Twisters Fall To Shiners In Baseball Season Opener

first_imgThe Oldenburg Academy Twisters fall to The Rising Sun Shiners 5-2 in their season opener.OA at Rising Sun, 4/1/15OA 001 001 0 2 2 4RS 130 001 x 5 6 3For Oldenburg:Cory Schuman 0-3, BBBryce Ahaus 1-4, 2 runsSam Gast 0-3, BBTannery Alley 0-1, 3 BBZach Pottschmidt 1-3, 2 rbi, BBClay Hunger 0-3, BBMatt Zinser 0-2, BBPitching:Zach Pottschmidt 6 IP, 5 runs, 3 earned, 6 hits, 2 K, 1 BB LossVarsity record: 0-1Next game: Saturday, 4/4/15 at Cambridge City Lincoln.Courtesy of Twisters Coach Doug Behlmer.last_img read more

Isla set for QPR move

first_img The 47-cap Chile defender has completed his medical at Loftus Road and tweeted news of his move on Tuesday morning, before later removing the post. Redknapp’s fourth summer signing should be officially ratified just a day after QPR paid a fee believed to reach £6million to prise Jordon Mutch away from Cardiff City. The 26-year-old Chilean should see his QPR move confirmed once the club receive official endorsement on the transfer from the Football Association. Manager Harry Redknapp has secured Isla’s services on a one-year loan with a view to a permanent transfer, Press Association Sport understands. Juventus defender Mauricio Isla has completed terms on a season-long loan deal with QPR, with the London club awaiting work-permit confirmation.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

NopeNopeNope: Snake Crawls From Coral Springs Toilet, Bites Resident

first_imgBroward resident Baltazar Jimeno got a nasty surprise Sunday morning when he lifted the toilet seat at his Coral Springs apartment and was attacked by a ball puthon that ‘rose up and bit him’ on the arm.The snake, which measured 4 feet long, did not belong to the 52 year old Jimeno and it’s unclear how it ended up in his toilet though police suspect it may have come up through the building’s plumbing.Ball pythons are not venomous and can grow up to 6 feet long.Jimeno was treated by paramedics for the snake bite.The snake was taken by Coral Springs animal control and is being treated by a local veterinarian for an unrelated illness.last_img read more

ICC World Cup ICC Cricket World Cup 2019: Virat Kohli hits half-century of fifties in clash vs Australia

first_img New Delhi: After Rohit Sharma’s attacking fifty and a brilliant century from Shikhar Dhawan, India cricket team skipper Virat Kohli joined in the fun as he blasted his 50th fifty in ODIs. The Indian cricket team skipper notched up his landmark by working offspinner Glenn Maxwell to the deep midwicket fence for a single. Kohli built upon the efforts of Dhawan and Rohit as India aimed for a total close to 325 against an Australian side that struggled on the flat deck at the Kennington Oval in London after India had won the toss and chose to bat. Kohli became the seventh Indian player to hit 50 or more fifties in ODIs. Sachin Tendulkar heads the list with 96 fiftiesBoth Dhawan and Rohit started slowly and it was the left-hander who smashed the first boundary of the match when he caressed a full ball from Pat Cummins to the deep extra cover fence. The pressure of the early overs was released when Dhawan slammed three boundaries off Nathan Coulter-Nile in the eighth over. The first boundary was a drive straight down the ground, the second was a cut shot to the deep cover fence while the third was a late-cut to the third man fence.RELATEDAfter going past the landmark, Dhawan pounced on Stoinis by smashing two consecutive boundaries and despite losing Rohit for 57, Dhawan continued his aggression. He blasted two fours off legspinner Adam Zampa and got near to his century by getting an under-edge to a short ball from Pat Cummins as he attempted the upper-cut again. The left-hander raced through the 90s by pulling Zampa to the deep square leg fence and he reached the landmark in dramatic fashion.The left-hander pushed a full ball from Marcus Stoinis to the mid-off region and looked for a single but sent Virat Kohli back half-way down the pitch. The fielder scored a direct hit and the ricochet resulted in a single. Rohit Sharma has always had memorable moments against Australia when it comes to his cricketing career. His first double century came against Australia in 2013 and he has the most centuries in his ODI career against Australia. Rohit has also amassed other records in his career and in the ICC Cricket World Cup 2019 clash against Australia at the Kennington Oval, the Mumbai right-hander notched up yet another milestone. Rohit became the fourth player to score 2000 runs in ODIs against Australia. Sachin Tendulkar is the leading run-getter with 3077 runs at an average of 44.57 with nine centuries. With Shikhar Dhawan batting aggressively, Rohit was content on playing second fiddle. The batsman pushed legspinner Adam Zampa to long off for a single and he became the fastest to 2000 runs against Australia, achieving the feat in just his 37th game. highlights Virat Kohli hit his 50th fifty in ODIs.Kohli is the seventh Indian to reach 50 ODI fifties.India last won against Australia in the 2011 World Cup.center_img For all the Latest Sports News News, ICC World Cup News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

