Dan Camp, Who Created a Mississippi Jewel, Dies at 79

first_img“Most people in the community thought I was crazy for going into such a dilapidated slum area to do anything like this,” he told Mississippi Public Broadcasting in 2013.Over the years he added small cottages — 300 to 500 square feet, aimed at students — and assorted other residential units, as well as stores, restaurants, bars and public spaces, all of it on narrow streets that encouraged foot traffic and a communal feel. The district was built on the principles of the 1980s movement known as New Urbanism but came into being well before that term had been coined.“Mayor Camp talked about walkability and mixed-use development before it was cool,” Parker Wiseman, his successor as mayor, said on Twitter. “He didn’t just talk about it. He built it.” After that, Mr. Roy said, Mr. Camp kept giving him commissions just to support his art.“At any given time he might also be patron to a writer, a sculptor, a wild impressionist, a barefoot juggler, a lost intellectual or an ethically sourced hippie apparel shop,” he said. “He wanted a carousel of creatives in the neighborhood by design.”In addition to his son Robert, Mr. Camp is survived by his wife, Gemma, whom he married in 1981; another son, Frederick, known as Bonn; and two granddaughters. In 1969, Mr. Camp started buying property in that area and creating an eclectic oasis of tightly packed housing and businesses that has been drawing admiration from urban planners ever since. The Cotton District is now one of the most desirable addresses in Starkville, especially for students, a pedestrian-friendly, architecturally varied neighborhood of cottages, duplexes, apartments, street-level shops, courtyards and fountains. – Advertisement – Mr. Camp, who served a term as Starkville mayor from 2005 to 2009, died on Oct. 25 in Meridian, Miss. He was 79. His son Robert said the cause was complications of Covid-19.Robert Daniel Camp was born on April 13, 1941, in Baton Rouge, La., and raised in Tupelo, Miss. His father, Dewey, was a band director, and his mother, Opal Quay (Webb) Camp, was an educator who, the family said, was Elvis Presley’s sixth-grade home room teacher.Mr. Camp graduated from Tupelo High School in 1959, earned a bachelor’s degree in education at Mississippi State in 1963 and received at master’s degree in education at North Carolina State in 1967 before returning to Starkville. He started the Cotton District reinvention with eight small townhouses. – Advertisement –center_img This obituary is part of a series about people who have died in the coronavirus pandemic. Read about others here.When Dan Camp was in graduate school at North Carolina State University in Raleigh in the mid-1960s, a historic building caught his eye. It was a cottage where, at least according to local lore, President Andrew Johnson was born. What struck Mr. Camp was that a relatively compact space could be a perfectly adequate dwelling.- Advertisement – “I suspected that most Americans lived in that type of environment then,” he told Mississippi Magazine in 2001, “so I came home with the idea that those types of dwellings would be an excellent way to build things and offer them to students.”Back home in Mississippi, he settled in Starkville, about 125 miles northeast of Jackson, and became intrigued with the possibilities of a run-down area between the campus of Mississippi State University, where he was teaching in the industrial education department, and the downtown section that became known as the Cotton District, because of the mill that once thrived there. The mill had shut down in 1964, and the nearby millworker housing had deteriorated. “He hired me to paint a mural on his office about 10 minutes after meeting me in early 2014,” Mr. Roy said. “This was in spite of me having no paid experience, no knowledge of how to run a scissor lift and no proper sketch. He liked that the old folks across town hated my work.” – Advertisement –last_img read more

