Anthony Joshua responds to Deontay Wilder’s outburst to Tyson Fury | Boxing News

first_img Wilder’s reign was conclusively ended by Fury Joshua’s promoter Eddie Hearn sarcastically reacted: “I thought AJ ducked you?”Now Joshua has exclusively told Sky Sports News about Wilder’s words: “It makes the ultimate sense.- Advertisement – Anthony Joshua has reacted to Deontay Wilder’s statement Deontay Wilder broke his silence towards Tyson Fury Deontay Wilder broke his silence towards Tyson Fury

Yves Béhar FORME Life connected fitness mirror has a built-in weight training system

first_img– Advertisement – Get a complete exercise experience at home with the Yves Béhar FORME Life connected fitness mirror. Offering a built-in weight training system, this home fitness system encompasses all you need to break a sweat. It does so with its hidden resistance system that actually simulates weight. Whether you want to push, pull, or lift, you can do so. This gorgeous piece of equipment blends right into your home. That’s because, when you aren’t using it, its arms fold up and fit behind the smart mirror. Additionally, this smart mirror incorporates a heart rate monitor and ankle strap for even more abilities. Because it stands a full six feet tall, this connected fitness mirror actually displays instructors in almost life size. You’ll feel like you’re getting a one-on-one real-time training session.last_img read more

Dan Camp, Who Created a Mississippi Jewel, Dies at 79

first_img“Most people in the community thought I was crazy for going into such a dilapidated slum area to do anything like this,” he told Mississippi Public Broadcasting in 2013.Over the years he added small cottages — 300 to 500 square feet, aimed at students — and assorted other residential units, as well as stores, restaurants, bars and public spaces, all of it on narrow streets that encouraged foot traffic and a communal feel. The district was built on the principles of the 1980s movement known as New Urbanism but came into being well before that term had been coined.“Mayor Camp talked about walkability and mixed-use development before it was cool,” Parker Wiseman, his successor as mayor, said on Twitter. “He didn’t just talk about it. He built it.” After that, Mr. Roy said, Mr. Camp kept giving him commissions just to support his art.“At any given time he might also be patron to a writer, a sculptor, a wild impressionist, a barefoot juggler, a lost intellectual or an ethically sourced hippie apparel shop,” he said. “He wanted a carousel of creatives in the neighborhood by design.”In addition to his son Robert, Mr. Camp is survived by his wife, Gemma, whom he married in 1981; another son, Frederick, known as Bonn; and two granddaughters. In 1969, Mr. Camp started buying property in that area and creating an eclectic oasis of tightly packed housing and businesses that has been drawing admiration from urban planners ever since. The Cotton District is now one of the most desirable addresses in Starkville, especially for students, a pedestrian-friendly, architecturally varied neighborhood of cottages, duplexes, apartments, street-level shops, courtyards and fountains. – Advertisement – Mr. Camp, who served a term as Starkville mayor from 2005 to 2009, died on Oct. 25 in Meridian, Miss. He was 79. His son Robert said the cause was complications of Covid-19.Robert Daniel Camp was born on April 13, 1941, in Baton Rouge, La., and raised in Tupelo, Miss. His father, Dewey, was a band director, and his mother, Opal Quay (Webb) Camp, was an educator who, the family said, was Elvis Presley’s sixth-grade home room teacher.Mr. Camp graduated from Tupelo High School in 1959, earned a bachelor’s degree in education at Mississippi State in 1963 and received at master’s degree in education at North Carolina State in 1967 before returning to Starkville. He started the Cotton District reinvention with eight small townhouses. – Advertisement –center_img This obituary is part of a series about people who have died in the coronavirus pandemic. Read about others here.When Dan Camp was in graduate school at North Carolina State University in Raleigh in the mid-1960s, a historic building caught his eye. It was a cottage where, at least according to local lore, President Andrew Johnson was born. What struck Mr. Camp was that a relatively compact space could be a perfectly adequate dwelling.- Advertisement – “I suspected that most Americans lived in that type of environment then,” he told Mississippi Magazine in 2001, “so I came home with the idea that those types of dwellings would be an excellent way to build things and offer them to students.”Back home in Mississippi, he settled in Starkville, about 125 miles northeast of Jackson, and became intrigued with the possibilities of a run-down area between the campus of Mississippi State University, where he was teaching in the industrial education department, and the downtown section that became known as the Cotton District, because of the mill that once thrived there. The mill had shut down in 1964, and the nearby millworker housing had deteriorated. “He hired me to paint a mural on his office about 10 minutes after meeting me in early 2014,” Mr. Roy said. “This was in spite of me having no paid experience, no knowledge of how to run a scissor lift and no proper sketch. He liked that the old folks across town hated my work.” – Advertisement –last_img read more