Hamilton sweeps to dominant Belgian F1 win

first_imgBy Abhishek Takle(REUTERS) – Lewis Hamilton took another step towards a record-equalling seventh Formula One title on Sunday with a dominant lights-to-flag victory in the Belgian Grand Prix.The Briton, who had started from pole position after an inspired qualifying display, was at the front for every single lap as he led team mate Valtteri Bottas across the line for a Mercedes one-two.Hamilton looked to be in perfect control in the lead after retaining his advantage at the start and down the long flat-out blast to the Les Combes chicane despite a snap of oversteer.The durability of his tyres, which stirred memories of his winning three-wheeled limp to the line at his home British Grand Prix, raised some concern for the champion.But even those worries, which injected a hint of jeopardy into the otherwise straightforward race, proved unfounded as he crossed the line a comfortable 8.4 seconds clear of his Finnish stablemate.“I know it’s not necessarily what everybody always wants to see, a Mercedes at the front,” said Hamilton, who now has a 50-point lead in the championship over Bottas and is 47 ahead of Red Bull’s third-placed finisher Max Verstappen.“But no matter how much success we have, we just keep our heads down.”Hamilton’s win was the 89th of his career, putting him ever closer to matching Michael Schumacher’s seven title triumphs and leaving him just two short of the German’s record tally of 91 race victories.It was also the champion’s fifth win from seven races so far this season and the fourth of his career on the Spa-Francorchamps track.Bottas, winner of the season-opening Austrian Grand Prix but now effectively two whole race victories behind Hamilton, said: “I think Lewis was faultless today.”“PRETTY BORING” Verstappen, the only non-Mercedes winner so far this year, took his sixth consecutive podium but dubbed the race “boring.”“I ran out of tyres at the end, so I was just stretching it out, saving the front tyres,” said the 22-year-old, who had a lonely afternoon after a first-lap battle with former team mate Daniel Ricciardo.“It was not enjoyable out there today.”Ricciardo finished fourth for Renault, while also taking the extra point for fastest lap. Team mate Esteban Ocon rounded off a strong weekend for the French manufacturer by snatching fifth on the last lap from Red Bull’s Alexander Albon.Lando Norris, the sole McLaren in the race after team mate Carlos Sainz failed to make the start due to an exhaust issue, was seventh while Alpha Tauri’s Pierre Gasly took ‘Driver of the Day’ honours in eighth.FERRARI STRUGGLE Ferrari, winners in Belgium for the last two years, finished out of the points as their lack of speed was laid bare on Spa’s long straights.Sebastian Vettel, leaving Ferrari at the end of the year, was 13th, a place ahead of last year’s pole-sitter and winner Charles Leclerc, whose race was further hampered by slow pitstops.“We need to work and find something because like this it’s very difficult,” Leclerc said of the Italian team’s form that even drew a shake of the head from Vettel’s replacement Sainz.The race was interrupted by an early safety car, sent out after a crash involving Antonio Giovinazzi and George Russell.The Italian lost control of his Alfa Romeo at the exit of the Fagnes chicane.Russell, running behind Giovinazzi in his Williams, collected a loose wheel that came off the car, leaving debris strewn across the track.last_img read more