Boyz taking a hit with MLS salaries

first_imgOn the field, Jamaica was better than the United States (US) during Gold Cup 2015. At the bank, however, US internationals are cashing in more than Reggae Boyz in North America’s top professional football competition.According to figures released recently by the union representing players in Major League Soccer (MLS), Jamaicans generally make far less than their American counterparts, which has left some Boyz claiming lack of respect.The disparity was glaring in the Gold Cup semi-final clash. According to MLS Players Union, the 2015 total guaranteed compensation for the five Americans who play in MLS, and who started against Jamaica, was US$12.3 million, averaging US$2.4 million per player. Captain Michael Bradley and Clint Dempsey are guaranteed US$6.5 million and US$4.6 million, respectively. The lowest compensation will go to Gyasi Zardes, with US$223,000.Meanwhile, four Boyz who started against the US are guaranteed a combined US$787,658.33 in MLS compensation this year, an average of US$196,914.58 each.Darren Mattocks of Vancouver Whitecaps and Houston Dynamo’s Giles Barnes, goalscorers in the historic 2-1 win, are Jamaica’s projected top earners, with US$272,000 and US$275,658.33, respectively.Midfielder Je-Vaughn Watson of FC Dallas will get at least US$180,000, while fullback Kemar Lawrence of New York Red Bulls, arguably the tournament’s best defender, is guaranteed US$60,000, close to MLS minimum.Combined, 20 Jamaica representatives scattered across MLS will make some US$2.4 million in guaranteed compensation in 2015. Half will make less than US$100,000 and nine will earn below US$80,000.Current Jamaican players in MLS interviewed for this story requested anonymity, fearing backlash from their clubs. None suggested American players didn’t deserve their compensation, but some believe the Boyz are being overlooked.”(MLS clubs) do not respect Jamaicans at all,” declared one veteran. “They think Jamaicans are not used to money, so they can offer any kind of money and we’ll take it.”Boyz also claim MLS players from North America who make near-minimum are often inferior to Jamaicans making a similar amount.”Other players from Canada and US get low wages, but they are not the same quality as Jamaicans,” said a Reggae Boy.Jamaicans have a proven record of significant MLS contribution, with several being key members of championship-winning teams. Yet top salaries have not followed club success.”For the players coming from the smaller countries, like in the Caribbean, it’s gonna be difficult because … they’re not seen as being world-class players yet,” explained ex-Jamaica international, Tyrone Marshall, who won multiple MLS titles and is currently an assistant coach with Real Salt Lake.Meanwhile, MLS clubs spend heavily on big names, limiting what they can offer unheralded talent, including Jamaicans.”The MLS makes one mistake,” said Winfried Sch‰fer, head coach of Jamaica’s senior national team during the Gold Cup. “They take too many older players and pay them too much money. That is a problem for the development of the players. A big problem.”Brazilian Kaka is guaranteed most compensation in MLS this season – US$7.2 million. Ex-England internationals Steven Gerrard (US$6.3 million) and Frank Lampard (US$6 million), plus Spain’s David Villa (US$5.6 million), also rake in big bucks.Agents have been blamed for some disparity in compensation. Jamaican players believe they are occasionally caught in conflicts of interest.”Representation is a problem,” said a former Jamaican MLS All-Star. “… You’re never sure what’s going on behind closed doors.Jamaicans are, therefore, starting to take keener interest in their contract negotiations.”You have to put your foot down,” one player said.But Jamaican Damani Ralph, a former MLS player and current agent for several Boyz, doesn’t believe Jamaicans in MLS are unfairly targeted with lower compensation.Players’ value, he explained, is tied to several elements, including quality, experience, and exposure. Jamaicans, especially those coming directly out of US colleges or the local Premier League, are viewed as unknown quantities.”There is a structure,” explained Ralph last month. “… People don’t know what they will get out of (the players) at the beginning.”In national striker Deshorn Brown, however, MLS quickly found out. Brown scored 10 goals for Colorado Rapids in each of his first two MLS seasons after US college. This season, Brown plays in Europe after being guaranteed US$123,000 in 2014, according to the union. Ralph, Brown’s agent, denied money was the reason the player left MLS.”The aim was that Deshorn wanted to move to Europe,” he said.Colorado then signed Republic of Ireland striker Kevin Doyle, a former English Premier League (EPL) player. He is guaranteed US$1.2 million in 2015. Doyle had scored two goals in 12 appearances through August 16.Lawrence, sources said, was brought to New York as a backup to a player earning more than three times his compensation. He won the starting job, but ‘Taxi’s’ money metre is stuck on low.”He has outperformed his contract,” said Ralph, who represents Lawrence, “but it’s a contract and he has to honour it.”Former US international Cory Gibbs, an agent with Wasserman Media Group (WMG), which represents some of the biggest names in MLS, including Jamaicans Barnes and Mattocks, doesn’t believe Boyz are being deliberately underpaid either. Gibbs said players like Bradley and Dempsey earned big MLS paydays because of their accomplishments in top leagues and World Cup.”US players have proven themselves at the highest level,” said Gibbs. “… No disrespect, but they’ve built their names.”Slow development of professional football in Jamaica, some Boyz argue, has prevented them from doing the same, leaving little leverage to demand higher pay overseas, despite their talent.”(MLS clubs) like to say we need to establish ourselves,” said a player. “But still, they’d prefer to give big money to players who haven’t produced.”Meanwhile, Jamaican talent is being embraced by MLS. The current batch is possibly the largest ever listed on team rosters for a single season. Five Boyz were selected in the first round of the last two MLS SuperDrafts.But stigma remains. The decision by Alvas Powell (guaranteed US$68,700 in 2015 at Portland Timbers) to leave the national team during the Gold Cup is potentially one.”They (clubs) can say that they can’t invest heavily in players like Jamaicans because they don’t know when they will flip out and walk out,” a former MLS player said.Compensation fortunes for Jamaicans in MLS, however, could soon turn dramatically, following strong performances at Copa AmÈrica and Gold Cup.”The Jamaican player with athleticism, composure, discipline, there’s definitely an upside,” said Gibbs. “… Definitely there’s an upswing (in interest).”Options are opening outside MLS, too. Lawrence, for example, has attracted interest from clubs in top European leagues”If players have quality, they don’t have to play in MLS,” said Ralph, recalling his own decision to move to Russia years ago.Leagues like in Vietnam, for example, offer promising packages. Lower profiled Jamaican players in the “V League” have reportedly earned more than US$100,000 a season – after deductions. Ralph admitted Jamaicans’ MLS value could improve.”Market value of the Jamaican players is not what it needs to be,” he said.Barnes, whose club contract ends after this season, could be an early indicator if change is coming. Unconfirmed sources claim the striker is seeking more than $1 million next season.Barnes declined to discuss the issue during Gold Cup.Late last month, Gibbs didn’t confirm or deny that figure but declared the striker “put himself in a good situation” with recent international performances.So did other Boyz. If MLS doesn’t pay, someone else just may.”There are options out there; options that would surprise people,” said Jamaican agent, Baron ‘Mosiah’ Marshall, who has represented several Boyz in Vietnam and listed China, India, Thailand, and Malaysia among possibilities.”Everything,” Gibbs said, “is about supply and demand.”last_img read more

