Trump’s national security strategy has real promise

first_imgCategories: Editorial, OpinionIt seems odd that Dean Acheson, one of history’s great diplomats, felt a need to explain why he wrote a memoir of his years at the State Department — the masterpiece “Present at the Creation,” published in 1969. In those pages, Acheson chronicled a dozen of the most consequential years in world history: the wrecking of civilization in World War II and the building, atop the rubble, of an alliance for liberty that has given humanity its longest period of great-power peace since the Roman Empire. A fascinating, chilling report in the new issue of Wired magazine shows how rapidly the Chinese economy has moved to mobile-phone payments — and how easily that change is being leveraged into a network to track every movement and activity of the Chinese people.Vast databases are being compiled, containing everything from DNA to college aptitude tests, shopping histories to social circles.Those Chinese who pursue party-approved lives will be rewarded, while free-thinking dissent meets stern punishment.The BBC reports that China will have more than half a billion surveillance cameras installed by 2020, using artificial intelligence to recognize faces. “We can match every face with an ID card and trace all of your movements back one week in time. We can match your face with your car, match you with your relatives and the people you’re in touch with,” Yin Jun of Dahua Technology told a BBC reporter. “With enough cameras we can know who you frequently meet.”Without doubt, this all-seeing state will use its data to deepen the repression of its people.Among Xi’s first acts upon gaining power in 2013 was a crackdown on non-party civil society. Acheson wrote, he explained, because the 1960s “have brought the country, and particularly its young people, to a mood of depression, disillusion, and withdrawal.”In such a moment, he felt it important to “tell a tale of large conceptions, great achievements, and some failures, the product of enormous will and effort.”We find ourselves in a similar moment, profoundly disillusioned, anxious as well as depressed, apparently eager to withdraw from world leadership into heated discussions of trysting FBI agents and the president’s consumption of diet soda. Yet the world presses in.Even with an economy in tatters (the GDP of Russia is barely half that of France, despite having twice the population), Vladimir Putin rules like a czar while waging a cyberwar on the West, seeding chaos and fomenting division.Worse, Chinese dictator Xi Jinping in October announced plans to tighten his grip on a nation once again leaning toward totalitarianism, and to directly challenge the United States and its allies for global influence. If you like Big Brother, you’re going to love what Xi has planned for China. Arrests and denunciations have followed; in July, writer and human rights activist Liu Xiaobo died in custody, becoming the first Nobel Peace Prize recipient since the Nazi era to die a prisoner. Today, as in the days when Acheson executed the bold decisions of President Harry S. Truman, the world has no good alternative to American leadership.That’s why President Trump’s inaugural address was so disheartening to many of us.Trump seemed to reject the idea of mutually beneficial alliances and partnerships in support of free people and free markets, and against collectivist tyrannies.But glimmers of hope showed from the National Security Strategy published by the White House on Monday.Though it’s not a perfect document, the strategy takes several strides in the right direction, acknowledging Russia’s hostile schemes, identifying the long-term China challenge and beginning to reconcile Trump’s “America first” rhetoric with the imperative to rebuild, renew and expand Team Liberty around the world.“Some of the greatest triumphs of American statecraft resulted from helping fragile and developing countries become successful societies,” the paper declares in a welcome rejection of the zero-sum Bannonism of the early Trump administration. “These successes, in turn, created profitable markets for American businesses, allies to help achieve favorable regional balances of power, and coalition partners to share burdens and address a variety of problems around the world.”The task of bracing ourselves and our allies for the work ahead is more difficult than it might have been without Trump’s impulsiveness and base pandering over the past year.But on the bright side, the president has arrived at a national security team capable of producing a tempered, resolute and wide-ranging strategy on a tight time frame.If Trump will rely on it for information and advice — rather than on the whims and cranks that periodically distract his attention like jangling keys — there is time yet to repair the foreign policy damage of the recent past and start in the right direction.The next volume of our history need not be “Present at the Destruction.”David Von Drehle writes a twice-weekly column for The Washington Post. He was previously an editor-at-large for Time Magazine.More from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