Avian flu reported again in Indonesia

first_imgMar 3, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – More than 12,000 chickens and quail have died in the past 2 months in an outbreak of avian influenza on the Indonesian island of Java, according to an Associated Press (AP) report published today.The viruses involved are H5N1 and H7N1, said an Indonesian official who spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity. Avian flu killed about 1.6 million chickens in the same region in West Java province last year, the official said.H5N1 avian flu has occurred in at least eight Asian countries since late 2003 and has caused 66 human illness cases, 46 of them fatal. No human cases have been reported in Indonesia, the AP report said.Although the official told the AP that Indonesia has been dealing with the outbreak for 2 months, the country’s most recent report on avian flu to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) was filed in October 2004.Meanwhile, Vietnam has reported that its poultry outbreaks are subsiding. More than 1.5 million birds have been culled in Vietnam since January. However, 14 of 35 affected areas have detected no new outbreaks for at least 3 weeks, China’s Xinhua news agency reported today, citing Vietnam’s Department of Animal Health.Avian flu has continued to spread in Ben Tre, Long An, and Dong Thap provinces, according to a Vietnam News Service report yesterday.Thailand’s most recent report to OIE indicated the country still has sporadic outbreaks, with fewer than 200 chickens and ducks fatally infected or culled in the week that ended Feb 24.last_img read more

Avian flu cases reported in Cambodia, Egypt

first_img The Cambodian boy died last night, said Michael O’Leary, World Health Organization (WHO) representative in Phnom Penh, who was quoted in a Reuters report today. The boy was from the southeastern province of Prey Veng, adjoining Vietnam. The girl was hospitalized Apr 2 and was said to be in stable condition, according to an AFP report today. Officials said her family raises poultry at home. A Cambodian health official said a sample from the boy tested positive for H5N1 avian flu at the Pasteur Institute in Phnom Penh, according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) report today. The official said the boy had eaten sick chickens before he fell ill. Although fewer human H5N1 infections have been diagnosed in Cambodia than in China, Vietnam, or Thailand, all six known Cambodian victims have died, according to the WHO. April 5, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Avian flu has resurfaced in two countries, killing a 12-year-old boy in Cambodia and sickening a little girl in Egypt, according to news services. A concern for human health in Gaza is the lack of oseltamivir (Tamiflu), the drug most widely used to prevent or treat H5N1 infection. Manenti told Reuters the Palestinian Authority does not have enough Tamiflu. Although Israeli officials are providing gear and 300 doses of the antiviral drug, Manenti said Gaza needs at least 1,000 doses. In addition, a 16-month-old girl in southern Egypt has contracted H5N1, according to a Reuters story today that quotes the Egyptian health and population minister, Hatem el-Gabali. Hers is the ninth case of avian flu in Egypt, el-Gabali said, although the WHO to date has confirmed only four cases. (Samples in the other cases are still being tested.) Authorities have confirmed the first instance of an H5 virus spreading to domestic poultry in Germany, in the eastern state of Saxony. Preliminary tests at a farm near Leipzig with more than 14,000 turkeys and geese showed the H5 virus, Reuters reported today. The neuraminidase subtype has not yet been determined, authorities told the news service, but the flock will be culled. In addition, another 250,000 birds will be killed in the Gaza Strip as officials try to stop the spread of the virus there, according to Reuters. Fourteen more villages in India’s western state of Maharashtra have avian flu in poultry, Reuters reported today. The neuraminidase hasn’t been typed yet, but authorities suspect they’ll receive confirmation that it is an H5N1 virus, the story said. In Africa, Niger has culled another 26,000 birds in 47 villages in the Magaria district, the Angola Press Agency reported today. Culling is expected to last a week, and owners will be compensated, the story said. Meanwhile, the H5N1 virus continues to spread among wild birds and domestic poultry, causing fear and economic woes. The election of a Hamas-led government has further cooled relations between Palestine and several countries, prompting some nations to administer aid through third parties, such as United Nations agencies, the story said. Chicken is the main source of animal protein for Gazans, said Ambrogio Manenti of the WHO office for the Palestinian territories, the story noted. Outbreaks have occurred on five Gazan farms to date, and about 250,000 birds, or 10% of all the flocks in Gaza, have been culled, the story said.last_img read more