Court asked to give interim payment to victims of Humboldt Broncos bus

first_imgSASKATOON – A court hearing has been rescheduled for Aug. 15 to provide victims of the Humboldt Broncos bus crash with $50,000 each from a massive fundraising campaign.The Humboldt Broncos Memorial Fund Inc. will ask the Saskatchewan Court of Queen’s Bench to approve the interim payment to the 13 survivors and the families of the 16 people who died after the April 6 crash.“There are affidavit materials filed that establish that certain … families of persons who were travelling on the bus at the time of the accident have suffered financial hardship and require some relief against that — and that’s the purpose of the distribution,” said Jeff Lee, a lawyer who represents the fund.A GoFundMe campaign was created immediately after the crash and received $15.2 million in donations from all over the world.Saskatchewan has legislation known as the Informal Public Appeals Act, which outlines a court-supervised process to support the distribution of crowdfunding donations.The hearing on how to distribute the money, which was initially set for Aug. 13, was rescheduled at the request of the court.Lee said he will also ask the court to approve a committee made up of retired judge Dennis Ball; Mark Chipman, chairman of the company that owns the Winnipeg Jets; Olympic gold medallist Hayley Wickenheiser; Dr. Peter Spafford, who’s in charge of head and neck surgery at the University of Saskatchewan’s College of Medicine; and Kevin Cameron, executive director of the Canadian Centre for Threat Assessment and Trauma Response.That committee would prepare a report with recommendations to the memorial fund board on how to distribute the rest of the money.“The objective would be to have the recommendations come back within 60 days after the Aug. 15 court hearing and then see the matter in court shortly thereafter for a final disposition,” said Lee.The court documents state the non-profit group has received free professional services from its law firm, bank and accountants.GoFundMe has deducted roughly $483,000 from the money raised to cover 2.9 per cent payment processing fees. An additional $49,000 is being held back by GoFundMe in a temporary reserve in case any donors challenge their contribution.last_img read more