Father, husband, sibling, Badger

first_imgView Gallery (2 Photos)Marcus Landry is by no means the best basketball player in the country, but what some players have in skill, Marcus Landry has in passion and drive.The father of three children — Marcus Jr., Mariah and Makaylah — Landry has more reasons to be a successful basketball player than do most collegiate athletes. Unlike other players on the Badgers — or most teams for that matter — Landry has a family he needs to support.“After college, the classroom and basketball, I have to find a way to provide for my family,” Landry said. “Whether it be through basketball or my education. So, they’ve helped me succeed in life and basketball and school.”The Badgers’ senior forward has accumulated over 1,000 points in his career at Wisconsin, was part of two Big Ten champion squads, and more than anything else, has left a legacy behind him that his teammates and coaches won’t forget.“He’s a great success story,” University of Wisconsin assistant coach Gary Close said. “There are probably a lot of people who questioned whether he’d survive here. Not only has he survived, he’s thrived. He’s a terrific kid that’s got his priorities straight, wanted to prove people wrong and had just done a lot of work. It’s been fun to watch.”A Milwaukee native, Landry attended Vincent High School, where he led the team to the state championship final game, averaging 16.1 points and 5.9 rebounds per game his senior season.Family tiesWhile he had individual success in high school, he was unable to match his brother Carl, who led his high school squad to a state championship title.However, Landry accomplished what his brother was never able to do — win a Big Ten title.“I think that he’ll wish his brother well, but at the same time he’ll want bragging rights over him,” teammate Morris Cain said. “It’s very competitive, and he likes playing with him and hanging out with him, so I’m sure he liked [winning the Big Ten title] a lot.”Landry already has a full family of his own, but he would not be where he is now if not for his wife and siblings. According to Landry, the competitive spirit with his brother drove him to become dedicated to the sport. Landry’s wife, Efueko, played basketball at Marquette and his sister currently plays at Temple University.“Obviously, [Carl] has helped me tremendously with a lot of stuff, but just seeing where he’s at and all the things he’s accomplished makes me want to accomplish those and do it better,” Marcus said. “That’s the way I’ve been since I was little. I always competed in that way with him, that’s just the way I always did it.”With his brother currently playing in the NBA for the Houston Rockets, Landry strives for excellence and hopes to play in the same league next year. He believes his family ties to basketball have led to his drive to take his game to the next level.“They’re playing basketball,” Landry said. “It’s something where I don’t want to be the only one out, and basketball is fun. It’s something I love to do and, of course, them all being basketball players gives me that drive to play.”“I’m sure it was a family event, so to speak,” Close said. “He’s always had a great passion for the game and wants to achieve at a higher level, and I think his basketball is ahead of him. I think it’ll be fun to see just how much better he can get.”Also, while he they may not be blood-related, Landry and UW great Alando Tucker were best friends when he attended the university. Landry views his experiences with Tucker as major influences for the way he conducts himself on and off the court.“Alando Tucker was my roommate and he’s the type of guy — he was like my brother,” Landry said. “He’s my brother here — he’s a great guy to be around. He was the one who always gave me a lot of advice. He taught me a lot of things about basketball, a lot of things that are still with me.”Overcoming adversityRight now, Landry may be the face of Wisconsin basketball, but it was not always that way. As a freshman, he struggled on the court physically and off the court academically. But along with the help of his teammates, he was able to overcome that adversity he faced as a freshman.“As a team, we kind of helped him out,” Cain said. “It was more of a team effort; we just stuck by him and told him that we’d be with him no matter what.”“I think he’s matured from a young man to a grown man,” Close said. “A lot has been thrown at him at a lot of different venues and avenues, and he’s tackled it with a lot of spirit and determination.”Now, Landry has started 53 straight games, averages 12.7 points and 4.3 rebounds per game and is one of the biggest vocal and physical leaders on the team.“It was great to just be a leader out there and be someone that my teammates looked at to make something happen,” he said. “It’s great just playing with my teammates and being a very unselfish player.”Maturity and leadershipWith a lifetime accomplishment of a full family achieved by age 22, Landry has done more for his personal life than has any other Badger. His teammates believe his maturity is a result of his distinct way of life.“There’s certain lifestyles that college kids live, and Marcus doesn’t live that lifestyle,” Cain said. “He’s definitely more mature than most of the kids on campus and considering what he has to do, I definitely think that has impacted his experience here.”Supporting his family, along with being a strong basketball player and teammate, has made him a role model for everyone on the team, and though his lifestyle may be irregular, he influences his other teammates and coaches by being a mature leader on and off the court.“He’s got a lot on his plate, a lot of responsibility. To his credit, he took it head-on where some people might have done something different,” Close said. “The whole package is part of the success story of what he’s accomplished as a father and a husband, as well as a student and an athlete. He’s done a lot of terrific things.”As for Landry’s influences, look no further than his youngest daughter’s godfather — fellow teammate Joe Krabbenhoft.“Just by his character, the way he always goes hard. He’s a tough guy, and there’s just a lot of things he’s doing that I need to do,” Landry said. “Off the court, the way he handles himself, he’s just a great guy and the type of guy that rubs off on me and I try to do the things that he’s doing.”Life after collegeLandry has always wanted to play professional basketball, but his collegiate years have been more important to him than any other part of his life. According to Landry, it’s not just his basketball skills that he hopes people look back on but his character that is the most integral part of his career at UW.“It’s great. It shows where I’ve come from and the type of dedication that I have to being a good player and being a guy that everyone’s able to get along with and just being a very respectful guy.”While most of the students at Wisconsin know him as the guy with the goggles who dominates the paint, Landry hopes they remember him for something not related to the sport.“I just want them to think of me as a great guy, a guy that works hard and is respectful,” he said. “I guess respect goes a long way in how people think about you. So when the fans say my name, I just want them to say, ‘Hey, he was a great guy to be around.’”last_img read more

