Yellow zone rules latest for schools, churches

first_img“For one experience, one set of rows will be available, the other set will be closed, and we’ll rotate those,” Hampton said Monday. “We sanitize in between experiences, allowing people to use the environment without ever having any cross contamination and having adequate space.” In his briefing Monday, Gov. Cuomo did not discuss yellow zones or schools. What we don’t know at this time is how districts partially in the yellow zone will have to comply to the restrictions, either on a school by school basis or the full district. Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that 20% of all in-person students, teachers and staff in the yellow zone would have to be tested for coronavirus once a week, beginning on Friday, October 16. (WBNG) — While many questions still remain, 12 News has obtained more information about the governor’s yellow zone restrictions.center_img Hampton said remaining open is crucial to his congregation, as many of his members are in recovery and struggle with isolation. One thing that is for certain is houses of worship are limited to a 50% capacity. The lead pastor at Two Rivers Church in Johnson City, Will Hampton, said his church is only operating at 33% capacity, one of the many measures he said has led to 0 positive cases in his congregation so far.last_img read more

​Ilmarinen predicts big 2020 year-on-year fall in contributions

first_imgJouko Pölönen, Ilmarinen’s chief executive officer, said: “In the second quarter, Ilmarinen’s investment portfolio yielded 5.9% and solvency strengthened to 124% as the equity markets recovered rapidly from the dramatic stock price plummet caused by the corona pandemic earlier in the year.”Equity investments ended the six-month period with a -4.2% return and fixed income investments finished with a -2.9% return, he said, while alternative assets turned out to be the best performers generating a positive result of 10.6%, and real estate returned 1.8%.The total result for the pension fund – which is the largest of the four mutual pension insurance companies in Finland’s earnings-related pension scheme – was -€1.1bn, compared with the €931m profit registered at last year’s halfway point.Total assets fell to €48.8bn at the end of June from €50.5bn the end of last year.Pölönen said “strong development” in cost-effectiveness had continued in the first half and operating expenses financed using loading income declined by €7m from the corresponding period last year.Commenting on the pandemic, Pölönen said Finland had been successful in limiting human suffering during the first wave of the pandemic, but acknowledged that the virus continued to spread globally, with a “worrying growth trend” in infection figures in some European countries.“A key factor in terms of future development is how well a resurgence of the virus can be prevented without extensive lockdown measures, which would exacerbate the economic crisis and unemployment,” said Pölönen.Looking for IPE’s latest magazine? Read the digital edition here. Ilmarinen reported a 2% loss on its investment portfolio in the first half of this year, and the Finnish pensions insurance company warned full-year contribution inflows would be much lower than last year because of effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.Releasing its January-to-June financial report, Ilmarinen said premiums written fell to €2.7bn from €2.9bn in the same period last year, as a result of an increase in temporary layoffs and a temporary discount to the statutory TyEL contributions from employers.Commenting on the outlook for the full year, the pension provider said: “Owing to growing unemployment and the temporary discount on employers’ TyEL contributions, premiums written will fall considerably year-on-year.”Investment returns ended the first half in the red for the Helsinki-based institution, despite having rebounded between April and June.last_img read more

Inadequate Funds Hamper Renovation

first_imgRenovation work at the Sports Commission, on Broad Street is proceeding gradually but lack of funds will make the project incomplete.Liberia Basketball Association President Rufus Anderson told the Daily Observer yesterday that the project is being done partially.“We are replacing a portion of the sitting area with concrete,” he said, “but the top portion will not be done due to inadequate funds.”Though he was unable to say how much the renovation would cost the LBA, the job is proceeding as expected.“The breakdown of expenditure is already sent to all clubs,” Anderson said, but explained that he could not say how much the project would cost.On a projected cost, Anderson could still not come up with a figure, but said, “Go to Samukai he has a copy.”He was making reference to the owner of K-Delta female basketball team, Mr. Abraham Samukai, who responded to a telephone interview yesterday, “I’m yet to receive a copy of the breakdown of the project.”A construction worker at the Sports Commission had initially argued that our reporter did not have the authorization to take pictures of the ongoing work at the Sports Commission.Though he did not say whether his argument was a directive from the Liberia Basketball Association, he still insisted that our reporter needed authorization from the LBA to take pictures of the on-going work.President Anderson, who was reviewing the project yesterday during the argument, asked our reporter if he had taken any pictures of the ongoing work at the commission. The answer was negative, and our reporter asked him, “How do we get authorization from the LBA to report on the progress of your renovation work here, Mr. Anderson?”Without providing any verbal answer, he instructed our reporter to go ahead and get the pictures he wanted.However, he did not educate the construction worker why it was necessary to cooperate with sports writers who would visit the Commission, and wanting to gather information, including pictures for publication.“That’s strange,” said a bystander who witnessed the exchanges, “at least Anderson should have told the worker that he cannot stop journalists to do their work at public places.”Perhaps the construction worker’s action stemmed from the current impasse on the leadership of the LBA. Aggrieved basketball owners are at loggerheads with Anderson’s administration and the crisis has been ongoing since 2014.“Anderson has avoided the media for some time,” said another basketball player who has followed the development of the leadership crisis, “he must have improved relations with the media.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more