Hot Takedown for March 24 2015 Vintage Michigan State Fixing The Womens

More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed Embed Code Links to what we discuss in this week’s show:FiveThirtyEight’s continually updated March Madness predictions.Ken Pomeroy’s college basketball ratings.FiveThirtyEight’s ongoing March Madness reporting.Michigan State’s historical SRS ratings.The “white paper” prepared by Val Ackerman on the state of women’s college basketball.How the Celtics are trying to balance the middle ground between tanking and greatness.New Zealand reaches the Cricket World Cup final for the first time. Welcome to this week’s episode of Hot Takedown, our podcast where the hot sports takes of the week meet the numbers that prove them right or tear them down. This week, we discuss the first weekend of March Madness and why Tom Izzo’s Michigan State teams always seem to beat expectations; whether the Princeton women, even in defeat, showed that they were criminally under-seeded; the rumors that the Oklahoma City Thunder may trade Kevin Durant before he bolts through free agency; and what it would take for cricket to go mainstream in the U.S.Stream the episode by clicking play above, or subscribe using one of the podcast clients below. By Chadwick Matlin, Kate Fagan, Neil Paine and Jody Avirgan If you’re a fan of our podcasts, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave a rating/review. That helps spread the word to other listeners. And get in touch by email, on Twitter or in the comments. Tell us what you think, send us hot takes to discuss and tell us why we’re wrong.CORRECTION (March 25, 12:14 p.m.): In this week’s podcast, we incorrectly said the Cricket World Cup uses the T20 format for matches. It uses the typical One Day International format, which gives each side 50 overs. That is still much shorter than the traditional “test” matches, but longer than T20, in which each side gets 20 overs. read more

Lance Armstrong to Admit Drug Use to Oprah

Lance Armstrong plans to admit to doping throughout his career during an upcoming interview with talk show host Oprah Winfrey, USA Today reported late Friday.The interview, scheduled to be taped Monday and broadcast Thursday night on the Oprah Winfrey Network, will be conducted at Armstrong’s home in Austin, Texas.Citing an anonymous source, USA Today reported that the disgraced cyclist plans to admit to using performance-enhancing drugs, but likely will not get into details of the allegations outlined in a 2012 report by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. The report led to Armstrong being stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life from the sport.Armstrong representatives, including his attorney Tim Herman, declined comment. The New York Times first reported last week that Armstrong was considering making a confession.Armstrong, 41, who vehemently denied doping for years, has not spoken publicly about the USADA report that cast him as the leader of a sophisticated and brazen doping program on his U.S. Postal Service teams that included use of steroids, blood boosters and illegal blood transfusions.Winfrey’s network announced Tuesday that Armstrong agreed to a “no holds barred” interview with her.A confession to Winfrey would come at a time when some of Armstrong’s legal troubles appear to be clearing up.Any potential perjury charges stemming from his sworn testimony denying doping in a 2005 arbitration fight with a Dallas promotions company over a contract bonus worth $7.5 million have passed the statute of limitations.Armstrong faces a whistle-blower lawsuit filed by former teammate Floyd Landis accusing him of defrauding the U.S. Postal Service, but the U.S. Department of Justice has yet to announce whether it will join the case. The British newspaper The Sunday Times is suing Armstrong to recover about $500,000 it paid him to settle a libel lawsuit.Armstrong lost most of his personal sponsorship — worth tens of millions of dollars — after USADA issued its report, and he left the board of the Livestrong cancer-fighting charity he founded in 1997. He is said to still be worth an estimated $100 million.Livestrong might be one reason to issue an apology or make a confession. The charity supports cancer patients and faces an image problem because of its association with its famous founder.The New York Times reported Armstrong might make a confession in an attempt to return to competition in elite triathlon or running events, but World Anti-Doping Code rules state his lifetime ban cannot be reduced to less than eight years. WADA and U.S. Anti-Doping officials could agree to reduce the ban further depending on what new information Armstrong provides and his level of cooperation.Armstrong met with USADA officials recently to explore a “pathway to redemption,” according to a report by “60 Minutes Sports” aired Wednesday on Showtime. read more

