Avian flu reported again in Indonesia

first_imgMar 3, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – More than 12,000 chickens and quail have died in the past 2 months in an outbreak of avian influenza on the Indonesian island of Java, according to an Associated Press (AP) report published today.The viruses involved are H5N1 and H7N1, said an Indonesian official who spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity. Avian flu killed about 1.6 million chickens in the same region in West Java province last year, the official said.H5N1 avian flu has occurred in at least eight Asian countries since late 2003 and has caused 66 human illness cases, 46 of them fatal. No human cases have been reported in Indonesia, the AP report said.Although the official told the AP that Indonesia has been dealing with the outbreak for 2 months, the country’s most recent report on avian flu to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) was filed in October 2004.Meanwhile, Vietnam has reported that its poultry outbreaks are subsiding. More than 1.5 million birds have been culled in Vietnam since January. However, 14 of 35 affected areas have detected no new outbreaks for at least 3 weeks, China’s Xinhua news agency reported today, citing Vietnam’s Department of Animal Health.Avian flu has continued to spread in Ben Tre, Long An, and Dong Thap provinces, according to a Vietnam News Service report yesterday.Thailand’s most recent report to OIE indicated the country still has sporadic outbreaks, with fewer than 200 chickens and ducks fatally infected or culled in the week that ended Feb 24.last_img read more

Canadian Badgers bring home gold

first_imgView Gallery (2 Photos)We’ve all heard about the Wisconsin women’s hockey players who represented the United States in the Olympics last year, but with six players who call Canada their home, USA hockey isn’t the only national organization taking notice of the Badgers.Over winter break, forwards Mallory Deluce and Carolyne Prevost, along with defensemen Brittany Haverstock and Stef McKeough, joined Team Canada’s under-22 team in the MLP Nations Cup.With Team Canada these four Badgers played against teams from Switzerland, Germany, Sweden and Russia. Not only were they playing against the other countries’ senior teams, they brought home the gold medal for the eighth time in the last nine years.“It was definitely a lot of fun,” McKeough said. “I mean every time you’re able to put on a Team Canada jersey it’s a privilege. Then when you come back here it’s a privilege to wear the Wisconsin one. I guess hard work always pays off. When your dreams, in a sense, are starting to come into reality, it’s a relief almost and it’s really exciting at the same time.”While all four have played for one of Canada’s national teams at some point, Deluce and Prevost each played in the MLP Cup a year ago with similar success.With two more Badgers on the roster this year, they were more than thrilled to share the experience.“Obviously it’s always an honor when you play for your own country,” Haverstock said. “It was awesome. When I found out I was really excited, and to get to play with some of the Badgers was an even better experience.”“It’s always a great honor to be a part of that team,” Prevost added. “It was good to have a chance to play three other of my teammates. It made it a lot more pleasant to be out there. A lot of the times we were out on the ice at the same time, there was a little Wisconsin line going on. It was really fun.”Through four games Prevost, McKeough and Deluce each netted a goal. While Prevost and McKeough ended the tournament with four points, Deluce had five.Regardless of their individual stats, the four Badgers were proud to help bring the gold back to Canada and show what women’s hockey is capable of.“It’s a good experience obviously to play against the best players from other countries,” Prevost said. “It was our under-22 team, and we’re playing against other countries senior teams. It tells a lot about the development of hockey. It’s really fun obviously to win the tournament. We’re just trying to get women’s hockey to develop, that’s pretty much the primary goal of the tournament. It’s coming along in a big way too.”“It means a lot,” Deluce added. “You really work hard, and to win gold is a big accomplishment for us.”Skating for Team Canada was an honor for the four Badgers, but they weren’t the only WCHA representatives. Jessica Wong from Duluth as well as Laura McIntosh and Natalie Spooner from Ohio State also represented the WCHA.Going from friends on one team to rivals on the next may not seem like the easiest transition, but it is simply a mutual understanding.“We definitely still talk during the year, but I think we’re all pretty competitive people and we know that when we step on the ice, it’s time to play hockey and put the friendships aside for awhile,” Haverstock said. “But we definitely continue them after the game.”Prevost also noted that despite the rivalries, they respect each other and know that it is just part of the world of hockey.“When you’re part of a team obviously you have set goals as a team. You focus on the task at hand with the team that you’re with. That’s what we all try to do,” she said. “There’s different players from college teams that we play here and there’s rivalries when we play each other, but when it comes down to it, when we’re playing for Team Canada, we’re all a team. We respect each other and have fun.”Having fun and representing your country is really what it’s all about. “Anytime I play hockey I have fun,” McKeough said. “When you’re there it’s just another step, and it really pushes you to try to prove to the rest of the players who you are and where you come from. Then again you also see how hard everyone else works so it’s doubly motivating in a sense.”last_img read more