plants, largely clustered in 5 stateslast_img read more

Quinton de Kock won’t be SA’s Test captain, confirms Graeme Smith

first_imgJohannesburg: Graeme Smith, who has been appointed South Africas director of cricket for the next two years, has confirmed that Quinton de Kock will not be given the extra responsibility of Test captaincy.“The one thing I can confirm is that Quinton will be our white-ball captain and he won’t be the Test captain going forward,” ESPNcricinfo quoted Smith as saying on Friday.“We want to keep Quinton fresh and playing well. I’ve always believed, having been in the job myself, that captaining all three formats is challenging. We’ve seen a number of nations trying to figure out what’s best and I think across three formats, it probably doesn’t work.”“From a workload and mental capacity, we felt that to burden him with all three formats wouldn’t be beneficial for us. And with the style of personality and player that he is, we want to keep him as expressive as possible,” he added.The wicketkeeper-batsman was handed South Africa’s country’s white-ball captaincy in January and succeeded Faf du Plessis, who also stood down from the Test captaincy last year but remains available as a player.With the Proteas not scheduled to play any Tests before a tour to West Indies in July-August, Cricket South Africa will have time to decide whom to appoint Test captain.Smith, however, gave no indication of the likely replacement of du Plessis.“There’s no one person you can pinpoint,” he said. “There are a lot of players on a similar level.”But the new CSA director indicated that the Proteas could take a chance on someone with potential. “We’ve got to understand the personalities, look at the people and maybe take a risk on someone potentially and back them,” Smith said. “Coming from a person who a risk was taken on, it is something we would consider,” he added. IANSAlso Read: Team India ‘unbelievable’ but we are confident: Quinton de KockAlso Watch: COVID-19 prevention: Kamrup(M) district administration selling vegetableslast_img read more

Syracuse women’s basketball recovers from sloppy start to dominate Siena, 102-65

first_img Published on November 14, 2016 at 9:40 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 Blood dripped from Brittney Sykes’ face as the redshirt senior slapped the side of the baseline panel and took a seat. One minute into the night, she had sustained what appeared to be an elbow to the lip and was forced out of the game.In her absence, Siena exploded to a 9-0 run. Ninety seconds of action saw Alexis Peterson get stripped and SU air ball 3-pointers.Midway through the first quarter, without one of its star players, Syracuse trailed by six.But eight seconds into the second, Gabby Cooper drilled a 3 from the right wing, sparking a 14-1 run. The spurt supercharged No. 14 Syracuse’s (2-0) offense to a 29-9 second quarter outburst. After a deadlocked 20-20 opening frame, the Orange dominated Siena (0-1), 102-65, Monday night in the Carrier Dome.“It’s tough because this is their first game so we had last year’s tapes,” Syracuse head coach Quentin Hillsman said, referencing SU’s film study on Siena. “We kind of just had to play a little bit.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSU scored 100 points for the first time since 2013 and racked up at least 95 points for the second-consecutive game to start the year. By game’s end, Isabella Slim (16 points), Sykes (18), Briana Day (19), Peterson (19), Cooper (11) and Jade Phillips (10) had contributed double-figure scoring.Returning its top four scorers from a year ago, Siena came out strong in the first quarter. Jackie Benitez repeatedly hit pull-up jumpers to keep the Saints in it. While Siena’s leading scorer in 2015-16, junior point guard Kollyns Scarbrough, was held to nine points, the Saints converted on chances, shooting 50 percent from the field in the first. Syracuse, meanwhile, played sloppily in the opening minutes against a team that has had only one winning season over the last decade.The Orange got its shots but the only uncertainty was how many it’d knock down. SU went just 6-for-16 from the field. Even in the 29-point second quarter, Syracuse shot only 35 percent from the field. Where it thrived was in shot generation, tallying 31 shots and hitting on 11.Syracuse paced the floor in the second quarter and beyond, applied pressure defensively and chucked up shots — something it had not done in the opening 10 minutes. The Orange switched from a three-quarter-court defense to full court. In the half court, SU extended farther than it did in the first — near the midcourt line — to pressure Siena guards. When backup guards came on, Syracuse suffocated the Saints offense.“Our point guards got in some foul trouble, which hurt,” Siena head coach Ali Jaques said. “I think it caused some tentativeness.”Even when SU sagged off, the Saints could hardly get shots off. They scored just two points inside the paint and shot only 1-for-11 in the second quarter.Cooper’s early 3-pointer sparked the run. From the wing, Sykes threw a dart to Day’s chest. Day made an up-and-under move for the basket. A couple of possessions later, Sykes cut to the dish for two. Then she maneuvered her way around Siena center Meghan Donohue for a bucket down low.Phillips drilled a slight-fade away 3 from the wing, pulling her hands down. Syracuse head coach Quentin Hillsman took a sip of water and shook his head with a light chuckle. A Day to Sykes alley-oop layup off an inbound pass followed.Toward the end of the quarter, Chelayne Bailey drove from the wing, drawing a second defender before she slotted a pass to Isabella Slim for two points. Syracuse jogged into the locker room up 49-29 at the half, turning a tie game into one that would soon be out of reach. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more