Mercer starts master trust for UK DB schemes

first_imgInvestment consultant Mercer has launched its UK Mercer DB Master Trust, which offers defined benefit (DB) pension plan sponsors the potential for “enhanced governance and economies of scale to deliver better outcomes for members”, it said.Under the trust, Mercer will be responsible for providing all services including investment with fiduciary management, journey planning, actuarial services, covenant assessment, scheme management and administration, with trusteeship provided by independent professional trustees.The employer would maintain ultimate responsibility for the funding of the scheme, an announcement stated.This new solution adds to Mercer’s existing advisory and fiduciary offerings and ensures clients can access a full spectrum of approaches to select the best fit for their individual governance needs, it said. Benoit Hudon, leader of Mercer’s wealth business in the UK, said: “Managing employee pension schemes has become increasingly complex and many organisations suffer from time or cost constraints.”He said these challenges are “particularly acute” for smaller or mid-sized legacy DB schemes where often dedicated in-house expertise lacks, while access to best-in-class capabilities can be expensive.He added that the trust will “potentially reduce fees and improve outcomes”, while also giving members access to the largest administration of private sector pensions in the UK.The Mercer DB Master Trust has evolved from the Federated Pension Plan (FPP), an existing and long-established master trust initially set up by Jardine Lloyd Thompson that currently has around £260m (€280m) of assets and 73 participating employers.Additionally, Independent Trustee Services (ITS) and PTL have been appointed as additional professional trustees to work alongside PAN Trustees, which has been FPP’s trustee for more than 15 years.To read the digital edition of IPE’s latest magazine click here.last_img read more

Syracuse erases last season’s painful memories with comeback win over Missouri, becomes bowl eligible

