Trump’s national security strategy has real promise

first_imgCategories: Editorial, OpinionIt seems odd that Dean Acheson, one of history’s great diplomats, felt a need to explain why he wrote a memoir of his years at the State Department — the masterpiece “Present at the Creation,” published in 1969. In those pages, Acheson chronicled a dozen of the most consequential years in world history: the wrecking of civilization in World War II and the building, atop the rubble, of an alliance for liberty that has given humanity its longest period of great-power peace since the Roman Empire. A fascinating, chilling report in the new issue of Wired magazine shows how rapidly the Chinese economy has moved to mobile-phone payments — and how easily that change is being leveraged into a network to track every movement and activity of the Chinese people.Vast databases are being compiled, containing everything from DNA to college aptitude tests, shopping histories to social circles.Those Chinese who pursue party-approved lives will be rewarded, while free-thinking dissent meets stern punishment.The BBC reports that China will have more than half a billion surveillance cameras installed by 2020, using artificial intelligence to recognize faces. “We can match every face with an ID card and trace all of your movements back one week in time. We can match your face with your car, match you with your relatives and the people you’re in touch with,” Yin Jun of Dahua Technology told a BBC reporter. “With enough cameras we can know who you frequently meet.”Without doubt, this all-seeing state will use its data to deepen the repression of its people.Among Xi’s first acts upon gaining power in 2013 was a crackdown on non-party civil society. Acheson wrote, he explained, because the 1960s “have brought the country, and particularly its young people, to a mood of depression, disillusion, and withdrawal.”In such a moment, he felt it important to “tell a tale of large conceptions, great achievements, and some failures, the product of enormous will and effort.”We find ourselves in a similar moment, profoundly disillusioned, anxious as well as depressed, apparently eager to withdraw from world leadership into heated discussions of trysting FBI agents and the president’s consumption of diet soda. Yet the world presses in.Even with an economy in tatters (the GDP of Russia is barely half that of France, despite having twice the population), Vladimir Putin rules like a czar while waging a cyberwar on the West, seeding chaos and fomenting division.Worse, Chinese dictator Xi Jinping in October announced plans to tighten his grip on a nation once again leaning toward totalitarianism, and to directly challenge the United States and its allies for global influence. If you like Big Brother, you’re going to love what Xi has planned for China. Arrests and denunciations have followed; in July, writer and human rights activist Liu Xiaobo died in custody, becoming the first Nobel Peace Prize recipient since the Nazi era to die a prisoner. Today, as in the days when Acheson executed the bold decisions of President Harry S. Truman, the world has no good alternative to American leadership.That’s why President Trump’s inaugural address was so disheartening to many of us.Trump seemed to reject the idea of mutually beneficial alliances and partnerships in support of free people and free markets, and against collectivist tyrannies.But glimmers of hope showed from the National Security Strategy published by the White House on Monday.Though it’s not a perfect document, the strategy takes several strides in the right direction, acknowledging Russia’s hostile schemes, identifying the long-term China challenge and beginning to reconcile Trump’s “America first” rhetoric with the imperative to rebuild, renew and expand Team Liberty around the world.“Some of the greatest triumphs of American statecraft resulted from helping fragile and developing countries become successful societies,” the paper declares in a welcome rejection of the zero-sum Bannonism of the early Trump administration. “These successes, in turn, created profitable markets for American businesses, allies to help achieve favorable regional balances of power, and coalition partners to share burdens and address a variety of problems around the world.”The task of bracing ourselves and our allies for the work ahead is more difficult than it might have been without Trump’s impulsiveness and base pandering over the past year.But on the bright side, the president has arrived at a national security team capable of producing a tempered, resolute and wide-ranging strategy on a tight time frame.If Trump will rely on it for information and advice — rather than on the whims and cranks that periodically distract his attention like jangling keys — there is time yet to repair the foreign policy damage of the recent past and start in the right direction.The next volume of our history need not be “Present at the Destruction.”David Von Drehle writes a twice-weekly column for The Washington Post. He was previously an editor-at-large for Time Magazine.More from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