Lab culture of human norovirus called an important first

first_imgFeb 13, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – A team of researchers has achieved what has been until now a frustratingly elusive goal: a tissue-culture model that allows natural growth in the lab of norovirus, one of the most common and least understood causes of gastrointestinal illness worldwide.Though it causes up to 23 million cases of illness each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), surprisingly little is known about how the virus attaches to and replicates within cells. The new work by Timothy Straub of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and collaborators from Tulane University, the University of Arizona, and Arizona State University should change that: They produced a three-dimensional culture of multiple cell types that mimics the epithelium of the human small intestine, and induced norovirus samples isolated from patients to grow and replicate in it.”This is an important result,” said Craig Hedberg, PhD, associate professor of environmental health sciences at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. “Up until this point, we have never had a direct measure that would allow us to know how effective any of our environmental prevention measures are against norovirus. There have been a lot of studies looking at things that might be able to kill norovirus and render foods and environmental surfaces safe from contamination, but they have always used surrogates.”Norovirus has been a difficult organism to study because, like other viruses but unlike bacteria, it will not reproduce in a simple growth medium. Instead, it requires a tissue culture resembling cells in the organisms it infects.That lack of a lab model for studying the virus has kept testing protocols, effective sanitizing and control measures, and even newer diagnostic tests out of reach. Those are important because norovirus causes such a high disease burden: It is thought to be responsible for at least half of all foodborne outbreaks of gastroenteritis every year, according to the CDC.”Nobody knows what the incidence of this disease is in the population because it is not easy to diagnose—it is just one of the range of ‘stomach flus’ that people get,” said David Ozonoff, PhD, emeritus chair of the department of environmental health at Boston University School of Public Health. “But it causes very substantial economic loss, because so many people stay home from work because they are sick or their kids are.”To create the model, Straub and collaborators grew human intestinal epithelial cells on collagen-coated microbeads that were tumbled in a rotating reactor vessel. They used the resulting tissues for five passages of two genotypes of norovirus that were originally isolated from patients during outbreaks on a cruise ship and in a nursing home, and proved the presence of norovirus by multiple assays following each passage.The work, which will be published in the March edition of Emerging Infectious Diseases and was posted online ahead of print, represents the first lab model of human norovirus infection; previous models used mouse noroviruses or a related feline virus. Scientists not involved in the research said it could point the way to a better understanding of an under-appreciated pathogen.The authors write that developing a method for culturing human norovirus in the lab was a necessary first step in the effort to understand the virus’s pathogenesis. In future research with the model, they hope to identify protective immune responses and learn more about how the virus replicates, with the aim of devising better prevention measures.Norovirus spreads through the fecal-oral route, via both food and water, but there are also indications that it can spread via environmental contamination and direct person-to-person transmission, according to the CDC.It is fiercely contagious: Ingesting as few as 10 virus particles can cause infection, and infected persons can shed virus for up to two weeks after symptoms end, the CDC says. The illness is miserable, with nausea, diarrhea and vomiting multiple times per day. Symptoms usually last from 24 to 60 hours.”Beyond the nuisance value to the individual, it is such a widespread illness and so persistent in institutional settings where you’re dealing with immune-compromised populations that it becomes an important public health problem,” Hedberg said.The CDC does not conduct routine surveillance for norovirus, so there is no way to confirm how commonly the bug occurs. So far this year, however, large outbreaks have been reported at the Scripps Research Institute in California, at Radford University in Virginia, among customers of a south Florida restaurant, in hospitals in Saskatchewan, Massachusetts, and North Carolina, and among hundreds of passengers on the ocean liner Queen Elizabeth 2.The Hilton Hotel near Dulles International Airport outside Washington, D.C. was hit so hard in mid-January, with 120 guests and staff sick, that it was forced to close for a floor-to-ceiling sanitizing. Some norovirus outbreaks, such as on cruise ships, have recurred despite repeated rounds of aggressive cleaning.Straub TM, zu Bentrup KH, Coghlan PO, et al. In vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses. Emerg Infect Dis 2007 Mar; 13(3) (early online publication) [Full text]See also:CDC information on norovirushttp://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/revb/gastro/norovirus-factsheet.htmlast_img read more