first_img Related Stories BOWLED OVER: Syracuse stuns Missouri with late touchdown, clinches bowl eligibility for 2nd time in 3 yearsGallery: Syracuse gains bowl eligibility with 31-27 win at Missouri COLUMBIA, Mo. — This year, there was no free fall. Only resilience.As Syracuse flooded Faurot Field inside Memorial Stadium late Saturday night, the joy of a bowl-clinching upset was made sweeter by last season’s failures. Five straight losses, increasingly poor performances, a despair-filled trip from the top of the Big East to bowl-less irrelevance.It spelled turmoil within a program only one year removed from its first bowl appearance since 2004, and it pained a coach who blamed himself for every miscue.“The last half of last season left a bad taste in a lot of young guys’ mouths and a lot of upcoming seniors, which is guys like me,” Syracuse defensive tackle Deon Goggins said. “We never wanted to be in that position again.”Saturday’s win ensured that Goggins, a senior, never will be.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textRelying on a never-say-die attitude that was absent one season ago, Syracuse (6-5, 4-2 Big East) erased a double-digit deficit on Saturday on the road against Missouri (5-6, 2-5 Southeastern Conference) to earn its sixth win and become bowl eligible for the first time since 2010. The 31-27 win, which came on a last-second scoring drive and stunned the crowd of 63,045, was the Orange’s fourth win in its last five games at a point in time where it imploded last year.Instead of the disheartened and agitated Marrone from 2011, Saturday’s version of the Syracuse head coach was pleased and relieved. “If I have to start off with a statement — oof, what a game,” Marrone said, as he smiled throughout much of his postgame press conference.He’s transformed a team that was once 2-4 overall into a legitimate contender in the Big East, and by beating the Tigers he guided the Orange to its first win over a team from the SEC since September of 2001.“I can’t tell you how proud I am of these kids,” Marrone said. “The leadership, the stuff on the sideline when you look in their eyes, the confidence that’s building in them.”And on Saturday, that confidence began to build after halftime when the Syracuse defense finally slowed down Missouri and quarterback James Franklin. The Tigers had stormed out of the gates in the first quarter, surging to a 17-3 lead by slicing the Orange secondary for chunks of yards at a time.But a late touchdown drive by Syracuse closed the gap to seven before halftime, and the tweaks made by defensive coordinator Scott Shafer yielded zero third-quarter points.“Coach Shafer is a great defensive coordinator that is great at getting our adjustments down so we can go out there and just play,” Goggins said. “And that’s what you saw in the second half, our adjustments and just going out in the second half and playing.”By the 14-minute mark of the fourth quarter, the Orange had rallied back to tie the game at 17-17. And after the Tigers marched downfield for another touchdown, Syracuse matched them once again. Running back Jerome Smith sprinted eight yards up the middle for the tying score, which elicited an emphatic fist pump from offensive line coach Greg Adkins on the sideline.Despite a hostile environment and an opponent with arguably more individual talent, the Orange responded not once, but twice in a 10-minute span.“That comes with just leadership, great leadership,” SU safety Shamarko Thomas said. “I feel like last year was different from this year. We have great leaders in Ryan Nassib, Alec Lemon, Justin Pugh and Siriki Diabate and me. And it just came out and showed.”So on a third-and-1 play with less than two minutes remaining, Thomas and Diabate anchored the biggest defensive stop of the game. With the Tigers already in field goal range, a first down would have allowed them to run down the clock and attempt a game-winning field goal. But the Orange stuffed Missouri running back Kendial Lawrence for a three-yard loss, forcing a field goal by Andrew Baggett.It gave the ball to Nassib with 1:43 remaining and an opportunity to display the fortitude that Syracuse lacked over the final half of 2011. Seven plays later, the Orange found the end zone, with Lemon hauling in a 17-yard score to secure the win.“It’s incredible,” Lemon said. “This is all the hard work that we put in to go to a bowl game.”It’s work that many of the players have admitted was neglected last season. A blowout win over West Virginia midway through the year prompted relaxation, they said, and shifted eyes to the bigger picture instead of the immediate future.Saturday night undid all that, erasing painful memories and ensuring the Orange will have a 13th game. It allowed Marrone to smile and Thomas to beam and offensive coordinator Nathaniel Hackett to gush.But more important than that it allowed Cameron Lynch to roll along the turf — imitating a certain type of ball — once the final Missouri pass was intercepted.Said Lynch: “That was bowling, baby.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on November 18, 2012 at 8:36 am Contact Michael: mjcohe02@syr.edu | @Michael_Cohen13last_img read more

Little Silver Seniors’ Club Ending After Nearly 20 Years

first_imgBy Greg Scharen Linda Rizzo, a membersince 2003, was in charge ofhospitality, organizing thefood, beverages and locationsfor the club’s luncheons, acrucial role. Hosting live music and entertainment each week, the club provided a community for people of a certain age to interact with one another, meeting in the Little Silver Borough Hall and Women’s Club. The seniors’ club also hosted luncheons and boat trips throughout the years and focused on service to the community, working with Lunch Break in Red Bank and other organizations to help build a community outside of their own. Seniors of Little Silverstarted out small but grew to72 members at its high point.It then shrank to 42 membersand had a hard time fillingthe governing board seats. The independent social club is disbanding due to lack of support and the advancing age of many integral members, said Symons. “I’m heartbroken,” said Louise Symons, an active club member, echoing similar sentiments of others involved in the club, as they move on from this venture. center_img Symons wanted to thankall of the current and pastmembers of Seniors of LittleSilver for their dedication. After 19 years, the Seniors of Little Silver is ending its run. The club’s final luncheon will be held at noon June 25 at the Molly Pitcher Inn in Red Bank. The club was funded through member dues each year and a variety of 50/50 raffles held throughout the years, but suffered from a lack of identity since membership was open to people residing outside Little Silver. The club began in 2000 with adjunct founder Julia Aymonier and 18 senior residents of Little Silver. Joining later were Symons, Diane Tresente, Rene O’Neil and the senior’s first president Ann Hansen, all of whom have been a driving force in keeping the club going. last_img read more