Syracuse women’s basketball recovers from sloppy start to dominate Siena, 102-65

first_img Published on November 14, 2016 at 9:40 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 Blood dripped from Brittney Sykes’ face as the redshirt senior slapped the side of the baseline panel and took a seat. One minute into the night, she had sustained what appeared to be an elbow to the lip and was forced out of the game.In her absence, Siena exploded to a 9-0 run. Ninety seconds of action saw Alexis Peterson get stripped and SU air ball 3-pointers.Midway through the first quarter, without one of its star players, Syracuse trailed by six.But eight seconds into the second, Gabby Cooper drilled a 3 from the right wing, sparking a 14-1 run. The spurt supercharged No. 14 Syracuse’s (2-0) offense to a 29-9 second quarter outburst. After a deadlocked 20-20 opening frame, the Orange dominated Siena (0-1), 102-65, Monday night in the Carrier Dome.“It’s tough because this is their first game so we had last year’s tapes,” Syracuse head coach Quentin Hillsman said, referencing SU’s film study on Siena. “We kind of just had to play a little bit.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSU scored 100 points for the first time since 2013 and racked up at least 95 points for the second-consecutive game to start the year. By game’s end, Isabella Slim (16 points), Sykes (18), Briana Day (19), Peterson (19), Cooper (11) and Jade Phillips (10) had contributed double-figure scoring.Returning its top four scorers from a year ago, Siena came out strong in the first quarter. Jackie Benitez repeatedly hit pull-up jumpers to keep the Saints in it. While Siena’s leading scorer in 2015-16, junior point guard Kollyns Scarbrough, was held to nine points, the Saints converted on chances, shooting 50 percent from the field in the first. Syracuse, meanwhile, played sloppily in the opening minutes against a team that has had only one winning season over the last decade.The Orange got its shots but the only uncertainty was how many it’d knock down. SU went just 6-for-16 from the field. Even in the 29-point second quarter, Syracuse shot only 35 percent from the field. Where it thrived was in shot generation, tallying 31 shots and hitting on 11.Syracuse paced the floor in the second quarter and beyond, applied pressure defensively and chucked up shots — something it had not done in the opening 10 minutes. The Orange switched from a three-quarter-court defense to full court. In the half court, SU extended farther than it did in the first — near the midcourt line — to pressure Siena guards. When backup guards came on, Syracuse suffocated the Saints offense.“Our point guards got in some foul trouble, which hurt,” Siena head coach Ali Jaques said. “I think it caused some tentativeness.”Even when SU sagged off, the Saints could hardly get shots off. They scored just two points inside the paint and shot only 1-for-11 in the second quarter.Cooper’s early 3-pointer sparked the run. From the wing, Sykes threw a dart to Day’s chest. Day made an up-and-under move for the basket. A couple of possessions later, Sykes cut to the dish for two. Then she maneuvered her way around Siena center Meghan Donohue for a bucket down low.Phillips drilled a slight-fade away 3 from the wing, pulling her hands down. Syracuse head coach Quentin Hillsman took a sip of water and shook his head with a light chuckle. A Day to Sykes alley-oop layup off an inbound pass followed.Toward the end of the quarter, Chelayne Bailey drove from the wing, drawing a second defender before she slotted a pass to Isabella Slim for two points. Syracuse jogged into the locker room up 49-29 at the half, turning a tie game into one that would soon be out of reach. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Lakers’ Jeanie Buss ‘surprised’ Magic Johnson resigned … but she doesn’t blame him

first_img“It was a surprise when Magic turned in his resignation,” Buss told reporters at the NBA Awards Show. “I didn’t see that coming.”As surprising as it was, it kind of reminded me of back in 1981 when he asked to be traded after winning a championship with the Lakers because he wasn’t happy with the way the offense had changed. That led us to getting Pat Riley as our head coach. Related News Magic Johnson denies report he was toxic to Lakers Magic Johnson looks into crystal ball, dissects 2020 Lakers “So he’s got good instincts. He’s got to stay true to who he is and do what’s right for him. I wish I would’ve had a little bit more notice, but I think we’re going to be just fine.”The Lakers are now in the hands of general manager Rob Pelinka. Johnson told ESPN last month the former agent had been “backstabbing” him, which Pelinka quickly denied. Whatever happened between the two men, Buss said she is comfortable with Pelinka guiding the franchise’s future.”I’ve always had confidence in Rob, whatever the speculation is out there,” Buss said. “We don’t need outside media to validate the things that we do. I’m very happy and I think we’re on the right path.”center_img Magic Johnson takes four tweets to congratulate Rob Pelinka for Anthony Davis trade Magic Johnson’s abrupt resignation as Lakers president of basketball operations on April 9 stunned the NBA, but team owner Jeanie Buss said Monday she doesn’t blame him.Finally addressing the issue for the first time Monday, Buss admitted Johnson’s resignation was surprising.last_img read more