Shumlin and Legislature move swiftly to pass Budget Adjustment Bill

first_imgGovernor Peter Shumlin today signed the state’s Budget Adjustment Bill, a milestone for progress in the legislative session. The  governor noted that this is the earliest date any governor had signed this legislation in at least a decade, and complimented the leadership in the House and the Senate for moving swiftly to affordably address the needs of Vermonters.‘We arrived at the State House in January aware of the difficult spending decisions facing Vermont,’ Gov. Shumlin said. ‘My administration and the House and Senate worked overtime to ensure this spending adjustment for the current year is affordable for taxpayers, yet meets our most pressing needs.’The bill for the current fiscal year includes:·          Approximately $19 million from the federal Jobs Bill to help schools meet budget constraints;·         $500,000 to combat homelessness in Vermont — $300,000 in grants directly to shelters, and $200,000 in General Assistance to help renters avoid eviction due to late payment, and assist with housing deposits to move homeless Vermonters into housing;·         $700,000 to provide assistance to Vermonters with traumatic brain injuries through the Department of Disabilities, Aging and Independent Living; and·         $280,000 to the Department for Children and Families to provide living assistance to the aged, blind and disabled.The Budget Adjustment Bill is an annual act that makes a mid-course correction to this year’s spending plan based on changes in the challenges facing Vermont since lawmakers approved a current-year budget the previous spring. In all, this bill proposes a relatively small spending increase of about $6 million in total spending for the year. The bill also includes some spending reductions created by caseload changes or other program shifts.‘We have challenging decisions to make in this building moving forward,’ Gov. Shumlin said. ‘It is imperative that ‘ just as we did in passing the Budget Adjustment Bill ‘ we work cooperatively to balance the needs of Vermonters with their ability to pay for those services.’ Source: MONTPELIER ‘ 2.17.2011last_img read more

The whistleblower’s story

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