Nielsen Expositions Up For Sale

first_imgNielsen Expositions generated $183 million in revenue in 2011, or about 3 percent of Nielsen Holdings’ total, according to the company’s annual report.Nielsen reported fourth quarter and year-end results last month, posting 3-percent and 1-percent revenue gains overall. Its expo segment rose 2 percent for the year, but took a 19-percent hit in Q4. The company attributed the loss to the timing of its shows.Among the unit’s major holdings are ASD, the Hospitality Design Expo (HD Expo), the Kitchen & Bath Industry Show (KBIS), the Outdoor Retailer Summer and Winter Markets and Interbike. According to its annual report, Nielsen Expositions has more than 40 events spread across 20 industries and connects 300,000 buyers and sellers each year.The story comes just two weeks after FOLIO: sister mag Expo learned Cygnus Business Media had put its agricultural group up for sale.Credit Suisse Group AG has been named as the bank working with Nielsen, according to Bloomberg.com.Stay with FOLIO: for updates.Stay updated on the latest FOLIO: news, follow us on Facebook & Twitter! Nielsen Holdings NV has hired an investment bank to explore a sale of its tradeshow and event wing, Nielsen Expositions, multiple sources are reporting.Nielsen Expositions President David Loechner declined comment.According to various sources, the parent company wishes to concentrate on its core audience measurement business.last_img read more

How an OldSchool Handyman Used an App to Repair His Business

first_img 3 min read Handyman Ramon “Ray” Gonzales III admits he was living up to his profession’s negative reputation: archaic business practices and scattershot reliability. Six months after launching Hey Ray Handyman in Nashville, Tenn., he was falling behind on trafficking and tracking invoices and estimates, communicating with clients and collecting payments. And he was showing up late for appointments. His makeshift mobile office—consisting of a dog-eared appointment calendar and loose-leaf notebook—wasn’t cutting it. “The way I was running my business was really old-fashioned, and I was losing a lot because of it,” Gonzales says. The fixSearching for a mobile app that could help, Gonzales discovered Breezeworks, an iOS and Android micro-business organizing program. For a monthly fee of $20, the app helps mobile solopreneurs, small-business operators and franchisees (up to 20 users) manage scheduling, appointments, client and internal communications, invoicing, payment processing and bid and job status. In other words, it puts the stuff that all service professionals—from plumbers to photographers to landscapers—see as necessary evils into the one tool that never leaves their side: their phone. The resultsGonzales knew he was onto something good when he received an alert from Breezeworks telling him he needed to be at a job in 45 minutes, and that given current traffic conditions it would take him 32 minutes to get there. “I arrived 10 minutes early, and the guy told me, ‘You’re my handyman from now on,’” he recalls.Admittedly tech-challenged, Gonzales says it took him less than an hour to get up and running on Breezeworks, and only a few days to get comfortable using the program. “It has saved me a lot of stress with handling appointments alone,” he says. “It has literally saved me hours, even days, of work a week with my receipts, my invoicing and my books. It keeps me organized and gives a professional front to my brand that I think really sets me apart from the competition.” A second opinionWith its ability to coordinate, automate and track essential business functions and customer touchpoints in a timely, professional fashion, all via smartphone, a mobile platform like Breezeworks provides an immediate competitive advantage in fields that are “always way behind the [technology] curve,” says Paul Sanneman, founder of Dream Business Coaching in Novato, Calif. Sanneman, who consults with construction contractors as well as other service professionals, believes the hardest part about Breezeworks is getting the tech-averse to change their behavior and actually use it. “If you’re in an industry that’s slow to adopt technology,” he says, “you can leap ahead of the competition for very little money, just by being an early adopter.”  March 26, 2015 Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals This story appears in the April 2015 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » Register Now »last_img read more