DHS aims for faster detection of airborne pathogens

first_img “We can’t afford to put a system out there that’s going to make a mistake, because the [response] actions of that mistake are tremendous,” he said. The equipment is part of DHS’s BioWatch program, which involves continuous testing of the air in 30 major cities for pathogens such as anthrax. The program was launched in the wake of the anthrax letter attacks of 2001, which killed five people and sickened 17 others. “Operational testing and evaluation of this technology is scheduled for April 2009, about a year later than initially planned,” Jenkins reported in written testimony. The reason for the delay is that DHS’s OHA revised the functional requirements for the equipment in January, about 4 months before the science and technology division was scheduled to complete the “Generation 3.0 prototype detector,” he said. Although the new equipment will be used in some indoor locations, Jenkins said, “No procedural guidance exists for responding to positive results from detectors placed indoors. According to OHA officials, they plan to develop this guidance by October 2008 and apply it to all future BioWatch detectors deployed indoors.” “This interim system will be deployed in high-consequence indoor environments to provide coverage of the highest risk facilities before the Generation 3 system will be ready for deployment,” Hooks said in his written statement. The time savings “will potentially save thousands of lives each day an attack, such as anthrax, is detected ahead of human syndromic surveillance and other public health indicators,” Robert Hooks, deputy assistant secretary for weapons of mass destruction and biodefense in DHS’s Office of Health Affairs (OHA), told the subcommittee in written testimony. The Generation 3 detectors are expected to cost considerably less: $80,000 to 90,000, with yearly operation and maintenance costs of $12,000 to $41,000, Jenkins said. Under questioning by a subcommittee member, Hooks said the original schedule for setting up the new system was too optimistic. “Over a period of time as we managed the program, we looked optimistically at deploying the equipment earlier than was actually realistic,” he said. (A recording of the hearing is available from the Homeland Security Committee Web site.) Hooks said the automated equipment will be tested at two BioWatch sites for 3 to 6 months. If DHS then decides to proceed with the system, initial deployment will begin in the fall of 2010. The program has detected “dozens” of pathogens of concern, or “BioWatch actionable results,” over the years, Hooks reported in his written statement. “These valid laboratory findings have been attributed in all cases to naturally occurring environmental sources,” he said. Jenkins, in his written statement, said DHS officials told him they plan to start operational tests of the Generation 2.5 detectors in November. If they pass the tests, the agency plans to buy more than 100 of them, at a cost of $120,000 each, plus annual maintenance costs of $65,000 to $72,000, he reported. No false-positivesIn other comments at the hearing, Hooks said the BioWatch program has analyzed more than 7 million samples without generating a single false-positive result since its inception in 2003. See also: Interim system for indoor sitesIn the face of that time lag, DHS is working on setting up an interim automated system to provide fast detection of pathogens in certain high-risk indoor locations, DHS officials told the subcommittee. The interim system, called Generation 2.5, is designed to identify pathogens in 4 to 6 hours, but it is more costly than the Generation 3 equipment and will not test for as many different agents. Jenkins said plans call for the new detectors to replace all the current detectors by 2013. Jul 22, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) plans to adopt new automated equipment that will be able to detect dangerous airborne pathogens in major US cities in as little as 4 hours, with a goal of starting deployment in the fall of 2010, DHS officials told Congress last week. In response to questions about DHS’s ability to start operational testing of the new detectors in April 2009, BioWatch Director Dr. Jeffrey Stiefel said DHS expects to meet that schedule, but stressed that the equipment must be tested thoroughly because of the high stakes involved. Currently, filters from collection equipment are removed manually, taken to a laboratory, and tested, a process that takes from 10 to 34 hours, officials told the House Homeland Security Subcommittee on Emerging Threats, Cybersecurity, and Science and Technology. The new equipment will collect and test air samples automatically, reducing detection time to between 4 and 6 hours, officials said. The new system is also designed to test for more pathogens than the existing system. Stiefel told the subcommittee in response to questions, “We are operational in New York City in a couple of venues with Generation 2.5.” However, development of the automated sampling equipment is about a year behind the original schedule, said William O. Jenkins Jr., director of homeland security and justice issues for the Government Accountability Office (GAO), Congress’s investigative arm. Statement by the GAO’s William O. Jenkins Jr. to the House subcommitteehttp://www.gao.gov/new.items/d08960t.pdflast_img read more