Roberto Pereyra expects tough Chelsea test on Boxing Day

first_imgWatford midfielder Roberto Pereyra says he’s expecting a tough test when Chelsea visit the Vicarage Road on Boxing Day.The Argentina international insists the Blues are a different team under the tutelage of Maurizio Sarri and he’s prepared for a high-intensity affair on Wednesday.“There are always a great team, especially with Sarri this season they have improved a lot,” said Pereyra, according to the club’s official website.“They have more intensity and possession in midfield. It will be a very tough game for us.”Pereyra scored the Hornets’ fourth goal in their 4-1 home win against Chelsea last season, with the Javi Gracia’s men scoring three after Eden Hazard leveled the scores at 1-1.The former Juventus player is well aware of the threat that the Belgian captain poses.Tammy Abraham, ChelseaChelsea hat-trick hero Tammy Abraham hopes for more Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Tammy Abraham hopes this season will be his big breakthrough at Chelsea after firing his first hat-trick for the club in Saturday’s 5-2 win at Wolves.“The Premier League has lots of great players, and we need to be ready to face him,” said the midfielder.“We are aware of their strengths and we will be ready to face them.”“We are fully aware a couple of wins can send us high in the table, but also a couple of defeats can send us towards relegation zone.”“January and February is when everything is decided so we need to get points in these games.”last_img read more

New SC bench to hear plea on Nizam Hazaris MP status

first_imgNizam HazariThe Supreme Court on Tuesday formed new bench to hear a writ petition that challenged the legality of parliament membership of ruling Awami League leader Nizam Uddin Hazari, reports UNB.The single bench of justice Abu Taher Mohammad Saifur Rahman will hear the petition, said Satyaranjon Mandal, lawyer of the petitioner.On Monday, the single HC bench of justice Farid Ahmed expressed embarrassment to hear the petition over the legality of Nizam holding a parliamentary seat and sent it to the acting chief justice.Later, the acting chief justice assigned the bench for hearing and disposing of the petition.The High Court felt embarrassed to hear the writ petition for eight times and gave split order once after hearing the plea.On 6 December last year, a HC bench delivered a split verdict on a writ petition challenging the legality of AL MP Nizam Uddin Hazari’s parliament membership.Senior judge of the bench, Justice Md Emdadul Huq, declared the election of the Feni-2 constituency MP, Nizam Hazari, illegal, while the junior judge of the bench, Justice FRM Nazmul Ahsan, rejected the petition.In 2014, Shakhawat Hossain Bhuiyan, a Juba League leader of Feni, filed the writ petition with the HC, attaching a newspaper report of 10 May 2014, stating that Nizam Uddin Hazari had been awarded 10 years of imprisonment in an arms case, but had been freed from prison two years and 10 months before his jail term was completed.last_img read more

JabaleNoor driver put on 7 dayremand

first_imgA Dhaka court on Wednesday placed one of the drivers of ‘Jabal-e-Noor Paribahan’ bus which killed two college students in a road accident on Airport Road on 29 July in the city, on a seven-day remand for interrogation.Dhaka Metropolitan Magistrate HM Toaha passed the order when DB police inspector Kazi Shariful Islam, the investigation officer of the case, produced him before the court seeking remand, news agency UNB reports.Police arrested the accused driver, Masum Billa from Barguna district sadar on Tuesday afternoon, Kazi Shariful Islam informed the court.The development came one day after the Dhaka court sent four people– bus drivers Sohagh Ali and Mohammad Zubayer, and two helpers – Enayet Hossain and Mohammad Ripon to jail over the killing.Dhaka Metropolitan magistrate HM Toaha passed the order when Riyad Ahmed, sub-inspector of Cantonment Police Station and also the investigation officer of the case, produced them before the court seeking a 10-day remand prayer.The court also fixed 6 August for hearing after the investigation officer produced them before the court seeking a 10-day remand prayer.Diya Khanam Mim and Abdul Karim Rajib, students of the college section of Shaheed Ramiz Uddin School and College, were killed as a bus ploughed through some students in front of Kurmitola General Hospital on Airport Road on 29 July.A case was filed over the accident with Cantonment Police Station on Sunday night.last_img read more