iSchool professor coaches Finland, Portugal’s rowing teams

first_imgSyracuse University professor Michael D’Eredita established the first varsity sport in Finland. While coaching overseas in Turku, Finland in 2000, he and a team created University Rowing. Previously, sports were available through clubs and were not university-sponsored. He went on to coach Finland’s national rowing team, bringing them back-to-back scholars in the World Rowing Cup and the 2000 World Championship title. He was also responsible for two rowers winning the World Rowing Cup lightweight women’s single and lightweight men’s single scull event for Finland.Fifteen years later, the iSchool professor is still coaching, now as the high performance director for Portugal’s national rowing team.He’s led both the Finland and Portugal teams to Rowing World Cup medals. As the high performance director, D’Eredita is in charge of creating a system including a team of coaches, athletes and a training program.D’Eredita’s passion for rowing began when he was on the rowing team in high school in Liverpool, New York.“I purposefully took to rowing for two reasons — one person told me that it was the hardest sport so I took it as a challenge,” D’Eredita said. “The other reason I chose it was that I always viewed it as a lifelong sport.”When he was in graduate school studying cognitive/experimental psychology at Syracuse University, he was the graduate assistant for the university’s rowing team. He went on to coach U.S. developmental and U.S. pre-elite teams, before traveling to Finland in 2000. Around the same time, he took a job teaching at SU.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDespite the travel required for him to coach, D’Eredita’s work overseas doesn’t interfere with his teaching profession. The professor has chosen to live in the United States in order to keep teaching at SU.Marcene Sonneborn, an iSchool professor who teaches classes on information technology startups with D’Eredita, said D’Eredita’s traveling has never been a problem for the two of them. Sonneborn added that they work collaboratively to plan out the semester.Sonneborn, who has worked with D’Eredita for about six years, added D’Eredita’s passion for rowing is evident.“When he talks about rowing, that is his true love and it’s just something that he gets a lot personally from it, and he is always very animated when he talks about it,” Sonneborn said. “When he talks about the individuals he’s coaching, it’s almost like a father coaching a son,” Sonneborn said.It was this passion for coaching that led D’Eredita from a winning Finland to a less-talented Portugal in 2003. The national team was performing very poorly, and needed to win medals in an Olympic event at the Senior or Under 23 World Championships by 2004. If Portugal didn’t, its Olympic Committee was going to deem rowing as a recreational sport and stop funding the team.When D’Eredita arrived to coach, one of Portugal’s best athletes, named Luis Teixeira, was ready to quit. But after one week at training camp with D’Eredita, the athlete had a change of heart. With D’Eredita as the new coach, Portugal won two bronze medals at two World Cup events and won the silver medal at the Under 23 Championships that the team needed in 2004.Adrian Hatch, a junior information management and technology major, said D’Eredita’s success as a coach shows in his teaching of entrepreneurship. He said D’Eredita knows how to build and run a team, and teach someone else to do the same.“You can tell he has a passion. He made the point that you don’t have to be a rower to teach these guys, because you can be passionate about rowing,” said Hatch, who has taken several classes with D’Eredita. “But all the guys on the team are great at rowing. They are as good as it’s going to get.”When a new administration took over the Portugal Rowing Federation in 2004, D’Eredita got replaced by a new coach. But when the state of rowing dropped during the new administration, Teixeira, who trained with D’Eredita, started his own international training center and four-star hotel. In 2011, Teixeira decided to run for president of the rowing federation. He asked D’Eredita to come back to Portugal to “clean up the mess” made by the new administration.Teixeira is now the president of the Portugal Rowing Federation, a position he’s held since 2012. He was the one who asked D’Eredita to come back to Portugal as high performance director.“I’m addicted to building something from nothing. While there wasn’t ‘nothing’ there, in terms of international results and a system, there wasn’t a system. So that’s the fun part,” D’Eredita said. “It’s building a system that hopefully will continue to turn out results in the long run.”D’Eredita believes failure is a great thing, however. It teaches athletes that the gold medals are earned and don’t just happen because of luck.“The woman I used to coach, Laila Finska, used to say that you have to learn how to lose before you win and she’s right,” D’Eredita said. “What is really meant by that is, to really lose means you are going into an event thinking and believing you are going to win. That’s when you really lose.” Comments Published on February 5, 2015 at 12:57 am Contact: maquigle@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Charlotte de Vries’ 2nd-quarter goal sparks Syracuse’s 2-goal comeback win over Lafayette