Surging flu cases may herald tough season in England

first_imgDec 24, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – While the US influenza season has started slowly, cases are surging in England, raising concern that the country could have its toughest season since 1999-2000.In England and Wales last week, about 68.5 people per 100,000 saw a general practitioner for influenza-like illness (ILI), a 73% increase over the 39.5 per 100,000 the week before, according to the latest weekly report from the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP). A BBC News report said the number also is73% higher than the same week a year ago.Dr. Douglas Fleming, director of the RCGP Research Unit in Birmingham, said the increase was significant, according to BBC News. “In the past 10 years, the only substantial outbreak was in 1999-2000,” he said. “I think we could be looking at something that approaches that this year.”The RCGP report says ILI visit rates of 30 to 100 per 100,000 population per week are “usual when influenza viruses are circulating,” rates above 100 are above average, and rates exceeding 200 are “exceptional.” The RCGP data are drawn from about 85 general practitioner clinics around the country, representing an at-risk population of about 840,000.ILI rates rose in all age-groups and regions in the week of Dec 15 to 21, the RCGP report says. The highest rates were seen among 15- to 44-year-olds, with 79.7 cases per 100,000, and 45- to 64-year-olds, with 75.6 cases. The 65-and-older group had 44.7 cases per 100,000, which was more than double the 18 cases seen the week before.The BBC report said experts believe the unusually cold weather might have contributed to the surge in cases.British public health officials define a flu epidemic as an ILI rate of 200 per 100,000, according to the BBC story. The last time that happened in England was in 1989-90, the report said.”That one caught everyone a bit off guard but there’s been a big push on flu vaccination since then,” virologist John Oxford of Queen Mary’s School of Medicine and Dentistry in London told the BBC.Oxford and others quoted in the story urged people to get a flu shot if they haven’t done so yet.David Salisbury, director of immunization at the UK Department of Health, told the BBC, “We have had a very unusual run of winters with almost no flu, so we should not be surprised that here is a winter with more flu. It is very difficult to predict what makes the change winter to winter.”In contrast to the situation in England, flu activity in the United States has remained low so far this season, according to the latest report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, issued Dec 19. The report, for the week that ended Dec 13, said only three states—Texas, Virginia, and Hawaii—were reporting local flu activity. Thirty-six states reported sporadic cases and 11 states were reporting none.Google Flu Trends, a Web site that estimates US flu activity from the volume of Internet searches for flu information, currently shows “moderate” activity only in Hawaii, Maryland, and Virginia, with the rest of the country having low activity.See also: CDC flu surveillance updatehttp://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/Google Flu Trendshttp://www.google.org/flutrends/last_img read more

Novi turistički vodič kroz tri hrvatske županije “Zima na sjeveru”

first_imgVodič „Zima na sjeveru“, čije je tiskano izdanje objavljeno ovog tjedna kao prilog dnevnim novinama, dostupan i za preuzimanje s weba – predstavlja turističke sadržaje i ponudu Međimurske, Krapinsko-zagorske i Varaždinske županije.Kontinentalna Hrvatska, a posebice županije sjeverno od Zagreba imaju mnogo toga za ponuditi te su u vodiču navedene mogućnosti zimskog odmora i doživljaja na području ove tri hrvatske županije te kuponi s popustima koji se mogu iskoristiti u 2018. godini. U besplatnom vodiču “Zima na sjeveru”, na 12 stranica velikog formata, otkrivene su sve čari odmora na sjeveru, a čitatelji mogu upoznati zimsku turističku ponudu Krapinsko-zagorsku, Varaždinsku te Međimursku županiju.Cijela kampanja je bila fokusirana na Zagreb i Zagrebačku županiju, a sadrži insertaciju brošure u nacionalni dnevne novine koja je sasvim sigurno dobila puno širi doseg kampanje, distribucija brošure po raznim lokacijama, kao i pdf brošura koja je promovirana po internetu i društvenim mrežama. „Imali su odličnu suradnju sa svim turističkim subjektima tako da smo uspjeli prezentirati široku paletu turističkih sadržaja i ponudu koju nudi Sjever hrvatske. Glavni cilj je da damo do znanja zagrebu kako postoji i kvalitetna turistička ponuda i na kontinentu.“ istaknuo je Saša Vugrinec iz agencije Scribo PR iz Čakovca, koja je bila zadužena za cijelu impelmentaciju i promociju “Vodiča na sjeveru”.Side dish: Zima na sjeveru<br />
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The state is selling Hotel Zagorje, a former political school in Kumrovec

first_imgThe Ministry of State Property has published a public call for bids for the purchase of real estate owned by the Republic of Croatia, ie Hotel Zagorje, a former political school in Kumrovec. Hotel Zagorje “has a total gross construction area of ​​11.310,00 m2 distributed on four floors and a gross volume of 34.464,20 m2. The starting price is HRK 11.960.000,00, while the deadline for submitting bids is May 07, 2019. So far, according to unofficial information, there has been investor interest in the said hotel, even specific inquiries from Chinese investors. But now the public call is open and the first interest for the investor will be seen, there is no more talk, only officially. center_img Attachment: Public invitation for submission of bids for the purchase of real estate owned by the Republic of Croatia – Hotel Zagorjelast_img read more