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 2, 2019 at 10:23 pm Contact Adam: adhillma@syr.edu | @_adamhillman Syracuse couldn’t solve the Lafayette defense. Every time it tried to wind its way into the shooting circle, the Leopards poked the ball away, ending the scoring chance. The Orange appeared tired, worn out by an opening-weekend of three games in four days.  That was until the end of the second quarter.Following a foul on the left side of the cage, Charlotte de Vries stood with her knees bent, ready for the ball. Knowing that the penalty corner play wasn’t designed for her, she leaped off the line, searching for a rebound.SJ Quigley’s shot did just that. It bounced off Lafayette goalie Sarah Park’s glove, right into the path of de Vries. The freshman, without wasting a second, one-timed the ball into the right side of the cage.“I’m responsible for always being on post, scoring the goals that we need,” de Vries said, “So when we were down 2-0, I was like ‘I have to find the net or something.’ I was kind of motivated after the first quarter.” AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSU was able to dominate possession, as the defense allowed only one shot after de Vries’ goal. The Orange started to play more long balls instead of trying to be as direct through the middle of the field. No. 18 Syracuse (3-0) scored one more goal in the third quarter to tie the game before sophomore Laura Graziosi slotted home the game-winner in the second overtime, defeating Lafayette (1-1) 3-2.Before de Vries’ fourth goal in her third collegiate game, SU trailed by two goals and had only tallied one shot in the first quarter. But, that goal sparked the Orange. The team improved its energy and structure, head coach Ange Bradley said, tallying six shots on goal to Lafayette’s zero after the first half. Syracuse walked into halftime motivated – even though it trailed by a goal – determined to take advantage of the momentum de Vries provided. The Orange, desperate to find another goal, spent the majority of halftime trying to pump each other up, Graziosi said.Four minutes into the third quarter, SU found what it was looking for – again through its star freshman.de Vries, receiving a pass from Graziosi off a penalty corner, rifled a shot toward the bottom left corner of the cage. With a plethora of bodies blocking the vision of Park, sophomore Tess Queen placed her stick in front of the ball’s path.It swerved to the opposite side of the net, tying the score at two. Queen threw her arms in the air as de Vries hugged her. “We all knew that we had to do something to get back and win this game, and eventually we did that,” Graziosi said.Amy Nakamura | Co-Digital EditorThat emphasis continued throughout the second half as the Orange outshot the Leopards 12-0 over the last 41 minutes of regulation. With a shift in the way SU defended and pressed Lafayette, Syracuse upped the pace of play.Graziosi and junior Carolin Hoffmann sprinted, deked, and evaded defenders out wide near the sideline, de Vries weaved through masses of backs and midfielders up the middle, and junior SJ Quigley dispossessed Leopards in the middle of the field.But, the Orange couldn’t find a third goal. Penalty corner after penalty corner was blocked, sailed wide, or even crashed against the post. Breakaways were halted with timely poke checks from Lafayette’s backs. And, in one instance, Hoffmann’s one-on-one with Park, where she dodged the goalkeeper and had an open net, was stopped by a kneeling back.“It’s gonna break eventually. It’s just a matter of when,” Bradley said of her mindset in the second half. “We were jamming the middle of the circle a little bit too much.”That “break” didn’t come in the fourth quarter, or even the first overtime when the Orange tallied two shots on goal in only ten minutes. It came, finally, in the first minute of the second overtime.Freshman Hailey Bitters, collecting the ball near the sideline, cradled her way past two LU backs, entering the shooting circle. She floated a lofting pass to Graziosi, who was standing alone in front of goal. The Hauge, Netherlands native slapped her stick at the ball, which deflected off Park and into the open cage.The SU bench dashed onto the field and surrounded Graziosi, relieved that it avoided an upset to the unranked Leopards.  “I think we just realized that we were playing…it’s our home opener, like we can’t lose,” de Vries said. Commentslast_img read more

Ward going for glory

first_imgJoe Ward aims to reach his second successive World Final this evening.The Moate southpaw faces Uzbekistan’s Bektimer Melikuziev in the light-heavyweight semi-finals in Hamburg.23-year-old Ward has already made history at the tournament by becoming the first male Irish boxer to win three World elite medals.last_img